Unmasking Social Science Imperialism : Globalization Theory As a Phase of Academic Colonialism.

By: Mentan, TatahPublisher: Bamenda : Langaa RPCIG, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (442 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789956792214Subject(s): Globalization -- Political aspects -- Africa.;Globalization -- Economic aspects -- Africa.;Neoliberalism -- Africa.;Capitalism -- AfricaGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Unmasking Social Science Imperialism : Globalization Theory As a Phase of Academic ColonialismDDC classification: 327.1 LOC classification: JZ1318 -- .M468 2015ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Cover -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Maps and Figures -- Abbreviations -- Preface -- Chapter 1 - Introductory: Why Social Science Imperialism? -- Introduction -- Evolution of the Concept Globalization -- Key Propositions -- Is Globalization "Westernization"? -- Rationale of Study -- Brief Explanation -- Theoretical Considerations -- What is Imperialism today? -- Why Study Imperialism? -- Domination of Finance -- The US and the World Dollar -- Free Trade as Imperialism -- Imperialism, Capitalism, Technology and Science -- Military Power and Imperialism -- Military Resistance -- Empire and Ideology -- Globalization as Westernization -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2 - Social Science, Eurocentrism, Americanization, and Imperialism -- Overview -- Introduction -- Historical evolution of social science studies -- Conceptual and Theoretical Issues of Interdisciplinary Studies -- Contradictions of Specialization -- Examples of sociological narrowness and imperialism -- Why postdisciplinary studies and the need to become a social scientist? -- The Politics of Academic Studies: 1900 - 1945 -- The Cold War: The Ascendancy of Specialization -- Specialized Academic Disciplines as Vehicles for Cultural Imperialism -- Class Power and Rise and Fall of Academic Paradigms -- Challenges of Political Realities and Myths of Autonomy of Social Sciences -- Rise of Variants of Inter-Disciplinary Studies: Corporate or Critical? -- Critique of Neo- Liberal "Interdisciplinary Studies" -- Some Entailments of Theorizing -- Theorizing the "Other" -- Eurocentric Social Science=Imperialism? -- Social Sciences, Eurocentrism and Imperialism -- Two different societies -- Absence of objectivity -- Uniform educational diet? -- Conclusion: Objectivity and Political Commitment -- Bibliography -- Chapter 3 - Dissecting Globalization as a Scientific Theory.
Overview -- Introduction -- Background to Neoliberal Globalization Theory -- Globalization Theory -- Uneven Scientism and Neoliberal Regulation -- Globalization Theory and Experience -- Capitalism, free markets, instability and division -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Chapter 4 - Globalization Theory as Repackaged Social Science Imperialism -- Overview -- Introduction -- Background: Globalization Was Imposed, Not 'Evolved' -- Globalization as a False Theory -- A Global Market? -- In the real world -- Combined and uneven development -- Global capital -- Globalization and development -- Global inequality -- Debunking the "great" myths of globalization -- Globalization: Myths and Realities -- Footloose capital? -- Is globalization to blame for lost jobs in U.S.? -- Fighting the job killers -- Socialism or Reform of Capitalism? -- The State of the State -- The State in Global Politics -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5 - Toward De-linking From Globalization by the Oppressed and Exploited -- Overview -- Introduction -- The Globalization Apostles' Creed -- Globalization for Whom? -- Globalisation = cultural, political & economic imperialism -- Globalization is a Huge Problem -- 'Another World is Possible' -- Economic Growth -- Free Trade -- Liberalization -- Deregulation -- Privatization -- Developing Countries -- The Strategy of the Transition -- Bibliography -- Epilogue - Which Way for Oppressed and Exploited People? -- Overview -- Chapter 6 - The Elusive Scientific (Theoretical) Land of Promise -- Introduction -- The Rise of Globalist Ideology -- Globalization as False Science: Theory and Practice -- The Myth of Globalization -- Neoliberalism and the "Antiglobalization Movement" -- Narratives of Globalization and Democracy -- Liberalization Works"? Corporate Globalization and Democracy -- Anticorporate Globalization and Democracy.
The Securitization of Protest -- Conclusion: Globalization/Antiglobalization and the Future of Democracy -- Bibliography -- Chapter 7 - The Road to Scientific Paradise -- Overview -- Introduction -- Revisiting Theorizing Globalization -- Some Instructive Dialogues on Globalization -- Class Science and Scientific Truth -- Science and Colonialism -- Science as Part of Culture -- Class Science and Scientific Insight -- Newtonian Physics -- Time and Space -- Similarity and Difference -- Evolution -- Dialectical Materialism -- The Law of the Excluded Middle -- The Social and the Biological -- Environmental Struggles -- The Battle around Science -- Discussion -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Back cover.
Summary: Contemporary social science is a product of the capitalist world-system and Eurocentrism is constitutive of the geoculture of this system characterized by the parochiality of its universalism, assumptions about the superiority of Western civilization and imposition as the sole theory of global progress. The creation of these structures of knowledge, specifically the institutionalization of the social sciences, is a phenomenon that is inextricably linked to the very formation and maturation of Europe�s capitalist world system or imperialism. There is therefore nothing that is natural, logical, or accidental about the institutionalization of the social sciences. These Europeanized structures of knowledge are imposed ways of producing knowledge of the world. This Eurocentrism of social science has justifiably come under increasingly vigorous scrutiny, especially in the period since 1945 with the formal decolonization of Africa, Asia, and much of the Caribbean. This book forcefully argues that if social science is to make any progress in the twenty-first century, it must overcome its Eurocentric heritage that has distorted social analyses and its capacity to deal with the problems of the contemporary world and embrace other non-Western funds of knowledge production.
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Cover -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Maps and Figures -- Abbreviations -- Preface -- Chapter 1 - Introductory: Why Social Science Imperialism? -- Introduction -- Evolution of the Concept Globalization -- Key Propositions -- Is Globalization "Westernization"? -- Rationale of Study -- Brief Explanation -- Theoretical Considerations -- What is Imperialism today? -- Why Study Imperialism? -- Domination of Finance -- The US and the World Dollar -- Free Trade as Imperialism -- Imperialism, Capitalism, Technology and Science -- Military Power and Imperialism -- Military Resistance -- Empire and Ideology -- Globalization as Westernization -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2 - Social Science, Eurocentrism, Americanization, and Imperialism -- Overview -- Introduction -- Historical evolution of social science studies -- Conceptual and Theoretical Issues of Interdisciplinary Studies -- Contradictions of Specialization -- Examples of sociological narrowness and imperialism -- Why postdisciplinary studies and the need to become a social scientist? -- The Politics of Academic Studies: 1900 - 1945 -- The Cold War: The Ascendancy of Specialization -- Specialized Academic Disciplines as Vehicles for Cultural Imperialism -- Class Power and Rise and Fall of Academic Paradigms -- Challenges of Political Realities and Myths of Autonomy of Social Sciences -- Rise of Variants of Inter-Disciplinary Studies: Corporate or Critical? -- Critique of Neo- Liberal "Interdisciplinary Studies" -- Some Entailments of Theorizing -- Theorizing the "Other" -- Eurocentric Social Science=Imperialism? -- Social Sciences, Eurocentrism and Imperialism -- Two different societies -- Absence of objectivity -- Uniform educational diet? -- Conclusion: Objectivity and Political Commitment -- Bibliography -- Chapter 3 - Dissecting Globalization as a Scientific Theory.

Overview -- Introduction -- Background to Neoliberal Globalization Theory -- Globalization Theory -- Uneven Scientism and Neoliberal Regulation -- Globalization Theory and Experience -- Capitalism, free markets, instability and division -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Chapter 4 - Globalization Theory as Repackaged Social Science Imperialism -- Overview -- Introduction -- Background: Globalization Was Imposed, Not 'Evolved' -- Globalization as a False Theory -- A Global Market? -- In the real world -- Combined and uneven development -- Global capital -- Globalization and development -- Global inequality -- Debunking the "great" myths of globalization -- Globalization: Myths and Realities -- Footloose capital? -- Is globalization to blame for lost jobs in U.S.? -- Fighting the job killers -- Socialism or Reform of Capitalism? -- The State of the State -- The State in Global Politics -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5 - Toward De-linking From Globalization by the Oppressed and Exploited -- Overview -- Introduction -- The Globalization Apostles' Creed -- Globalization for Whom? -- Globalisation = cultural, political & economic imperialism -- Globalization is a Huge Problem -- 'Another World is Possible' -- Economic Growth -- Free Trade -- Liberalization -- Deregulation -- Privatization -- Developing Countries -- The Strategy of the Transition -- Bibliography -- Epilogue - Which Way for Oppressed and Exploited People? -- Overview -- Chapter 6 - The Elusive Scientific (Theoretical) Land of Promise -- Introduction -- The Rise of Globalist Ideology -- Globalization as False Science: Theory and Practice -- The Myth of Globalization -- Neoliberalism and the "Antiglobalization Movement" -- Narratives of Globalization and Democracy -- Liberalization Works"? Corporate Globalization and Democracy -- Anticorporate Globalization and Democracy.

The Securitization of Protest -- Conclusion: Globalization/Antiglobalization and the Future of Democracy -- Bibliography -- Chapter 7 - The Road to Scientific Paradise -- Overview -- Introduction -- Revisiting Theorizing Globalization -- Some Instructive Dialogues on Globalization -- Class Science and Scientific Truth -- Science and Colonialism -- Science as Part of Culture -- Class Science and Scientific Insight -- Newtonian Physics -- Time and Space -- Similarity and Difference -- Evolution -- Dialectical Materialism -- The Law of the Excluded Middle -- The Social and the Biological -- Environmental Struggles -- The Battle around Science -- Discussion -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Back cover.

Contemporary social science is a product of the capitalist world-system and Eurocentrism is constitutive of the geoculture of this system characterized by the parochiality of its universalism, assumptions about the superiority of Western civilization and imposition as the sole theory of global progress. The creation of these structures of knowledge, specifically the institutionalization of the social sciences, is a phenomenon that is inextricably linked to the very formation and maturation of Europe�s capitalist world system or imperialism. There is therefore nothing that is natural, logical, or accidental about the institutionalization of the social sciences. These Europeanized structures of knowledge are imposed ways of producing knowledge of the world. This Eurocentrism of social science has justifiably come under increasingly vigorous scrutiny, especially in the period since 1945 with the formal decolonization of Africa, Asia, and much of the Caribbean. This book forcefully argues that if social science is to make any progress in the twenty-first century, it must overcome its Eurocentric heritage that has distorted social analyses and its capacity to deal with the problems of the contemporary world and embrace other non-Western funds of knowledge production.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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