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Group Conflict and Political Mobilization in Bahrain and the Arab Gulf : Rethinking the Rentier State.

By: Series: Indiana Series in Middle East StudiesPublisher: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (226 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9780253016867
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Group Conflict and Political Mobilization in Bahrain and the Arab Gulf : Rethinking the Rentier StateDDC classification:
  • 306.2095365
LOC classification:
  • JQ1846.A69P64 2015
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Bahrain, the First Post-Oil State -- 1 Group- Based Political Mobilization in Bahrain and the Arab Gulf -- 2 Al- Fātiḥ wa al- Maftūḥ: The Case of Sunni- Shi'i Relations in Bahrain -- 3 Religion and Politics in Bahrain -- 4 Surveying Bahrain -- 5 Rentier Theory and Rentier Reality -- 6 Political Diversification in the Age of Regime Insecurity -- Appendix -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y.
Summary: The oil-producing states of the Arab Gulf are said to sink or swim on their capacity for political appeasement through economic redistribution. Yet, during the popular uprisings of the Arab Spring, in Bahrain and all across the Arab Gulf, ordinary citizens showed an unexpected enthusiasm for political protest directed against governments widely assumed to have co-opted their support with oil revenues. Justin Gengler draws on the first-ever mass political survey in Bahrain to demonstrate that neither is the state willing to offer all citizens the same bargain, nor are all citizens willing to accept it. Instead, shared social and religious identities offer a viable basis for mass political coordination. Challenging the prevailing rentier interpretation of political life in the Gulf states, Gengler offers new empirical evidence and a new conceptual framework for understanding the attitudes of ordinary citizens.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF-N0005897
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP-N0005897
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Cover -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Bahrain, the First Post-Oil State -- 1 Group- Based Political Mobilization in Bahrain and the Arab Gulf -- 2 Al- Fātiḥ wa al- Maftūḥ: The Case of Sunni- Shi'i Relations in Bahrain -- 3 Religion and Politics in Bahrain -- 4 Surveying Bahrain -- 5 Rentier Theory and Rentier Reality -- 6 Political Diversification in the Age of Regime Insecurity -- Appendix -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y.

The oil-producing states of the Arab Gulf are said to sink or swim on their capacity for political appeasement through economic redistribution. Yet, during the popular uprisings of the Arab Spring, in Bahrain and all across the Arab Gulf, ordinary citizens showed an unexpected enthusiasm for political protest directed against governments widely assumed to have co-opted their support with oil revenues. Justin Gengler draws on the first-ever mass political survey in Bahrain to demonstrate that neither is the state willing to offer all citizens the same bargain, nor are all citizens willing to accept it. Instead, shared social and religious identities offer a viable basis for mass political coordination. Challenging the prevailing rentier interpretation of political life in the Gulf states, Gengler offers new empirical evidence and a new conceptual framework for understanding the attitudes of ordinary citizens.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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