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The Linguistics of Temperature.

By: Series: Typological Studies in LanguagePublisher: Amsterdam/Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (948 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027269171
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Linguistics of TemperatureDDC classification:
  • 401/.9
LOC classification:
  • P326.5.P75 -- .L56 2015eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- The Linguistics of Temperature -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of Maps -- Acknowledgements -- Introducing "The linguistics of temperature" -- 1. Why temperature? -- 2. Temperature perception and temperature expressions -- 3. Temperature values -- 4. Frames of temperature evaluation: Tactile, ambient, personal-feeling and non-tactile temperatures -- 5. Classes of evaluated entities -- 6. Basic temperature terms? -- 7. Motivation patterns and semantic extensions relevant to the temperature domain -- 8. Methodology: Setting up the present project -- 9. Final words -- References -- Part 1. Africa -- "Hard sun, hot weather, skin pain" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. "Temperature talk" in Ewe and Likpe -- 2.1 Are there basic temperature terms in Likpe? -- 2.2 Are there basic temperature terms in Ewe? -- 2.3 Summary: Can basic terms be determined? -- 3. The semantics of Ewe hotness and coldness -- 3.1 How to be hot in Ewe -- 3.2 How to be cold in Ewe -- 4. Ambient temperature talk in Ewe -- 5. Talking about aqua temperature -- 5.1 'Skin pain': Pain as a reference point for hotness -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- The semantics and metaphorical extensions of temperature terms in Gurenɛ -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Gur languages and temperature experience in Northern Ghana -- 2.1 Languages and dialects in northern Ghana -- 2.2 The experience of temperature in northern Ghana -- 3. Grammatical sketch and typological features -- 4. Classification of the Temperature Terms in Gurenɛ -- 5. The seasonal temperature cycles and their associated evaluations -- 5.1 Season I (sapɔlegɔ) -- 5.2 Season II (dawɔlegɔ or dawalega) -- 5.3 Season III (kilinkiiŋa) -- 5.4 Season IV (salurego) -- 6. The meanings and uses of the temperature terms -- 6.1 Tactile temperature -- 6.2 Non-tactile temperature.
6.2.1 Personal-feeling temperature perception -- 6.2.2 Ambient temperature perception -- 7. Grammatical characteristics of the temperature terms -- 7.1 Morphological structure -- 7.2 Syntactic constructions that the temperature terms participate in -- 8. Metaphorical extensions of the temperature terms -- 8.1 Metaphorical uses of ma'ɛ 'be cold/cool' -- ma'aserɛ 'cool/wet' -- ma'asega 'cool or cold' -- 8.2 Metaphorical uses of tulegɛ 'be hot', tuulega 'hot', tuulegɔ 'heat' -- 9. Conclusions -- References -- Unravelling temperature terms in Sɛlɛɛ -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Sɛlɛɛ and the Balɛɛ community -- 1.2 Climatic conditions and geography of the area -- 1.3 Methodology -- 2. An overview of the Sɛlɛɛ grammar -- 2. 1 Major word classes in the language -- 2.1.1 Patterns of word class shifts -- 3. The lexicon of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ -- 3.1 Temperature terms in Sɛlɛɛ -- 3.2 Non-central temperature term: kpánkpa and yɔɔ -- 4. The grammatical encoding of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ -- 4. 1 Temperature adjectives -- 4.2 Temperature verbs -- 4.3 Temperature nouns -- 5. Metaphorical expressions related to the temperature domain -- 6. The use of temperature terms in connection with water -- 7. Discussion and conclusions -- References -- Lexicalisation of temperature concepts in Gbaya (an Ubanguian language of C.A.R.) -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word classes and syntactic constructions -- 2.1 Nouns -- 2.2 Verbs -- 2.3 Adjectives -- 2.3.1 Verbal adjectives -- 2.3.2 Ideophonic adjectives -- 3. The different systems of temperature terms -- 3.1 Weather conditions or ambient temperature -- 3.1.1 Cold -- 3.1.2 Heat -- 3.2 Body temperature or personal-feeling -- 3.2.1 Cold body -- 3.2.2 Hot body -- 3.3 The house -- 3.3.1 Cold house -- 3.3.2 Warm house -- 3.4 Food -- 3.4.1 Hot food -- 3.4.2 Cold food -- 3.5 Water -- 3.5.1 Cold water -- 3.5.2 Hot water.
4. Cultural specificities or metaphors -- 4.1 The liver = centre of feelings -- 4.2 Heating up = agitation, excitement and violence -- 4.3 Cooling down = calm and well being -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Climate, temperature and polysemous patterns in French and Wolof -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Temperature, climate and cultural representations of climatic temperatures -- 2.1 Temperature perception, thermal comfort and socio-physiological consequences -- 2.2 Thermal comfort and cultural representations of climatic temperatures -- 3. Presentation of the systems -- 3.1 The French lexical field of predicative terms relating to temperature -- 3.1.1 The three generic temperature terms -- 3.1.2 The specific temperature terms -- 3.2 The Wolof lexical field of predicative terms relating to temperature -- 3.3 Comparison of the systems -- 4. Temperatures and polysemantic patterns -- 4.1 Theoretical frameworks -- 4.2 Polysemous patterns involving the notion of heat -- 4.2.1 In French -- 4.2.2 In Wolof -- 4.3 Polysemantic patterns and neutral temperature terms -- 4.3.1 In French -- 4.3.2 In Wolof -- 4.4 Polysemantic patterns and cold temperature terms -- 4.4.1 In French -- 4.4.2 In Wolof -- 4.5 Comparison -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Temperature terms in selected African languages -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Information about the languages -- 1.2 Methodology -- 2. The temperature terms -- 3. The domains of use of the temperature terms -- 3.1 Category I: Igbo, Kilba, Yoruba -- 3.2 Category II: Bambara, Luyia, Hausa, Kalenjin -- 3.3 Category III: Luo, Moba, Swahili -- 3.4 Category IV: Baoulé -- 3.5 Category V: Ewe, Ngwo -- 3.6 Category VI: Fe'fe' -- 3.7 Similarities across different categories -- 4. Basic temperature terms -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Appendix 2 -- Part 2. Eurasia -- Adjectives of temperature in Latvian -- 1. Introduction.
2. Background and methodology -- 2.1 General information about Latvian -- 2.2 The climate of Latvia -- 2.3 Methodology -- 3. Latvian temperature adjectives: Relevant distinctions -- 4. The distribution of Latvian adjectives across temperature values -- 4.1 Warming temperature -- 4.2 Cooling temperature -- 4.3 Remdens: A neutral temperature term? -- 5. Basic temperature terms -- 7. Semantic shifts in the temperature domain -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- What's hot and what's not in English and Serbian -- 1. Introduction: Aims and scope of the paper -- 2. Temperature adjectives in English and Serbian: A global overview -- 2.1 Adjectival categorisation of the temperature domain -- 2.2 Syntactic contexts involving temperature-related states and properties -- 2.3 Semantic overview: Warming, cooling and intermediate temperature terms -- 2.4 English and Serbian temperature adjectives and the issue of basic temperature terms -- 3. Semantic extensions of English and Serbian temperature adjectives -- 3.1 Temperature-based metaphorical conceptualisation and semantic extensions of temperature terms -- 3.2 Emotions - kind and intensity: Hot, warm, cold -- lukewarm -- 3.3 People and emotional attitudes -- 3.3.1 Disposition: Warm vs Cold -- 3.3.2 Temper/composure: Hot vs. cool /SHladan -- 3.3.3 Arousing desire/interest: Hot vs. cold -- 3.4 Interpersonal relations and social interaction: Warm vs. cold -- 3.5 Intensity of interaction -- danger: Hot -- 3.6 Lack of energy: Lukewarm -- 3.7 Rationality/objectivity/emotional involvement: Cold -- 3.8 Proximity and distance in space/time: Hot, warm, cold -- 3.9 Across perception modalities: Warm, cold, hot -- 3.10 General positive evaluation: E cool -- hot -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- References -- In the warmth of the Ukrainian temperature domain -- 1. Background information -- 1.1 Language location and speakers.
1.2 Climatic conditions -- 1.3 A brief morphosyntactic overview of the Ukrainian language -- 1.4 Data collection and methodology -- 2. The temperature system in Ukrainian -- 2.1 Lexicalisation of temperature intensity -- 2.2 Centrality in the Ukrainian temperature domain -- 3. Sub-domains of temperature experience -- 3.1 Ambient temperature: Outdoors, indoors and with clothes -- 3.2 Touch temperature -- 3.3 Personal-feeling temperature vs. body temperature by touch -- 3.4 Asymmetries across the temperature sub-domains -- 4. Semantic extensions of temperature terms -- 4.1 Temperature terms across perceptual modalities -- 4.2 Temperature of emotions -- 4.3 Temperature extensions to action, time and location -- 4.4 Temperature as the target domain -- 5. Brief discussion -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Asymmetries in Italian temperature terminology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Italian temperature terms -- 2.1 Degrees on the temperature scale -- 2.2 Areas of the scale and types of lexemes -- 3. Domains of temperature -- 3.1 Tactile temperature is a quality of a referent -- 3.2 Ambient temperature is an uncontrolled state of affairs -- 3.3 Personal-feeling temperature is a thing possessed -- 4. A closer look at the intermediate field -- 4.1 Orientation -- 4.2 How hot are tiepido and fresco? -- 5. The origin of the Italian system of temperature terms -- 5.1 The Latin system -- 5.2 Did Latin have a neutral term? -- 5.3 The extremes -- 5.4 The hot and cold areas from Latin to Italian -- 5.5 The origin of fresco -- 6. Concrete, metaphorical and alternative meanings: Distribution in texts -- 7. The extremes -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Temperature terms in Modern Greek* -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 2.1 Language location and climatic conditions -- 2.2 A morphosyntactic sketch of Modern Greek -- 2.3 Greek diglossia and structure of the vocabulary.
3. Methodology.
Summary: The syntactic structures encountered in clauses containing temperature concepts tend to differ from the ones employed in standard intransitive clause types. These constructions are remarkable not only because of their unusual internal makeup, but also because of the great variety in syntactic patterns they exhibit. However, despite the considerable variety in the structure of temperature clauses, identical or near-identical temperature constructions recur in languages around the world with amazing regularity. The present study seeks to explore the reasons for the variety in the structure of temperature predications, as well as the reasons for the frequent recurrence of similar or identical construction types at the cross-linguistic level. The conclusion drawn from the available data is that both phenomena are due to cognitive principles, which allow varying construals of temperature events, but which, because of the universality of these principles, also limit the conceptualization of temperature events to a specific set of possible construals.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF-N0004180
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP-N0004180
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- The Linguistics of Temperature -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of Maps -- Acknowledgements -- Introducing "The linguistics of temperature" -- 1. Why temperature? -- 2. Temperature perception and temperature expressions -- 3. Temperature values -- 4. Frames of temperature evaluation: Tactile, ambient, personal-feeling and non-tactile temperatures -- 5. Classes of evaluated entities -- 6. Basic temperature terms? -- 7. Motivation patterns and semantic extensions relevant to the temperature domain -- 8. Methodology: Setting up the present project -- 9. Final words -- References -- Part 1. Africa -- "Hard sun, hot weather, skin pain" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. "Temperature talk" in Ewe and Likpe -- 2.1 Are there basic temperature terms in Likpe? -- 2.2 Are there basic temperature terms in Ewe? -- 2.3 Summary: Can basic terms be determined? -- 3. The semantics of Ewe hotness and coldness -- 3.1 How to be hot in Ewe -- 3.2 How to be cold in Ewe -- 4. Ambient temperature talk in Ewe -- 5. Talking about aqua temperature -- 5.1 'Skin pain': Pain as a reference point for hotness -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- The semantics and metaphorical extensions of temperature terms in Gurenɛ -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Gur languages and temperature experience in Northern Ghana -- 2.1 Languages and dialects in northern Ghana -- 2.2 The experience of temperature in northern Ghana -- 3. Grammatical sketch and typological features -- 4. Classification of the Temperature Terms in Gurenɛ -- 5. The seasonal temperature cycles and their associated evaluations -- 5.1 Season I (sapɔlegɔ) -- 5.2 Season II (dawɔlegɔ or dawalega) -- 5.3 Season III (kilinkiiŋa) -- 5.4 Season IV (salurego) -- 6. The meanings and uses of the temperature terms -- 6.1 Tactile temperature -- 6.2 Non-tactile temperature.

6.2.1 Personal-feeling temperature perception -- 6.2.2 Ambient temperature perception -- 7. Grammatical characteristics of the temperature terms -- 7.1 Morphological structure -- 7.2 Syntactic constructions that the temperature terms participate in -- 8. Metaphorical extensions of the temperature terms -- 8.1 Metaphorical uses of ma'ɛ 'be cold/cool' -- ma'aserɛ 'cool/wet' -- ma'asega 'cool or cold' -- 8.2 Metaphorical uses of tulegɛ 'be hot', tuulega 'hot', tuulegɔ 'heat' -- 9. Conclusions -- References -- Unravelling temperature terms in Sɛlɛɛ -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Sɛlɛɛ and the Balɛɛ community -- 1.2 Climatic conditions and geography of the area -- 1.3 Methodology -- 2. An overview of the Sɛlɛɛ grammar -- 2. 1 Major word classes in the language -- 2.1.1 Patterns of word class shifts -- 3. The lexicon of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ -- 3.1 Temperature terms in Sɛlɛɛ -- 3.2 Non-central temperature term: kpánkpa and yɔɔ -- 4. The grammatical encoding of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ -- 4. 1 Temperature adjectives -- 4.2 Temperature verbs -- 4.3 Temperature nouns -- 5. Metaphorical expressions related to the temperature domain -- 6. The use of temperature terms in connection with water -- 7. Discussion and conclusions -- References -- Lexicalisation of temperature concepts in Gbaya (an Ubanguian language of C.A.R.) -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word classes and syntactic constructions -- 2.1 Nouns -- 2.2 Verbs -- 2.3 Adjectives -- 2.3.1 Verbal adjectives -- 2.3.2 Ideophonic adjectives -- 3. The different systems of temperature terms -- 3.1 Weather conditions or ambient temperature -- 3.1.1 Cold -- 3.1.2 Heat -- 3.2 Body temperature or personal-feeling -- 3.2.1 Cold body -- 3.2.2 Hot body -- 3.3 The house -- 3.3.1 Cold house -- 3.3.2 Warm house -- 3.4 Food -- 3.4.1 Hot food -- 3.4.2 Cold food -- 3.5 Water -- 3.5.1 Cold water -- 3.5.2 Hot water.

4. Cultural specificities or metaphors -- 4.1 The liver = centre of feelings -- 4.2 Heating up = agitation, excitement and violence -- 4.3 Cooling down = calm and well being -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Climate, temperature and polysemous patterns in French and Wolof -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Temperature, climate and cultural representations of climatic temperatures -- 2.1 Temperature perception, thermal comfort and socio-physiological consequences -- 2.2 Thermal comfort and cultural representations of climatic temperatures -- 3. Presentation of the systems -- 3.1 The French lexical field of predicative terms relating to temperature -- 3.1.1 The three generic temperature terms -- 3.1.2 The specific temperature terms -- 3.2 The Wolof lexical field of predicative terms relating to temperature -- 3.3 Comparison of the systems -- 4. Temperatures and polysemantic patterns -- 4.1 Theoretical frameworks -- 4.2 Polysemous patterns involving the notion of heat -- 4.2.1 In French -- 4.2.2 In Wolof -- 4.3 Polysemantic patterns and neutral temperature terms -- 4.3.1 In French -- 4.3.2 In Wolof -- 4.4 Polysemantic patterns and cold temperature terms -- 4.4.1 In French -- 4.4.2 In Wolof -- 4.5 Comparison -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Temperature terms in selected African languages -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Information about the languages -- 1.2 Methodology -- 2. The temperature terms -- 3. The domains of use of the temperature terms -- 3.1 Category I: Igbo, Kilba, Yoruba -- 3.2 Category II: Bambara, Luyia, Hausa, Kalenjin -- 3.3 Category III: Luo, Moba, Swahili -- 3.4 Category IV: Baoulé -- 3.5 Category V: Ewe, Ngwo -- 3.6 Category VI: Fe'fe' -- 3.7 Similarities across different categories -- 4. Basic temperature terms -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Appendix 2 -- Part 2. Eurasia -- Adjectives of temperature in Latvian -- 1. Introduction.

2. Background and methodology -- 2.1 General information about Latvian -- 2.2 The climate of Latvia -- 2.3 Methodology -- 3. Latvian temperature adjectives: Relevant distinctions -- 4. The distribution of Latvian adjectives across temperature values -- 4.1 Warming temperature -- 4.2 Cooling temperature -- 4.3 Remdens: A neutral temperature term? -- 5. Basic temperature terms -- 7. Semantic shifts in the temperature domain -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- What's hot and what's not in English and Serbian -- 1. Introduction: Aims and scope of the paper -- 2. Temperature adjectives in English and Serbian: A global overview -- 2.1 Adjectival categorisation of the temperature domain -- 2.2 Syntactic contexts involving temperature-related states and properties -- 2.3 Semantic overview: Warming, cooling and intermediate temperature terms -- 2.4 English and Serbian temperature adjectives and the issue of basic temperature terms -- 3. Semantic extensions of English and Serbian temperature adjectives -- 3.1 Temperature-based metaphorical conceptualisation and semantic extensions of temperature terms -- 3.2 Emotions - kind and intensity: Hot, warm, cold -- lukewarm -- 3.3 People and emotional attitudes -- 3.3.1 Disposition: Warm vs Cold -- 3.3.2 Temper/composure: Hot vs. cool /SHladan -- 3.3.3 Arousing desire/interest: Hot vs. cold -- 3.4 Interpersonal relations and social interaction: Warm vs. cold -- 3.5 Intensity of interaction -- danger: Hot -- 3.6 Lack of energy: Lukewarm -- 3.7 Rationality/objectivity/emotional involvement: Cold -- 3.8 Proximity and distance in space/time: Hot, warm, cold -- 3.9 Across perception modalities: Warm, cold, hot -- 3.10 General positive evaluation: E cool -- hot -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- References -- In the warmth of the Ukrainian temperature domain -- 1. Background information -- 1.1 Language location and speakers.

1.2 Climatic conditions -- 1.3 A brief morphosyntactic overview of the Ukrainian language -- 1.4 Data collection and methodology -- 2. The temperature system in Ukrainian -- 2.1 Lexicalisation of temperature intensity -- 2.2 Centrality in the Ukrainian temperature domain -- 3. Sub-domains of temperature experience -- 3.1 Ambient temperature: Outdoors, indoors and with clothes -- 3.2 Touch temperature -- 3.3 Personal-feeling temperature vs. body temperature by touch -- 3.4 Asymmetries across the temperature sub-domains -- 4. Semantic extensions of temperature terms -- 4.1 Temperature terms across perceptual modalities -- 4.2 Temperature of emotions -- 4.3 Temperature extensions to action, time and location -- 4.4 Temperature as the target domain -- 5. Brief discussion -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Asymmetries in Italian temperature terminology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Italian temperature terms -- 2.1 Degrees on the temperature scale -- 2.2 Areas of the scale and types of lexemes -- 3. Domains of temperature -- 3.1 Tactile temperature is a quality of a referent -- 3.2 Ambient temperature is an uncontrolled state of affairs -- 3.3 Personal-feeling temperature is a thing possessed -- 4. A closer look at the intermediate field -- 4.1 Orientation -- 4.2 How hot are tiepido and fresco? -- 5. The origin of the Italian system of temperature terms -- 5.1 The Latin system -- 5.2 Did Latin have a neutral term? -- 5.3 The extremes -- 5.4 The hot and cold areas from Latin to Italian -- 5.5 The origin of fresco -- 6. Concrete, metaphorical and alternative meanings: Distribution in texts -- 7. The extremes -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Temperature terms in Modern Greek* -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 2.1 Language location and climatic conditions -- 2.2 A morphosyntactic sketch of Modern Greek -- 2.3 Greek diglossia and structure of the vocabulary.

3. Methodology.

The syntactic structures encountered in clauses containing temperature concepts tend to differ from the ones employed in standard intransitive clause types. These constructions are remarkable not only because of their unusual internal makeup, but also because of the great variety in syntactic patterns they exhibit. However, despite the considerable variety in the structure of temperature clauses, identical or near-identical temperature constructions recur in languages around the world with amazing regularity. The present study seeks to explore the reasons for the variety in the structure of temperature predications, as well as the reasons for the frequent recurrence of similar or identical construction types at the cross-linguistic level. The conclusion drawn from the available data is that both phenomena are due to cognitive principles, which allow varying construals of temperature events, but which, because of the universality of these principles, also limit the conceptualization of temperature events to a specific set of possible construals.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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