Perspectives on Historical Syntax.

By: Viti, CarlottaSeries: Studies in Language Companion SeriesPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (352 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027268938Subject(s): Grammar, Comparative and general -- Syntax.;Historical linguisticsGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Perspectives on Historical SyntaxDDC classification: 415 LOC classification: P291 -- .P477 2015ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Perspectives on Historical Syntax -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- Historical syntax -- 1. Historical syntax as an emerging field -- 2. Controversial problems of syntactic change and of syntactic reconstruction -- 2.1 Mechanisms of syntactic change -- 2.2 Feasibility of syntactic reconstruction -- 3. Relevance of the present volume for current historical syntax -- 3.1 An interdisciplinary approach -- 3.2 Syntactic change -- 3.3 Syntactic reconstruction -- 3.4 Historical syntax and corpus linguistics -- 3.5 Historical syntax and language contact -- 4. Summary -- References -- Syntactic change -- Manner deixis as source of grammatical markers in Indo-European languages -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic distinctions -- 2.1 Demonstratives -- 2.2 Additional distinctions in the content and in the deictic dimension -- 3. Methodology -- 4. The exophoric use: Loss and renewal -- 5. From exophoric to anaphoric and cataphoric use -- 6. From anaphora to connective -- 7. From cataphoric to quotative -- 8. From endophoric determiner to comparative marker -- 9. From quality deixis to relative clause marker -- 10. Summary and conclusions -- References -- Time for change -- 1. Real times in historical linguistics -- 1.1 Signals from the past, 1: Absolute dating -- 1.2 Signals from the past, 2: Relative dating -- 1.3 Why date at all? -- 1.4 Life expectancy of lexicon and grammar -- 1.4.1 Time-stability -- 1.4.2 Tempo of change -- 2. The tempo of grammaticalisation: From noun to adposition, within 16 generations -- 2.1 French -- 2.2 North Germanic: East and West -- 2.2.1 Continental Scandinavian -- 2.2.2 Insular Scandinavian -- 2.3 Pāli, Sinhalese and Maldivian -- 2.4 Elsewhere -- 2.5 What takes so much time? -- 2.5.1 Social diffusion -- 2.5.2 Composite change -- Acknowledgments -- References.
Syntactic reconstruction -- Reconstructing non-canonical argument structure for Proto-Indo-European -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Background and assumptions of IECASTP -- 1.1 Historical syntax and syntactic reconstruction are worthwhile -- 1.2 Use of the Comparative Method (generally and for syntactic units) -- 1.3 Null-Subjects are no explanation -- 2. Collect predicates that appear in Oblique Subject Constructions -- 3. Classify predicates -- 3.1 "Meaning1" vs. "Meaning2" -- 3.2 Case structure -- 3.3 Part of speech -- 3.4 (Lexical/constructional) diathesis -- 3.5 Etymology -- 4. Determination of PIE etymology -- 4.1 Laryngeal theory -- 4.2 Err on the side of providing a PIE etymology -- 4.3 As a principle, do not be too conservative -- 5. Find root cognates -- 6. Compare/Examine Root Cognate Sets -- 6.1 Compare stem formations -- 6.2 Compare argument marking -- 6.3 Compare semantics -- 6.4 Classify sets as ± likely -- 7. Summary of results thus far -- 7.1 Cognate roots -- 7.2 Proposals -- 7.3 Nature of OSCs -- 7.4 Distribution of OSCs -- 7.5 Polysemy expressed by case frames -- 7.6 Working hypothesis -- 8. Special problems relevant to this work -- 8.1 Basic methodological problem -- 8.2 Problems existing in other comparative works -- 8.3 "New" comparative problems -- 9. (Auto-)suggestions to further test results -- 9.1 Typological comparison of OSCs from non-IE languages -- 9.2 Work on frequency of OSCs (per clause type) at least in some texts -- 10. Conclusions -- References -- An approach to syntactic reconstruction -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General considerations: Prerequisites for reconstructing grammatical and syntactic categories -- 2.1 Defining stage reconstruction and etymological reconstruction -- 2.2 The Historical Comparative Method and syntactic reconstruction -- 2.3 Etymological reconstruction -- 2.4 Individualizing. Creating profiles.
2.5 Probability of a reconstruction. The morphological profile -- 2.6 Functional inheritance -- 3. The case study of the Independent Partitive Genitive: Profiling -- 3.1 Morphological profile -- 3.2 Lexical profile -- 3.3 Semantic profile -- 3.4 Syntactic profile -- 3.4.1 Selection restrictions on the NP (property 1) -- 3.4.2 Selection restrictions on the verb (property 2) -- 3.4.3 Semantic agreement (property 3) -- 3.4.4 Coordination with an otherwise case-marked NP (property 4) -- 3.4.5 No positional restriction (property 5) -- 4. Morphosyntactic changes -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- References -- Anatolian morphosyntax -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Indo-European syntax -- 3. 'Ergativity' in Anatolian -- 4. Enclitic subject pronouns -- 5. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Historical syntax and corpus linguistics -- Treebanks in historical linguistic research -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Traditional corpora -- 3. Treebanks in historical linguistic research -- 4. Case study -- 5. Conclusions and outlook -- References -- Traces of discourse configurationality in older Indo-European languages? -- 0. Preliminaries -- 1. Discourse configurationality -- 2. Method -- 3. Examples for a discourse-configurational word order -- 4. Topic -- 4.1 Old Indian -- 4.2 Ancient Greek -- 4.3 Hittite -- 5. Position of the verb -- 6. Focus -- 7. Subject and topic -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Studying word order changes in Latin -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Aim and scope of the paper -- 1.2 Linear word order and structural ambiguity -- 2. The OV/VO alternation -- 2.1 More object positions -- 2.2 A hypothesis -- 3. VO order in the history of Latin: Reconsidering the facts -- 3.1 OV/VO without controlling for structural ambiguity -- 3.2 OV/VO revisited, with structural ambiguity controlled for -- 3.2.1 A corpus study -- 3.2.2 Results.
3.3 Summary: Continuity rather than change -- 4. Conclusion and directions for future research -- References -- Problematizing syndetic coordination -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Lexical level: Changes in lexical choices, and particle combinations -- 3. Syntactic level: Question of scope, position, and the persistence of apodotic instances -- 4. Semantic and pragmatic level: Implications of 'and' in sense and use -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- What role for inscriptions in the study of syntax and syntactic change in the old Indo-European languages? -- 1. Why (not) use epigraphic material to study syntax and syntactic change? -- 2. The nature of inscriptions: Length, authorship, formulae, direct and indirect attestations, errors and anomalies, layout, bilingualism and registers -- 3. Accessibility -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Editions: -- Secondary Literature: -- Historical syntax and language contact -- The Gulf of Guinea creoles -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The classification of creole languages -- 3. The Gulf of Guinea creoles -- 4. Creoles and syntactic reconstruction -- 5. The GGCs and syntactic reconstruction -- 5.1 NP locative interrogatives -- 5.2 Body-reflexives -- 5.3 Serial verb constructions -- 5.4 Sentence negation -- 5.5 The Noun Phrase -- 5.5.1 Demonstratives -- 5.5.2 Numerals -- 5.5.3 Adjectives -- 6. Final remarks -- References -- Syntactic diversity and change in Austroasiatic languages -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Syntactic diversity and proto-syntax -- 2.1 Clause structures in selected AA languages -- 2.1.1 Verb final -- 2.1.2 Verb medial -- 2.1.3 Verb initial -- 2.1.4 Variable word order -- 2.2 Proto-AA syntax? -- 3. Syntactic change and contact scenarios -- 3.1 Thai and Khmer -- 3.2 Mon and Thai -- 3.3 Mon and Burmese -- 4. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Register of subjects -- Register of Languages.
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Perspectives on Historical Syntax -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- Historical syntax -- 1. Historical syntax as an emerging field -- 2. Controversial problems of syntactic change and of syntactic reconstruction -- 2.1 Mechanisms of syntactic change -- 2.2 Feasibility of syntactic reconstruction -- 3. Relevance of the present volume for current historical syntax -- 3.1 An interdisciplinary approach -- 3.2 Syntactic change -- 3.3 Syntactic reconstruction -- 3.4 Historical syntax and corpus linguistics -- 3.5 Historical syntax and language contact -- 4. Summary -- References -- Syntactic change -- Manner deixis as source of grammatical markers in Indo-European languages -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic distinctions -- 2.1 Demonstratives -- 2.2 Additional distinctions in the content and in the deictic dimension -- 3. Methodology -- 4. The exophoric use: Loss and renewal -- 5. From exophoric to anaphoric and cataphoric use -- 6. From anaphora to connective -- 7. From cataphoric to quotative -- 8. From endophoric determiner to comparative marker -- 9. From quality deixis to relative clause marker -- 10. Summary and conclusions -- References -- Time for change -- 1. Real times in historical linguistics -- 1.1 Signals from the past, 1: Absolute dating -- 1.2 Signals from the past, 2: Relative dating -- 1.3 Why date at all? -- 1.4 Life expectancy of lexicon and grammar -- 1.4.1 Time-stability -- 1.4.2 Tempo of change -- 2. The tempo of grammaticalisation: From noun to adposition, within 16 generations -- 2.1 French -- 2.2 North Germanic: East and West -- 2.2.1 Continental Scandinavian -- 2.2.2 Insular Scandinavian -- 2.3 Pāli, Sinhalese and Maldivian -- 2.4 Elsewhere -- 2.5 What takes so much time? -- 2.5.1 Social diffusion -- 2.5.2 Composite change -- Acknowledgments -- References.

Syntactic reconstruction -- Reconstructing non-canonical argument structure for Proto-Indo-European -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Background and assumptions of IECASTP -- 1.1 Historical syntax and syntactic reconstruction are worthwhile -- 1.2 Use of the Comparative Method (generally and for syntactic units) -- 1.3 Null-Subjects are no explanation -- 2. Collect predicates that appear in Oblique Subject Constructions -- 3. Classify predicates -- 3.1 "Meaning1" vs. "Meaning2" -- 3.2 Case structure -- 3.3 Part of speech -- 3.4 (Lexical/constructional) diathesis -- 3.5 Etymology -- 4. Determination of PIE etymology -- 4.1 Laryngeal theory -- 4.2 Err on the side of providing a PIE etymology -- 4.3 As a principle, do not be too conservative -- 5. Find root cognates -- 6. Compare/Examine Root Cognate Sets -- 6.1 Compare stem formations -- 6.2 Compare argument marking -- 6.3 Compare semantics -- 6.4 Classify sets as ± likely -- 7. Summary of results thus far -- 7.1 Cognate roots -- 7.2 Proposals -- 7.3 Nature of OSCs -- 7.4 Distribution of OSCs -- 7.5 Polysemy expressed by case frames -- 7.6 Working hypothesis -- 8. Special problems relevant to this work -- 8.1 Basic methodological problem -- 8.2 Problems existing in other comparative works -- 8.3 "New" comparative problems -- 9. (Auto-)suggestions to further test results -- 9.1 Typological comparison of OSCs from non-IE languages -- 9.2 Work on frequency of OSCs (per clause type) at least in some texts -- 10. Conclusions -- References -- An approach to syntactic reconstruction -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General considerations: Prerequisites for reconstructing grammatical and syntactic categories -- 2.1 Defining stage reconstruction and etymological reconstruction -- 2.2 The Historical Comparative Method and syntactic reconstruction -- 2.3 Etymological reconstruction -- 2.4 Individualizing. Creating profiles.

2.5 Probability of a reconstruction. The morphological profile -- 2.6 Functional inheritance -- 3. The case study of the Independent Partitive Genitive: Profiling -- 3.1 Morphological profile -- 3.2 Lexical profile -- 3.3 Semantic profile -- 3.4 Syntactic profile -- 3.4.1 Selection restrictions on the NP (property 1) -- 3.4.2 Selection restrictions on the verb (property 2) -- 3.4.3 Semantic agreement (property 3) -- 3.4.4 Coordination with an otherwise case-marked NP (property 4) -- 3.4.5 No positional restriction (property 5) -- 4. Morphosyntactic changes -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- References -- Anatolian morphosyntax -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Indo-European syntax -- 3. 'Ergativity' in Anatolian -- 4. Enclitic subject pronouns -- 5. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Historical syntax and corpus linguistics -- Treebanks in historical linguistic research -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Traditional corpora -- 3. Treebanks in historical linguistic research -- 4. Case study -- 5. Conclusions and outlook -- References -- Traces of discourse configurationality in older Indo-European languages? -- 0. Preliminaries -- 1. Discourse configurationality -- 2. Method -- 3. Examples for a discourse-configurational word order -- 4. Topic -- 4.1 Old Indian -- 4.2 Ancient Greek -- 4.3 Hittite -- 5. Position of the verb -- 6. Focus -- 7. Subject and topic -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Studying word order changes in Latin -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Aim and scope of the paper -- 1.2 Linear word order and structural ambiguity -- 2. The OV/VO alternation -- 2.1 More object positions -- 2.2 A hypothesis -- 3. VO order in the history of Latin: Reconsidering the facts -- 3.1 OV/VO without controlling for structural ambiguity -- 3.2 OV/VO revisited, with structural ambiguity controlled for -- 3.2.1 A corpus study -- 3.2.2 Results.

3.3 Summary: Continuity rather than change -- 4. Conclusion and directions for future research -- References -- Problematizing syndetic coordination -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Lexical level: Changes in lexical choices, and particle combinations -- 3. Syntactic level: Question of scope, position, and the persistence of apodotic instances -- 4. Semantic and pragmatic level: Implications of 'and' in sense and use -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- What role for inscriptions in the study of syntax and syntactic change in the old Indo-European languages? -- 1. Why (not) use epigraphic material to study syntax and syntactic change? -- 2. The nature of inscriptions: Length, authorship, formulae, direct and indirect attestations, errors and anomalies, layout, bilingualism and registers -- 3. Accessibility -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Editions: -- Secondary Literature: -- Historical syntax and language contact -- The Gulf of Guinea creoles -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The classification of creole languages -- 3. The Gulf of Guinea creoles -- 4. Creoles and syntactic reconstruction -- 5. The GGCs and syntactic reconstruction -- 5.1 NP locative interrogatives -- 5.2 Body-reflexives -- 5.3 Serial verb constructions -- 5.4 Sentence negation -- 5.5 The Noun Phrase -- 5.5.1 Demonstratives -- 5.5.2 Numerals -- 5.5.3 Adjectives -- 6. Final remarks -- References -- Syntactic diversity and change in Austroasiatic languages -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Syntactic diversity and proto-syntax -- 2.1 Clause structures in selected AA languages -- 2.1.1 Verb final -- 2.1.2 Verb medial -- 2.1.3 Verb initial -- 2.1.4 Variable word order -- 2.2 Proto-AA syntax? -- 3. Syntactic change and contact scenarios -- 3.1 Thai and Khmer -- 3.2 Mon and Thai -- 3.3 Mon and Burmese -- 4. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Register of subjects -- Register of Languages.

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