Rhetoric in American Anthropology : Gender, Genre, and Science.

By: ApplegarthSeries: Composition, Literacy, and Culture SerPublisher: Pittsburgh PA : University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (280 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822979470Subject(s): Anthropologists’ writings.;Anthropology -- Philosophy.;Ethnology -- History.;Feminist anthropology.;Women anthropologistsGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rhetoric in American Anthropology : Gender, Genre, and ScienceDDC classification: 301.01 LOC classification: GN308Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Gender, Genre, and Knowledge in the Welcoming Science -- 1. Ethnographic Monographs: Genre Change and Rhetorical Scarcity -- 2. Field Autobiographies: Rhetorical Recruitment and Embodied Ethnography -- 3. Folklore Collections: Professional Positions andSituated Representations -- 4. Ethnographic Novels: Educational Critiques and Rhetorical Trajectories -- Conclusion: Rhetorical Archaeology -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: In the early twentieth century, the field of anthropology transformed itself from the "welcoming science," uniquely open to women, people of color, and amateurs, into a professional science of culture. The new field grew in rigor and prestige but excluded practitioners and methods that no longer fit a narrow standard of scientific legitimacy. In Rhetoric in American Anthropology, Risa Applegarth traces the "rhetorical archeology" of this transformation in the writings of early women anthropologists. Applegarth examines the crucial role of ethnographic genres in determining scientific status and recovers the work of marginalized anthropologists who developed alternative forms of scientific writing. Applegarth analyzes scores of ethnographic monographs to demonstrate how early anthropologists intensified the constraints of genre to define their community and limit the aims and methods of their science. But in the 1920s and 1930s, professional researchers sidelined by the academy persisted in challenging the field's boundaries, developing unique rhetorical practices and experimenting with alternative genres that in turn greatly expanded the epistemology of the field. Applegarth demonstrates how these writers' folklore collections, ethnographic novels, and autobiographies of fieldwork experiences reopened debates over how scientific knowledge was made: through what human relationships, by what bodies, and for what ends. Linking early anthropologists' ethnographic strategies to contemporary theories of rhetoric and composition, Rhetoric in American Anthropology provides a fascinating account of the emergence of a new discipline and reveals powerful intersections among gender, genre, and science.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF-N0006269
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP-N0006269
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Gender, Genre, and Knowledge in the Welcoming Science -- 1. Ethnographic Monographs: Genre Change and Rhetorical Scarcity -- 2. Field Autobiographies: Rhetorical Recruitment and Embodied Ethnography -- 3. Folklore Collections: Professional Positions andSituated Representations -- 4. Ethnographic Novels: Educational Critiques and Rhetorical Trajectories -- Conclusion: Rhetorical Archaeology -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

In the early twentieth century, the field of anthropology transformed itself from the "welcoming science," uniquely open to women, people of color, and amateurs, into a professional science of culture. The new field grew in rigor and prestige but excluded practitioners and methods that no longer fit a narrow standard of scientific legitimacy. In Rhetoric in American Anthropology, Risa Applegarth traces the "rhetorical archeology" of this transformation in the writings of early women anthropologists. Applegarth examines the crucial role of ethnographic genres in determining scientific status and recovers the work of marginalized anthropologists who developed alternative forms of scientific writing. Applegarth analyzes scores of ethnographic monographs to demonstrate how early anthropologists intensified the constraints of genre to define their community and limit the aims and methods of their science. But in the 1920s and 1930s, professional researchers sidelined by the academy persisted in challenging the field's boundaries, developing unique rhetorical practices and experimenting with alternative genres that in turn greatly expanded the epistemology of the field. Applegarth demonstrates how these writers' folklore collections, ethnographic novels, and autobiographies of fieldwork experiences reopened debates over how scientific knowledge was made: through what human relationships, by what bodies, and for what ends. Linking early anthropologists' ethnographic strategies to contemporary theories of rhetoric and composition, Rhetoric in American Anthropology provides a fascinating account of the emergence of a new discipline and reveals powerful intersections among gender, genre, and science.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.