The Semantics of Chinese Music : Analysing selected Chinese musical concepts.

By: Tien, AdrianSeries: Cognitive Linguistic Studies in Cultural ContextsPublisher: Amsterdam/Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (321 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027268914Subject(s): Music -- China -- Philosophy and aesthetics.;Music and language -- China.;Qin music -- China -- Analysis, appreciationGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Semantics of Chinese Music : Analysing selected Chinese musical conceptsDDC classification: 781.1/70951 LOC classification: ML3877 -- .T55 2015ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- The Semantics of Chinese Music -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Tables and figures -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 What musical concepts? -- 1.1.1 Musical concepts as cultural key words? -- 1.1.2 Musical concepts and domain-specificity -- 1.2 Musical "meaning" in academic discussions since the 20th Century -- 1.3 Musical "meaning" in linguistic discussions since the 20th Century -- 1.3.1 Cognitive semantic approach -- 1.3.2 Semiotic approach -- 1.4 Analysing and discussing Chinese musical concepts -- 1.4.1 Analysing Chinese musical concepts using the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) -- 1.4.1.1 Semantic molecules -- 1.4.1.2 Cultural script -- 1.4.1.3 Application or applicability of the NSM to analysing Chinese musical concepts -- 1.4.1.4 Core versus peripheral meaning in NSM analyses -- 1.4.1.5 The "sememe" in Chinese lexicon and its implication for NSM analyses -- 1.5 Chinese music and Chinese language: a case of pas de deux -- 1.6 Chapter plan -- 2. "Where Have the Geese Gone?": Chinese concepts related to sonic experience -- 2.1 Chinese interpretation of sonic presence ("sound") and sonic absence ("non-sound") -- 2.2 Chinese concepts related to sonic presence ("sound" and "music") -- 2.2.1 Sheng -- 2.2.2 Yin -- 2.2.3 Yin yue 樂 and yue 樂 -- 2.2.4 Compound words between sheng, yin and yue -- 2.2.5 Qu 曲 -- 2.3 Chinese concepts related to sonic absence ("non-sound") -- 2.3.1 Jing -- 2.3.2 Mo -- 2.3.3 Ji 寂 -- 2.3.4 Xiu 休 -- 2.4 Concluding remarks -- 3. "Following one's intonation": Concepts related to musical articulation, interpretation -- 3.1 Yiyang duncuo 抑揚 挫 -- 3.2 Yun -- 3.3 Shi 實 versus xu -- 3.4 Nong 濃 versus dan 淡 -- 3.5 Conclusion -- 4. Being "graceful", "well-moderated" and "restrained": concepts related to expressions of music.
4.1 Emotion words and emotional musical concepts -- 4.2 Emotional, musical concepts weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue, hanxu and daqi -- 4.2.1 Weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue, hanxu and daqi: their semantic and translational issues -- 4.2.2 Cultural underpinnings of weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue and hanxu -- 4.2.2.1 Indirect expressions of emotions -- 4.2.2.2 Indirect and implicit expressions of emotions -- 4.2.2.3 Indirect and restrained expressions of emotions -- 4.2.2.4 Expressions of emotions: two important provisos -- 4.2.3 Semantic analyses of weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue, hanxu and daqi -- 4.2.3.1 Weiwan 委婉 -- 4.2.3.2 Wanzhuan 婉 -- 4.2.3.3 Wanyue 婉約 -- 4.2.3.4 Hanxu 含 -- 4.2.3.5 Daqi 大氣 -- 4.3 Conclusion -- 5. Interpreting Guqin Master Xu's "24 virtues" with NSM -- 5.1 Preliminaries -- 5.1.1 Guqin aesthetics as a significant dimension of Chinese musical aesthetics -- 5.1.2 The 24 guqin concepts by Master Xu as a representative dimension of guqin aesthetics -- 5.1.3 Taking stock of the 24 guqin concepts as "virtues of guqin music" -- 5.2 Semantic analyses of the "24 virtues of guqin music" -- 5.2.1 He 和 'harmonious' -- 5.2.2 Jing 'quiet, silent, tranquil, still' -- 5.2.3 Qing 清 'clear, pure' -- 5.2.4 Yuan 'distant, far and profound' -- 5.2.5 Gu 古 'ancient, archaic, nostalgic' -- 5.2.6 Dan 澹/淡 'placid, plain, simple, quiet, unsophisticated' -- 5.2.7 Tian 恬 'calm, peaceful, tranquil, serene' -- 5.2.8 Yi 'leisurely' -- 5.2.9 Ya 'exquisite, elegant, graceful, refined' -- 5.2.10 Li 'beautiful' -- 5.2.11 Liang 亮 'bright, resonant, transparent, clear' -- 5.2.12 Cai 'luminous, lustrous' -- 5.2.13 Jie 潔 'clean' -- 5.2.14 Run 潤 'warm, moist, moderate, smooth, sleek' -- 5.2.15 Yuan 圓 'well-rounded, seamless, unblemished, immaculate' -- 5.2.16 Jian 堅 'firm, solid, strong' -- 5.2.17 Hong 宏 'grand, impressive, magnaminous' -- 5.2.18 Xi 細 'fine, minute, subtle'.
5.2.19 Liu 溜 'gliding, slippery' -- 5.2.20 Jian 健 'lively, energetic' -- 5.2.21 Qing 'light, soft' -- 5.2.22 Zhong 'heavy, weighty, strong' -- 5.2.23 Chi 'slow, delayed' -- 5.2.24 Su 'swiftly, rapidly' -- 5.3 Conclusion -- 6. Conclusion -- 6.1 "Musical meaning" revisited -- 6.2 Appreciating Chinese music with the mind's ear -- 6.3 Appreciating Chinese music with the mind's eye -- 6.4 Musicking -- 6.5 Chinese musical, linguistic and literary concepts -- 6.6 The main findings -- 6.7 Outstanding issues -- 6.8 Suggestions for further research -- Appendix I. Xi Shan Qin Kuang 溪山琴況 'The State of Guqin Art of the Xi Shan School' -- References -- Index.
Summary: Music is a widely enjoyed human experience. It is, therefore, natural that we have wanted to describe, document, analyse and, somehow, grasp it in language. This book surveys a representative selection of musical concepts in Chinese language, i.e. words that describe, or refer to, aspects of Chinese music. Important as these musical concepts are in the language, they have been in wide circulation since ancient times without being subjected to any serious semantic analysis. The current study is the first known attempt at analysing these Chinese musical concepts linguistically, adopting the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) approach to formulate semantically and cognitively rigorous explications. Readers will be able to better understand not only these musical concepts but also significant aspects of the Chinese culture which many of these musical concepts represent. This volume contributes to the fields of cognitive linguistics, semantics, music, musicology and Chinese studies, offering readers a fresh account of Chinese ways of thinking, not least Chinese ways of viewing or appreciating music. Ultimately, this study represents trailblazing research on the relationship between language, culture and cognition.
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Intro -- The Semantics of Chinese Music -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Tables and figures -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 What musical concepts? -- 1.1.1 Musical concepts as cultural key words? -- 1.1.2 Musical concepts and domain-specificity -- 1.2 Musical "meaning" in academic discussions since the 20th Century -- 1.3 Musical "meaning" in linguistic discussions since the 20th Century -- 1.3.1 Cognitive semantic approach -- 1.3.2 Semiotic approach -- 1.4 Analysing and discussing Chinese musical concepts -- 1.4.1 Analysing Chinese musical concepts using the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) -- 1.4.1.1 Semantic molecules -- 1.4.1.2 Cultural script -- 1.4.1.3 Application or applicability of the NSM to analysing Chinese musical concepts -- 1.4.1.4 Core versus peripheral meaning in NSM analyses -- 1.4.1.5 The "sememe" in Chinese lexicon and its implication for NSM analyses -- 1.5 Chinese music and Chinese language: a case of pas de deux -- 1.6 Chapter plan -- 2. "Where Have the Geese Gone?": Chinese concepts related to sonic experience -- 2.1 Chinese interpretation of sonic presence ("sound") and sonic absence ("non-sound") -- 2.2 Chinese concepts related to sonic presence ("sound" and "music") -- 2.2.1 Sheng -- 2.2.2 Yin -- 2.2.3 Yin yue 樂 and yue 樂 -- 2.2.4 Compound words between sheng, yin and yue -- 2.2.5 Qu 曲 -- 2.3 Chinese concepts related to sonic absence ("non-sound") -- 2.3.1 Jing -- 2.3.2 Mo -- 2.3.3 Ji 寂 -- 2.3.4 Xiu 休 -- 2.4 Concluding remarks -- 3. "Following one's intonation": Concepts related to musical articulation, interpretation -- 3.1 Yiyang duncuo 抑揚 挫 -- 3.2 Yun -- 3.3 Shi 實 versus xu -- 3.4 Nong 濃 versus dan 淡 -- 3.5 Conclusion -- 4. Being "graceful", "well-moderated" and "restrained": concepts related to expressions of music.

4.1 Emotion words and emotional musical concepts -- 4.2 Emotional, musical concepts weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue, hanxu and daqi -- 4.2.1 Weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue, hanxu and daqi: their semantic and translational issues -- 4.2.2 Cultural underpinnings of weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue and hanxu -- 4.2.2.1 Indirect expressions of emotions -- 4.2.2.2 Indirect and implicit expressions of emotions -- 4.2.2.3 Indirect and restrained expressions of emotions -- 4.2.2.4 Expressions of emotions: two important provisos -- 4.2.3 Semantic analyses of weiwan, wanzhuan, wanyue, hanxu and daqi -- 4.2.3.1 Weiwan 委婉 -- 4.2.3.2 Wanzhuan 婉 -- 4.2.3.3 Wanyue 婉約 -- 4.2.3.4 Hanxu 含 -- 4.2.3.5 Daqi 大氣 -- 4.3 Conclusion -- 5. Interpreting Guqin Master Xu's "24 virtues" with NSM -- 5.1 Preliminaries -- 5.1.1 Guqin aesthetics as a significant dimension of Chinese musical aesthetics -- 5.1.2 The 24 guqin concepts by Master Xu as a representative dimension of guqin aesthetics -- 5.1.3 Taking stock of the 24 guqin concepts as "virtues of guqin music" -- 5.2 Semantic analyses of the "24 virtues of guqin music" -- 5.2.1 He 和 'harmonious' -- 5.2.2 Jing 'quiet, silent, tranquil, still' -- 5.2.3 Qing 清 'clear, pure' -- 5.2.4 Yuan 'distant, far and profound' -- 5.2.5 Gu 古 'ancient, archaic, nostalgic' -- 5.2.6 Dan 澹/淡 'placid, plain, simple, quiet, unsophisticated' -- 5.2.7 Tian 恬 'calm, peaceful, tranquil, serene' -- 5.2.8 Yi 'leisurely' -- 5.2.9 Ya 'exquisite, elegant, graceful, refined' -- 5.2.10 Li 'beautiful' -- 5.2.11 Liang 亮 'bright, resonant, transparent, clear' -- 5.2.12 Cai 'luminous, lustrous' -- 5.2.13 Jie 潔 'clean' -- 5.2.14 Run 潤 'warm, moist, moderate, smooth, sleek' -- 5.2.15 Yuan 圓 'well-rounded, seamless, unblemished, immaculate' -- 5.2.16 Jian 堅 'firm, solid, strong' -- 5.2.17 Hong 宏 'grand, impressive, magnaminous' -- 5.2.18 Xi 細 'fine, minute, subtle'.

5.2.19 Liu 溜 'gliding, slippery' -- 5.2.20 Jian 健 'lively, energetic' -- 5.2.21 Qing 'light, soft' -- 5.2.22 Zhong 'heavy, weighty, strong' -- 5.2.23 Chi 'slow, delayed' -- 5.2.24 Su 'swiftly, rapidly' -- 5.3 Conclusion -- 6. Conclusion -- 6.1 "Musical meaning" revisited -- 6.2 Appreciating Chinese music with the mind's ear -- 6.3 Appreciating Chinese music with the mind's eye -- 6.4 Musicking -- 6.5 Chinese musical, linguistic and literary concepts -- 6.6 The main findings -- 6.7 Outstanding issues -- 6.8 Suggestions for further research -- Appendix I. Xi Shan Qin Kuang 溪山琴況 'The State of Guqin Art of the Xi Shan School' -- References -- Index.

Music is a widely enjoyed human experience. It is, therefore, natural that we have wanted to describe, document, analyse and, somehow, grasp it in language. This book surveys a representative selection of musical concepts in Chinese language, i.e. words that describe, or refer to, aspects of Chinese music. Important as these musical concepts are in the language, they have been in wide circulation since ancient times without being subjected to any serious semantic analysis. The current study is the first known attempt at analysing these Chinese musical concepts linguistically, adopting the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) approach to formulate semantically and cognitively rigorous explications. Readers will be able to better understand not only these musical concepts but also significant aspects of the Chinese culture which many of these musical concepts represent. This volume contributes to the fields of cognitive linguistics, semantics, music, musicology and Chinese studies, offering readers a fresh account of Chinese ways of thinking, not least Chinese ways of viewing or appreciating music. Ultimately, this study represents trailblazing research on the relationship between language, culture and cognition.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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