Current Trends In Caucasian, East European And Inner Asian Linguistics : Papers In Honor Of Howard I : Aronson.

By: Aronson, Howard IContributor(s): Holisky, Dee Ann | Tuite, KevinSeries: Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic SciencePublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2003Copyright date: ©2003Description: 1 online resource (454 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027275257Subject(s): Former Soviet republics -- LanguagesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Current Trends In Caucasian, East European And Inner Asian Linguistics : Papers In Honor Of Howard I : AronsonDDC classification: 409/.47 LOC classification: P381.S59 -- C87 2003ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
CURRENT TRENDS IN CAUCASIAN, EAST EUROPEAN AND INNER ASIAN LINGUISTICS -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- INTRODUCTION -- 1. Languages of the Caucasus -- 2. Siberian indigenous languages -- 3. Slavic -- 4. Acknowledgements -- REFERENCES -- FOREWORD -- THE PUBLICATIONS OF HOWARD I. ARONSON -- In Press and Forthcoming -- TOWARDS A PHONOLOGICA L TYPOLOGY OF NATIVE SIBERIA -- 1.m/n/ñ/ŋ -- 2. Initial -- 2.1 Word-initial -- 2.2 in syllable-onset position in non-word-initial syllables -- 2.3 On in the languages of Siberia -- 3. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- ON THE SYNTAX OF POSSESSIVE REFLEXIVE PRONOUNS INMODERN GEORGIAN AND CERTAIN INDO-EUROPEANLANGUAGES -- REFERENCES -- HOW MANY VERB CLASSES ARE THERE IN MINGRELIAN? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General comments on Mingrelian verbal classification -- 3. Various criteria which do not help to distinguish Class 4 -- 4. Areas for further research -- 4.1 Screeve distribution -- 4.2 Animacy of arguments -- 4.3 Work with native consultants -- 5. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- MORE PONTICFURTHER ETYMOLOGIES BETWEEN INDO-EUROPEAN AND NORTHWEST CAUCASIAN -- KEY TO NOTATION -- REFERENCES -- THE BULGARIANS OF MOLDOVA AND THEIR LANGUAGE -- 1. The Bulgarians of Moldova -- 2. Studying the Bulgarian of Moldova -- 3. The Dialectal Membership of Moldovan Bulgarian -- 4. Linguistic Features of the Moldovan Dialects of Bulgarian -- 4.1 Phonology: The vocalic system -- 4.2 Phonology: The consonantal system -- 4.3 Morphology: Divergences from the standard -- 5, Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- LEGALDOCUMENTS -- INTERVIEWS CONDUCTED WITH THE FOLLOWING PERSONS: -- LAKFOLKTALES: MATERIALS FOR A BILINGUAL READER:PART TWO -- 1. Forward -- 2. Introduction -- 3. Abbreviations -- 4. Tale Two -- 5. Vocabulary.
TYPOLOGY OF WRITING, GREEK ALPHABET, AND THEORIGIN OF ALPHABETIC SCRIPTS OF THE CHRISTIAN ORIENT -- 1. Writing as a semiotic system -- 2. The 'Plane of content' and the 'Plane of expression ' of writing -- 3. 'Paradigmatics' and 'Syntagmatics' of writing -- 4. Ancient Greek as an earliest sample of alphabetic writing -- 5. Alphabetic scripts of the Christian Orient -- 6. Alphabetic system - a final stage in the development of writing? -- REFERENCES -- THE CASE FOR DIALECT CONTINUA IN TUNGUSIC PLURAL MORPHOLOGY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Geography and Dialects of Northwest ern Tungusic -- 3. Interpreting the Distribution of Plurals in Northwestern Tungusic -- 4. Dominant Plural Markers -- 5. Secondary Plurals -- 5.1 Kinship terms -- 5.2 Duals and Collectives -- 6. Residual Plurals -- 6.1 Residual plurals in Northwestern Tungusic -- 6.3 Residual plural morphemes in other Tungusic languages -- 7. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- DIALECT/LANGUAGE ABBREVIATIONS USED ON THE MAP"PLURALS IN TUNGUSIC DIALECTS -- INGUSH INFLECTIONAL VERB MORPHOLOGYA SYNCHRONIC CLASSIFICATION AND HISTORICAL ANALYSIS WITH COMPARISON TO CHECHEN -- 0. Introduction -- notation -- 1. Basic verb inflections -- 2. Historical considerations -- 2.1 Historically periphrastic verb tenses built on converbs -- 2.2 Ingush ablaut and its historical origins in umlaut -- 2.3 Stem -Final /-l/ -- 3. Comparison of Ingush and Chechen verb paradigms -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- APPENDIX I: The Ingush sound system VOWELS -- APPENDIX II: Key to Abbreviations -- APPENDIX III: Forms in the Ingush-Chechen cognate database -- THE PREHISTORY OF UDI LOCATIVE CASES AND LOCATIVE PREVERBS -- 1. Locative cases -- 1.1 The system synchronically -- 1.2 On Reconstruction -- 2. Locative preverbs -- 3. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- VOWELS AND VOWEL HARMONY IN NAMANGAN TATAR -- 0. A Note on the term 'Tatar'.
1. Phonetic Descriptions of Standard Literary Tatar -- 2. The Vowels of Namangan Tatar -- 3. Tatar Vowel Harmony Systems -- 3.1 Backness Harmony -- 3.2 Abstractness in Harmony -- 4. Rounding Harmony -- 5. SLT Rounding Harmony -- 6. Summary -- REFERENCES -- THE NAKH-DAGHESTANIAN CONSONANT CORRESPONDENCES -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Proto-Nakh-Daghestanian -- 1.2 Assumptions and conventions -- 1.3 Grammatical preliminaries -- 1.3.1 Gender classes -- 1.3.2 Thematic type -- 1.3.3 Valence -- 2. Basic segmental correspondences and reconstructions -- 2.1 Correspondences and reconstructions -- 2.2 PND st and stt -- 2.3 Additional PND phonemes -- 2.4 Nakh consonants without clear sources -- 3. Morphophonemic canon -- 3.1 Clusters -- 3.2 Gender prefixation -- 3.3 Other prefixes -- 3.4 Initial clusters in Nakh and Xinalug -- 3.5 Labialization -- 3.6 Pharyngealization -- 3.7Ablaut -- 3.8 Thematic vs. athematic declension -- 3.9 Consonant shifting -- 4 The Nakh-Daghestanian family tree -- REFERENCES -- TABLE1. PND CONSONANTS AND THEIR NAKH REFLEXES. -- TABLE2. CONSONANT SHIFTING IN VARIOUS WORDS FORCATTLE. -- TABLE 3. VOICED AFFRICATES IN WORDS FOR CATTLE. -- APPENDIX 1: NAKH AND DAGHESTANIAN CONSONANT CORRESPONDENCES. -- 1.1. PLAIN STOPS AND AFFRICATES -- APPENDIX 1.2. EJECTIVES. -- APPENDIX 1.3. VOICED STOPS AND AFFRICATES -- APPENDIX 1.4. PLAIN FORTIS AFFRICATES AND CLUSTER. -- APPENDIX 1.5. FORTIS EJECTIVE AFFRICATES. -- APPENDIX1.6. VOICELESS FRICATIVES -- APPENDIX 1.7. VOICELESS FRICATIVES. -- APPENDIX 1.8. SONORANTS. -- APPENDIX 2. SELECTED PND COGNATE SETS. -- CONSTRAINTS ON REFLEXIVIZATION IN TSEZ -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 On reflexives -- 1.2 Preliminary information on Tsez -- 2. The expression of reflexivity -- 2.1 Intrinsic reflexives -- 2.2 Reflexive pronouns -- 2.3 Pronouns with the particle -tow -- 3. Compound reflexives: Distribution and locality.
4. Pronouns with the enclitic -tow -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1 Logophors: minimal and extended domains of coreference -- 5.2 The structural and linear position of antecedents -- 6. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- THE DIACHRONY OF DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS IN EASTCAUCASIAN -- 0. Objectives -- 1. Some prerequisites -- 2. The architecture of the paradigms of demonstratives in East Caucasian -- 2.1 The 'Operating Systems ' of East Caucasian -- 2.2 The deictic space in East Caucasian -- 2.3 The paradigmatic make-up -- 3. The diachrony of DP systems in an 'intermediate' perspective -- 3.1 The East Caucasian language family -- 3.2 Demonstrative pronouns in the intermediate proto-languages -- 4. The DP system of Proto-East Caucasian -- 5. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- ON DOUBLE DATIVE CONSTRUCTIONS IN GEORGIAN -- 1. What double dative constructions are there? -- 2. Why double datives are strange -- 2.1 Formal doubling -- 2.2 Functional doubling -- 2.3 Semantic role doubling -- 3. Explaining the phenomenon: the interface of morpho(phono)logy, syntax, semantics and discourse/pragmatics -- 4. Summary -- REFERENCES -- KARTVELIAN SERIES MARKERS -- 0. Grammatical 'perversity' in Georgian. -- 1. Series markers -- 1.1 The allomorphy of series markers -- 1.2 Series markers in the Georgian dialects -- 1.3 Series markers in Zan and Georgian -- 2. SMs and ablauting verbs -- 3.The series marker -- 4.Group1series markers, passives of state, and the present-perfect stem -- 4.1 Root and derived statives -- 4.2 Statives and present perfects -- 5. The Group 2 series markers -- 5.1 Subgroups of Group 2 series markers -- 5.2 Summary of types of series markers -- 6. Conclusion -- REFERENCES. -- TONE AND PHONEME IN KET -- 1. Ket monosyllabic tones -- 1.1 High toneme -- 1.2 Glottalized toneme -- 1.3 Rising/falling toneme -- 1.4 Falling tone -- 2. Tone and vowel phoneme in Ket monosyllables.
2.1 The status of mid vowels in polysyllabic words -- 3. Pitch in polysyllabic Ket words -- 3.1 Rising/falling tone -- 3.2 The rising/high-falling contour -- 3.3 The phonological status of disyllabic pitch contours -- 4. The phonological phrase -- 5. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- INDEX.
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CURRENT TRENDS IN CAUCASIAN, EAST EUROPEAN AND INNER ASIAN LINGUISTICS -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- INTRODUCTION -- 1. Languages of the Caucasus -- 2. Siberian indigenous languages -- 3. Slavic -- 4. Acknowledgements -- REFERENCES -- FOREWORD -- THE PUBLICATIONS OF HOWARD I. ARONSON -- In Press and Forthcoming -- TOWARDS A PHONOLOGICA L TYPOLOGY OF NATIVE SIBERIA -- 1.m/n/ñ/ŋ -- 2. Initial -- 2.1 Word-initial -- 2.2 in syllable-onset position in non-word-initial syllables -- 2.3 On in the languages of Siberia -- 3. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- ON THE SYNTAX OF POSSESSIVE REFLEXIVE PRONOUNS INMODERN GEORGIAN AND CERTAIN INDO-EUROPEANLANGUAGES -- REFERENCES -- HOW MANY VERB CLASSES ARE THERE IN MINGRELIAN? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General comments on Mingrelian verbal classification -- 3. Various criteria which do not help to distinguish Class 4 -- 4. Areas for further research -- 4.1 Screeve distribution -- 4.2 Animacy of arguments -- 4.3 Work with native consultants -- 5. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- MORE PONTICFURTHER ETYMOLOGIES BETWEEN INDO-EUROPEAN AND NORTHWEST CAUCASIAN -- KEY TO NOTATION -- REFERENCES -- THE BULGARIANS OF MOLDOVA AND THEIR LANGUAGE -- 1. The Bulgarians of Moldova -- 2. Studying the Bulgarian of Moldova -- 3. The Dialectal Membership of Moldovan Bulgarian -- 4. Linguistic Features of the Moldovan Dialects of Bulgarian -- 4.1 Phonology: The vocalic system -- 4.2 Phonology: The consonantal system -- 4.3 Morphology: Divergences from the standard -- 5, Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- LEGALDOCUMENTS -- INTERVIEWS CONDUCTED WITH THE FOLLOWING PERSONS: -- LAKFOLKTALES: MATERIALS FOR A BILINGUAL READER:PART TWO -- 1. Forward -- 2. Introduction -- 3. Abbreviations -- 4. Tale Two -- 5. Vocabulary.

TYPOLOGY OF WRITING, GREEK ALPHABET, AND THEORIGIN OF ALPHABETIC SCRIPTS OF THE CHRISTIAN ORIENT -- 1. Writing as a semiotic system -- 2. The 'Plane of content' and the 'Plane of expression ' of writing -- 3. 'Paradigmatics' and 'Syntagmatics' of writing -- 4. Ancient Greek as an earliest sample of alphabetic writing -- 5. Alphabetic scripts of the Christian Orient -- 6. Alphabetic system - a final stage in the development of writing? -- REFERENCES -- THE CASE FOR DIALECT CONTINUA IN TUNGUSIC PLURAL MORPHOLOGY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Geography and Dialects of Northwest ern Tungusic -- 3. Interpreting the Distribution of Plurals in Northwestern Tungusic -- 4. Dominant Plural Markers -- 5. Secondary Plurals -- 5.1 Kinship terms -- 5.2 Duals and Collectives -- 6. Residual Plurals -- 6.1 Residual plurals in Northwestern Tungusic -- 6.3 Residual plural morphemes in other Tungusic languages -- 7. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- DIALECT/LANGUAGE ABBREVIATIONS USED ON THE MAP"PLURALS IN TUNGUSIC DIALECTS -- INGUSH INFLECTIONAL VERB MORPHOLOGYA SYNCHRONIC CLASSIFICATION AND HISTORICAL ANALYSIS WITH COMPARISON TO CHECHEN -- 0. Introduction -- notation -- 1. Basic verb inflections -- 2. Historical considerations -- 2.1 Historically periphrastic verb tenses built on converbs -- 2.2 Ingush ablaut and its historical origins in umlaut -- 2.3 Stem -Final /-l/ -- 3. Comparison of Ingush and Chechen verb paradigms -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- APPENDIX I: The Ingush sound system VOWELS -- APPENDIX II: Key to Abbreviations -- APPENDIX III: Forms in the Ingush-Chechen cognate database -- THE PREHISTORY OF UDI LOCATIVE CASES AND LOCATIVE PREVERBS -- 1. Locative cases -- 1.1 The system synchronically -- 1.2 On Reconstruction -- 2. Locative preverbs -- 3. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- VOWELS AND VOWEL HARMONY IN NAMANGAN TATAR -- 0. A Note on the term 'Tatar'.

1. Phonetic Descriptions of Standard Literary Tatar -- 2. The Vowels of Namangan Tatar -- 3. Tatar Vowel Harmony Systems -- 3.1 Backness Harmony -- 3.2 Abstractness in Harmony -- 4. Rounding Harmony -- 5. SLT Rounding Harmony -- 6. Summary -- REFERENCES -- THE NAKH-DAGHESTANIAN CONSONANT CORRESPONDENCES -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Proto-Nakh-Daghestanian -- 1.2 Assumptions and conventions -- 1.3 Grammatical preliminaries -- 1.3.1 Gender classes -- 1.3.2 Thematic type -- 1.3.3 Valence -- 2. Basic segmental correspondences and reconstructions -- 2.1 Correspondences and reconstructions -- 2.2 PND st and stt -- 2.3 Additional PND phonemes -- 2.4 Nakh consonants without clear sources -- 3. Morphophonemic canon -- 3.1 Clusters -- 3.2 Gender prefixation -- 3.3 Other prefixes -- 3.4 Initial clusters in Nakh and Xinalug -- 3.5 Labialization -- 3.6 Pharyngealization -- 3.7Ablaut -- 3.8 Thematic vs. athematic declension -- 3.9 Consonant shifting -- 4 The Nakh-Daghestanian family tree -- REFERENCES -- TABLE1. PND CONSONANTS AND THEIR NAKH REFLEXES. -- TABLE2. CONSONANT SHIFTING IN VARIOUS WORDS FORCATTLE. -- TABLE 3. VOICED AFFRICATES IN WORDS FOR CATTLE. -- APPENDIX 1: NAKH AND DAGHESTANIAN CONSONANT CORRESPONDENCES. -- 1.1. PLAIN STOPS AND AFFRICATES -- APPENDIX 1.2. EJECTIVES. -- APPENDIX 1.3. VOICED STOPS AND AFFRICATES -- APPENDIX 1.4. PLAIN FORTIS AFFRICATES AND CLUSTER. -- APPENDIX 1.5. FORTIS EJECTIVE AFFRICATES. -- APPENDIX1.6. VOICELESS FRICATIVES -- APPENDIX 1.7. VOICELESS FRICATIVES. -- APPENDIX 1.8. SONORANTS. -- APPENDIX 2. SELECTED PND COGNATE SETS. -- CONSTRAINTS ON REFLEXIVIZATION IN TSEZ -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 On reflexives -- 1.2 Preliminary information on Tsez -- 2. The expression of reflexivity -- 2.1 Intrinsic reflexives -- 2.2 Reflexive pronouns -- 2.3 Pronouns with the particle -tow -- 3. Compound reflexives: Distribution and locality.

4. Pronouns with the enclitic -tow -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1 Logophors: minimal and extended domains of coreference -- 5.2 The structural and linear position of antecedents -- 6. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- THE DIACHRONY OF DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS IN EASTCAUCASIAN -- 0. Objectives -- 1. Some prerequisites -- 2. The architecture of the paradigms of demonstratives in East Caucasian -- 2.1 The 'Operating Systems ' of East Caucasian -- 2.2 The deictic space in East Caucasian -- 2.3 The paradigmatic make-up -- 3. The diachrony of DP systems in an 'intermediate' perspective -- 3.1 The East Caucasian language family -- 3.2 Demonstrative pronouns in the intermediate proto-languages -- 4. The DP system of Proto-East Caucasian -- 5. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- ON DOUBLE DATIVE CONSTRUCTIONS IN GEORGIAN -- 1. What double dative constructions are there? -- 2. Why double datives are strange -- 2.1 Formal doubling -- 2.2 Functional doubling -- 2.3 Semantic role doubling -- 3. Explaining the phenomenon: the interface of morpho(phono)logy, syntax, semantics and discourse/pragmatics -- 4. Summary -- REFERENCES -- KARTVELIAN SERIES MARKERS -- 0. Grammatical 'perversity' in Georgian. -- 1. Series markers -- 1.1 The allomorphy of series markers -- 1.2 Series markers in the Georgian dialects -- 1.3 Series markers in Zan and Georgian -- 2. SMs and ablauting verbs -- 3.The series marker -- 4.Group1series markers, passives of state, and the present-perfect stem -- 4.1 Root and derived statives -- 4.2 Statives and present perfects -- 5. The Group 2 series markers -- 5.1 Subgroups of Group 2 series markers -- 5.2 Summary of types of series markers -- 6. Conclusion -- REFERENCES. -- TONE AND PHONEME IN KET -- 1. Ket monosyllabic tones -- 1.1 High toneme -- 1.2 Glottalized toneme -- 1.3 Rising/falling toneme -- 1.4 Falling tone -- 2. Tone and vowel phoneme in Ket monosyllables.

2.1 The status of mid vowels in polysyllabic words -- 3. Pitch in polysyllabic Ket words -- 3.1 Rising/falling tone -- 3.2 The rising/high-falling contour -- 3.3 The phonological status of disyllabic pitch contours -- 4. The phonological phrase -- 5. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- INDEX.

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