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Linguistic Categorization : Proceedings of an International Symposium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, April 10-11, 1987.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1989Copyright date: ©1989Description: 1 online resource (356 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027278524
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Linguistic Categorization : Proceedings of an International Symposium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, April 10–11, 1987DDC classification:
  • 401/.43
LOC classification:
  • P128.C37 -- L56 1989eb
Online resources:
Contents:
LINGUISTIC CATEGORIZATION -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- PREFACE -- INTRODUCTION LINGUISTIC AND NON-LINGUISTIC CATEGORIZATION: STRUCTURE AND PROCESS -- 1. The importance of categorization -- 2. Categorization as structure: The nature of cognitive and linguistic categories -- 2.1 Prototype effects in cognition -- 2.2 Prototype effects in language -- 3. Processes operating in categorization -- 3.1 Use of Production Systems -- 3.2 Parallel Distributed Processing -- 4. Language specific categorization -- 5. Summary and conclusions -- Note -- References -- I. PROTOTYPE EFFECTS IN LANGUAGE -- A LEXICAL MODEL OF COLOR SPACE -- 1. The testing -- 1.1 Four unlabelled categories -- 1.2 Red-green-yellow-blue -- 1.3 Red-purple-yellow-blue -- 1.4 Red-orange-yellow-blue -- 1.5 Three unlabelled categories -- 1.6 Red-yellow-blue -- 1.7 Red-green-blue (no yellow) -- 1.8 Red-yellow-green (no blue) -- 1.9 Green-Yellow-Blue (no Red) -- 1.10 Orange-yellow-blue -- 1.11 Red-orange-blue -- 1.12 Red-yellow-orange -- 1.13 Purple-yellow-blue -- 1.14 Red-yellow-purple -- 1.15 Red-purple-blue -- 2. A new model -- 3. Maximal perceptual distance -- Note -- References -- PRELIMINARIES TO A THEORY OF PHONOLOGICAL SUBSTANCE: THE SUBSTANCE OF SONORITY. -- 1. General introduction -- 1.1 Sonority, syllables and other notions -- 1.2 History -- 1.3 The difficulty in defining sonority -- 1.4 Sonority as a prototype category -- 2. Fundamental properties of sonority -- 2.1 Vocalicity/Svara -- 2.2 Voicing -- 2.3 Loudness -- 2.4 Prolongability -- 2.5 Openness -- 3. On the nature of margins - 'antisonority' -- 3.1 The sonority 'slope' -- 3.2 Consonantality -- 3.3 Closure -- 3.4 Silence and hiss -- 4. Sonority and prototypicality -- 5. Individual language analyses -- 5.1 The nature of Greek and Latin onsets -- 5.2 Vowel systems -- 6. Conclusions.
Notes -- References -- CATEGORIZING PHONOLOGICAL SEGMENTS: THE INADEQUACY OF THE SONORITY HIERARCHY -- Notes -- References -- EXPERIMENTALEVIDENCE FOR SYLLABLE-INTERNAL STRUCTURE -- Notes -- References -- PHONOLOGICAL CATEGORIES AND CONSTITUENTS -- References -- ARE THEMATIC RELATIONS DISCRETE? -- 1. Derived nominals -- 1.1 English two-argument nominals -- 1.2 Single argument transitive nominals -- 1.3 Polish derived nominals -- 2. Polish reflexive verbs -- 3. Polish impersonal constructions -- 4. Binding of anaphors in experiential constructions -- 5. Feature based thematic system -- 5.1 The choice of features -- 5.2 Action vs. emotion -- Notes -- References -- CATEGORY RESTRICTIONS IN MARKEDNESS RELATIONS -- Introduction -- 1. Markedness principles and categorial uniformity -- 1.1 Markedness-distribution principle -- 1.2 Hypothesis of differential communicative value -- 1.3 Markedness constraint -- 1.4 Markedness and language acquisition -- 2. Categorial minimality -- 3. Formal and functional minimality -- Notes -- References -- THE ACQUISITION OF THE PAST PARTICIPLE: DISCOURSE-BASED VS. FORM-BASED CATEGORIES -- 1. Methods -- 2. Results -- 3. Discussion -- Notes -- References -- II. CATEGORIZATION PROCESSES -- CATEGORY LEARNING IN A CONNECTIONIST MODEL: LEARNING TO DECLINE THEGERMAN DEFINITE ARTICLE -- 1. Cue learning and cue competition -- 2. Paradigm formation -- 3. Learning in a connectionist architecture -- 4. Simulation I -- 4.1 The training set -- 5. Results for training set items in Simulation I -- 5. Results for training set items in Simulation I -- 5.1 Generalizing the paradigm to old nouns in new contexts -- 5.2 Generalizing the paradigm to new nouns -- 5.3 Comparison to the developmental literature -- 6. Simulation II -- 6.1 Basic results -- 6.2 The impact of cue validity on internal representations.
6.3 The impact of cue validity on new words -- 7. Discussion -- 7.1 Rules vs. networks -- 7.2 The model and the developmental data -- 7.3 The role of lexical items -- 7.4 Directions for future research -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- References -- COMPETITION AND LEXICAL CATEGORIZATION -- 1. Word meaning -- 1.1 Competition between meanings -- 1.2 Competition and cooperation -- 1.3 Locative prepositions - an example -- 1.4 Semantic range and change -- 1.5 Non-semantic cues -- 2. The development of word meaning -- 2.1 Concept formation -- 2.2 Episodic encoding -- 2.3 Segmentation -- 2.4 Cue extraction -- 2.5 Acquiring superordinates -- 3. Polysemy and homonymy -- 3.1 Polysemic topography -- 3.2 Syntactic polysemy -- 3.3 Resolving non-syntactic polysemy -- 3.4 Anaphora as polysemy -- 4. Pushy polysemy -- 4.1 Pushing occurs over valence bridges -- 4.2 Reciprocality -- 4.3 Extension and conversion -- 4.4 Extensional pathways and PDP -- 5. Grammatical entanglement -- 5.1 An example from Hungarian -- 5.2 Extension and reinterpretation -- 6. Summary -- References -- III. CROSS-LINGUISTIC CATEGORIZATION -- A DISCOURSE APPROACH TO THE CROSS-LINGUISTIC CATEGORY 'ADJECTIVE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Dixon's survey -- 3. Time stability -- 4. A discourse explanation -- 5. Conclusions -- Appendix Criteria for determining noun-like or verb-like tendencies for property concept words -- Notes -- References -- PRONOMINALITY: A NOUN-PRONOUN CONTINUUM -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Lexical entries -- 3. Morphological properties -- 4. Semantic properties -- 5. Implicational properties -- 6. Referential properties -- 6.1 Grammatical persons -- 6.2 Grammatical number -- 7. Syntactic properties -- 7.1 Case positions -- 7.2 Co-occurrence properties -- 8. Interpretive conditions -- 9. Summary -- Notes -- References -- ON HUMBOLDT ON THE DUAL -- 1. Humboldt's gift -- 2. Extensions.
3. Notions -- 4. Conceptions -- 5. Dual motivation -- 6. Humboldťs dilemma -- Notes -- References -- AUTHOR INDEX -- LANGUAGE INDEX -- SUBJECT INDEX.
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LINGUISTIC CATEGORIZATION -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- PREFACE -- INTRODUCTION LINGUISTIC AND NON-LINGUISTIC CATEGORIZATION: STRUCTURE AND PROCESS -- 1. The importance of categorization -- 2. Categorization as structure: The nature of cognitive and linguistic categories -- 2.1 Prototype effects in cognition -- 2.2 Prototype effects in language -- 3. Processes operating in categorization -- 3.1 Use of Production Systems -- 3.2 Parallel Distributed Processing -- 4. Language specific categorization -- 5. Summary and conclusions -- Note -- References -- I. PROTOTYPE EFFECTS IN LANGUAGE -- A LEXICAL MODEL OF COLOR SPACE -- 1. The testing -- 1.1 Four unlabelled categories -- 1.2 Red-green-yellow-blue -- 1.3 Red-purple-yellow-blue -- 1.4 Red-orange-yellow-blue -- 1.5 Three unlabelled categories -- 1.6 Red-yellow-blue -- 1.7 Red-green-blue (no yellow) -- 1.8 Red-yellow-green (no blue) -- 1.9 Green-Yellow-Blue (no Red) -- 1.10 Orange-yellow-blue -- 1.11 Red-orange-blue -- 1.12 Red-yellow-orange -- 1.13 Purple-yellow-blue -- 1.14 Red-yellow-purple -- 1.15 Red-purple-blue -- 2. A new model -- 3. Maximal perceptual distance -- Note -- References -- PRELIMINARIES TO A THEORY OF PHONOLOGICAL SUBSTANCE: THE SUBSTANCE OF SONORITY. -- 1. General introduction -- 1.1 Sonority, syllables and other notions -- 1.2 History -- 1.3 The difficulty in defining sonority -- 1.4 Sonority as a prototype category -- 2. Fundamental properties of sonority -- 2.1 Vocalicity/Svara -- 2.2 Voicing -- 2.3 Loudness -- 2.4 Prolongability -- 2.5 Openness -- 3. On the nature of margins - 'antisonority' -- 3.1 The sonority 'slope' -- 3.2 Consonantality -- 3.3 Closure -- 3.4 Silence and hiss -- 4. Sonority and prototypicality -- 5. Individual language analyses -- 5.1 The nature of Greek and Latin onsets -- 5.2 Vowel systems -- 6. Conclusions.

Notes -- References -- CATEGORIZING PHONOLOGICAL SEGMENTS: THE INADEQUACY OF THE SONORITY HIERARCHY -- Notes -- References -- EXPERIMENTALEVIDENCE FOR SYLLABLE-INTERNAL STRUCTURE -- Notes -- References -- PHONOLOGICAL CATEGORIES AND CONSTITUENTS -- References -- ARE THEMATIC RELATIONS DISCRETE? -- 1. Derived nominals -- 1.1 English two-argument nominals -- 1.2 Single argument transitive nominals -- 1.3 Polish derived nominals -- 2. Polish reflexive verbs -- 3. Polish impersonal constructions -- 4. Binding of anaphors in experiential constructions -- 5. Feature based thematic system -- 5.1 The choice of features -- 5.2 Action vs. emotion -- Notes -- References -- CATEGORY RESTRICTIONS IN MARKEDNESS RELATIONS -- Introduction -- 1. Markedness principles and categorial uniformity -- 1.1 Markedness-distribution principle -- 1.2 Hypothesis of differential communicative value -- 1.3 Markedness constraint -- 1.4 Markedness and language acquisition -- 2. Categorial minimality -- 3. Formal and functional minimality -- Notes -- References -- THE ACQUISITION OF THE PAST PARTICIPLE: DISCOURSE-BASED VS. FORM-BASED CATEGORIES -- 1. Methods -- 2. Results -- 3. Discussion -- Notes -- References -- II. CATEGORIZATION PROCESSES -- CATEGORY LEARNING IN A CONNECTIONIST MODEL: LEARNING TO DECLINE THEGERMAN DEFINITE ARTICLE -- 1. Cue learning and cue competition -- 2. Paradigm formation -- 3. Learning in a connectionist architecture -- 4. Simulation I -- 4.1 The training set -- 5. Results for training set items in Simulation I -- 5. Results for training set items in Simulation I -- 5.1 Generalizing the paradigm to old nouns in new contexts -- 5.2 Generalizing the paradigm to new nouns -- 5.3 Comparison to the developmental literature -- 6. Simulation II -- 6.1 Basic results -- 6.2 The impact of cue validity on internal representations.

6.3 The impact of cue validity on new words -- 7. Discussion -- 7.1 Rules vs. networks -- 7.2 The model and the developmental data -- 7.3 The role of lexical items -- 7.4 Directions for future research -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- References -- COMPETITION AND LEXICAL CATEGORIZATION -- 1. Word meaning -- 1.1 Competition between meanings -- 1.2 Competition and cooperation -- 1.3 Locative prepositions - an example -- 1.4 Semantic range and change -- 1.5 Non-semantic cues -- 2. The development of word meaning -- 2.1 Concept formation -- 2.2 Episodic encoding -- 2.3 Segmentation -- 2.4 Cue extraction -- 2.5 Acquiring superordinates -- 3. Polysemy and homonymy -- 3.1 Polysemic topography -- 3.2 Syntactic polysemy -- 3.3 Resolving non-syntactic polysemy -- 3.4 Anaphora as polysemy -- 4. Pushy polysemy -- 4.1 Pushing occurs over valence bridges -- 4.2 Reciprocality -- 4.3 Extension and conversion -- 4.4 Extensional pathways and PDP -- 5. Grammatical entanglement -- 5.1 An example from Hungarian -- 5.2 Extension and reinterpretation -- 6. Summary -- References -- III. CROSS-LINGUISTIC CATEGORIZATION -- A DISCOURSE APPROACH TO THE CROSS-LINGUISTIC CATEGORY 'ADJECTIVE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Dixon's survey -- 3. Time stability -- 4. A discourse explanation -- 5. Conclusions -- Appendix Criteria for determining noun-like or verb-like tendencies for property concept words -- Notes -- References -- PRONOMINALITY: A NOUN-PRONOUN CONTINUUM -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Lexical entries -- 3. Morphological properties -- 4. Semantic properties -- 5. Implicational properties -- 6. Referential properties -- 6.1 Grammatical persons -- 6.2 Grammatical number -- 7. Syntactic properties -- 7.1 Case positions -- 7.2 Co-occurrence properties -- 8. Interpretive conditions -- 9. Summary -- Notes -- References -- ON HUMBOLDT ON THE DUAL -- 1. Humboldt's gift -- 2. Extensions.

3. Notions -- 4. Conceptions -- 5. Dual motivation -- 6. Humboldťs dilemma -- Notes -- References -- AUTHOR INDEX -- LANGUAGE INDEX -- SUBJECT INDEX.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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