Causation, Permission, and Transfer : Argument realisation in GET, TAKE, PUT, GIVE and LET verbs.

By: Nolan, BrianContributor(s): Rawoens, Gudrun | Diedrichsen, ElkeSeries: Studies in Language Companion SeriesPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (505 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027268976Subject(s): Causative (Linguistics);Grammar, Comparative and general -- Verb.;Principles and parameters (Linguistics);Generative grammarGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Causation, Permission, and Transfer : Argument realisation in GET, TAKE, PUT, GIVE and LET verbsDDC classification: 415/.6 LOC classification: P292 -- .C36 2015ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Causation, Permission, and Transfer -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- References -- Chapter 1. Encoding transfer, let/allow and permission in Modern Irish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Transfer constructions -- 3. Give_permission constructions -- 4. Get_Permission to achieve a particular purpose -- 5. Let_allow constructions -- 6. Permit constructions -- 7. Discussion -- References -- Chapter 2. Degrees of causativity in German lassen causative constructions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Other construction types with lassen in German -- 3. The syntax and semantics of causatives in a cross-linguistic perspective -- 4. Lassen constructions in German: Syntax, argument structure, meaning variants and the impact of cu -- 5. Summary and conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3. Grammaticalization of 'give' in Slavic between drift and contact -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Literal 'give' in Slavic -- 3. Causatives and related constructions -- 4. Modal constructions -- 5. Imperative constructions -- 6. Peripheral constructions -- 7. Concluding remarks -- Corpora -- References -- Chapter 4. 'Give' and semantic maps -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Testing the notion of 'semantic distance' on 'give' -- 3. Zeugma and intermediate uses of 'give' -- 4. Gradience of acceptability of a paraphrase -- 5. Analogy and semantic map of 'give' uses -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5. How Europeans GIVE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The category GIVE and linguistic strategies of expressing it -- 3. Data and methods -- 4. Quantitative analyses -- 5. Summary and outlook -- References -- Chapter 6. Ditransitive constructions in Gan Chinese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. GIVE in Mandarin and Gan Chinese: A contrastive look -- 3. Emergence of inverted DOC -- 4. Valency increasing and preposition incorporation -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References.
Chapter 7. The argument realisation of give and take verbs in Māori -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Give verbs in Māori -- 3. Take verbs in Māori -- 4. Give, take and Māori case-system -- 5. Conclusion -- List of abbreviations -- References -- Chapter 8. GIVE and its arguments in Bohairic Coptic -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Differential Goal Marking: n-/na= vs. e-/ero= as markers of the third argument -- 3. Variations on a Theme -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Chapter 9. Giving is receiving -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background on Shaowu -- 3. Origin and polysemy of the lexical morpheme [tie53] -- 4. From GET to GIVE -- 5. Concluding remarks -- Abbreviations -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 10. Enabling and allowing in Hebrew -- 1. Introduction: Hebrew Three Argument Dative constructions -- 2. Usage-Based Construction Grammar -- 3. Data and method -- 4. Results and discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11. Low-level patterning of pronominal subjects and verb tenses in English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Corpora used in this study -- 3. Methodology -- 4. Low-level patterning with GIVE-type verbs -- 5. Subjectivity in give-type verbs -- 6. Concluding remarks -- Abbreviations -- References -- Appendix -- Chapter 12. The morphological, syntactic and semantic interface of the verb GIVE in Lithuanian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Framework, data and methodology -- 3. The meaning of the verb GIVE in Lithuanian -- 4. Morpho-syntactic characteristics of Lithuanian verb GIVE -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Chapter 13. Rise and fall of the take-future in written Estonian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Etymology, basic meaning and grammaticalization of the verb võtma 'take' and the construction V(q -- 3. Vernacular origin of the construction võtma + Vinf1 -- 4. Old Written Estonian.
5. Corpus study of the construction võtma + Vinf1 -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- Data sources -- References -- Chapter 14. Causation in the Australian dialects Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara -- 1. Australian languages -- 2. Causation seen through Role and Reference Grammar -- 3. Pitjantjatjara/Yankunytjatjara verbs and nominals -- 4. Causation: Definitions and description of the phenomena -- 5. Multiple verb constructions -- 6. The three causative types of compact/and/purp -- 7. Concluding discussion -- Abbreviations -- Pronouns -- References -- Chapter 15. The fare causative derivation in Italian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Problematic claims from the literature -- 3. The Italian fare derivation in the wider typological context -- 4. Derivation schemas for Italian fare-causatives -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 16. Information-structural encoding of recipient in non-canonical alignments of Persian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Persian monotransitive alignments -- 3. The ditransitive alignment with OBJ in Persian -- 4. Non-canonical ditransitives: A constructional account -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References -- Index.
Summary: This chapter aims to study the prepositional marking and the postpositional marking of the recipient in the Persian non-canonical ditransitive alignments, which are associated respectively with a particular role that the recipient as topic or exhaustive focus plays in the information-structural representation of the benefactive event. I will argue that overriding of the theme and recipient by each other with respect to topicality, grammatically achieved by utilizing two distinct operations including preposing and left-dislocation, determines the intended grammatical marking of the recipient. Moreover, the pragmatic alternation between the two types of coding portrays a constructional pattern which will be accounted for in terms of a Role and Reference Grammar (RRG) framework.
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Causation, Permission, and Transfer -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- References -- Chapter 1. Encoding transfer, let/allow and permission in Modern Irish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Transfer constructions -- 3. Give_permission constructions -- 4. Get_Permission to achieve a particular purpose -- 5. Let_allow constructions -- 6. Permit constructions -- 7. Discussion -- References -- Chapter 2. Degrees of causativity in German lassen causative constructions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Other construction types with lassen in German -- 3. The syntax and semantics of causatives in a cross-linguistic perspective -- 4. Lassen constructions in German: Syntax, argument structure, meaning variants and the impact of cu -- 5. Summary and conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3. Grammaticalization of 'give' in Slavic between drift and contact -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Literal 'give' in Slavic -- 3. Causatives and related constructions -- 4. Modal constructions -- 5. Imperative constructions -- 6. Peripheral constructions -- 7. Concluding remarks -- Corpora -- References -- Chapter 4. 'Give' and semantic maps -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Testing the notion of 'semantic distance' on 'give' -- 3. Zeugma and intermediate uses of 'give' -- 4. Gradience of acceptability of a paraphrase -- 5. Analogy and semantic map of 'give' uses -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5. How Europeans GIVE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The category GIVE and linguistic strategies of expressing it -- 3. Data and methods -- 4. Quantitative analyses -- 5. Summary and outlook -- References -- Chapter 6. Ditransitive constructions in Gan Chinese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. GIVE in Mandarin and Gan Chinese: A contrastive look -- 3. Emergence of inverted DOC -- 4. Valency increasing and preposition incorporation -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References.

Chapter 7. The argument realisation of give and take verbs in Māori -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Give verbs in Māori -- 3. Take verbs in Māori -- 4. Give, take and Māori case-system -- 5. Conclusion -- List of abbreviations -- References -- Chapter 8. GIVE and its arguments in Bohairic Coptic -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Differential Goal Marking: n-/na= vs. e-/ero= as markers of the third argument -- 3. Variations on a Theme -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Chapter 9. Giving is receiving -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background on Shaowu -- 3. Origin and polysemy of the lexical morpheme [tie53] -- 4. From GET to GIVE -- 5. Concluding remarks -- Abbreviations -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 10. Enabling and allowing in Hebrew -- 1. Introduction: Hebrew Three Argument Dative constructions -- 2. Usage-Based Construction Grammar -- 3. Data and method -- 4. Results and discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11. Low-level patterning of pronominal subjects and verb tenses in English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Corpora used in this study -- 3. Methodology -- 4. Low-level patterning with GIVE-type verbs -- 5. Subjectivity in give-type verbs -- 6. Concluding remarks -- Abbreviations -- References -- Appendix -- Chapter 12. The morphological, syntactic and semantic interface of the verb GIVE in Lithuanian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Framework, data and methodology -- 3. The meaning of the verb GIVE in Lithuanian -- 4. Morpho-syntactic characteristics of Lithuanian verb GIVE -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Chapter 13. Rise and fall of the take-future in written Estonian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Etymology, basic meaning and grammaticalization of the verb võtma 'take' and the construction V(q -- 3. Vernacular origin of the construction võtma + Vinf1 -- 4. Old Written Estonian.

5. Corpus study of the construction võtma + Vinf1 -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- Data sources -- References -- Chapter 14. Causation in the Australian dialects Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara -- 1. Australian languages -- 2. Causation seen through Role and Reference Grammar -- 3. Pitjantjatjara/Yankunytjatjara verbs and nominals -- 4. Causation: Definitions and description of the phenomena -- 5. Multiple verb constructions -- 6. The three causative types of compact/and/purp -- 7. Concluding discussion -- Abbreviations -- Pronouns -- References -- Chapter 15. The fare causative derivation in Italian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Problematic claims from the literature -- 3. The Italian fare derivation in the wider typological context -- 4. Derivation schemas for Italian fare-causatives -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 16. Information-structural encoding of recipient in non-canonical alignments of Persian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Persian monotransitive alignments -- 3. The ditransitive alignment with OBJ in Persian -- 4. Non-canonical ditransitives: A constructional account -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References -- Index.

This chapter aims to study the prepositional marking and the postpositional marking of the recipient in the Persian non-canonical ditransitive alignments, which are associated respectively with a particular role that the recipient as topic or exhaustive focus plays in the information-structural representation of the benefactive event. I will argue that overriding of the theme and recipient by each other with respect to topicality, grammatically achieved by utilizing two distinct operations including preposing and left-dislocation, determines the intended grammatical marking of the recipient. Moreover, the pragmatic alternation between the two types of coding portrays a constructional pattern which will be accounted for in terms of a Role and Reference Grammar (RRG) framework.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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