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Introduction to Population Ecology.

By: Publisher: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (380 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781118947562
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Introduction to Population EcologyDDC classification:
  • 577.8/8
LOC classification:
  • QH352 -- .R63 2015eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- About the companion website -- Part 1 Single species populations -- Chapter 1 Density independent growth -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Fundamentals of population growth -- 1.3 Types of models -- 1.4 Density independent versus density dependent growth -- 1.5 Discrete or "geometric" growth in populations with non-overlapping generations -- 1.6 Exponential growth in populations with overlapping generations -- 1.7 Examples of exponential growth -- 1.8 Applications to human populations -- 1.9 The finite rate of increase (λ ) and the intrinsic rate of increase (r) -- 1.10 Stochastic models of population growth and population viability analysis -- 1.11 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2 Density dependent growth and intraspecific competition -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Density dependence in populations with discrete generations -- 2.3 Density dependence in populations with overlapping generations -- 2.4 Nonlinear density dependence of birth and death rates and the Allee effect -- 2.5 Time lags and limit cycles -- 2.6 Chaos and behavior of the discrete logistic model -- 2.7 Adding stochasticity to density dependent models -- 2.8 Laboratory and field data -- 2.9 Behavioral aspects of intraspecific competition -- 2.10 Summary -- References -- Chapter 3 Population regulation -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 What is population regulation? -- 3.3 Combining density-dependent and density-independent factors -- 3.4 Tests of density dependence -- 3.5 Summary -- References -- Chapter 4 Populations with age structures -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Survivorship -- 4.3 Fertility -- 4.4 Mortality curves -- 4.5 Expectation of life -- 4.6 Net reproductive rate, generation time, and the intrinsic rate of increase -- 4.7 Age structure and the stable age distribution.
4.8 Projecting population growth in age-structured populations -- 4.9 The Leslie or population projection matrix -- 4.10 A second version of the Leslie matrix -- 4.11 The Lefkovitch modification of the Leslie matrix -- 4.12 Dominant latent roots and the characteristic equation -- 4.13 Reproductive value -- 4.14 Conclusions: sensitivity analysis -- References -- Chapter 5 Metapopulation ecology -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Metapopulations and spatial ecology -- 5.3 MacArthur and Wilson and the equilibrium theory -- 5.4 The Levins or classical metapopulation -- 5.5 Lande's extension of the Levins model -- 5.6 Extinction in metapopulations -- 5.7 Metapopulation dynamics of two local populations -- 5.8 Source-sink metapopulations and the rescue effect -- 5.9 Nonequilibrium and patchy metapopulations -- 5.10 Spatially realistic models -- 5.11 Assumptions and evidence for the existence of metapopulations in nature -- 5.12 Summary -- References -- Chapter 6 Life history strategies -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Power laws -- 6.3 The metabolic theory of ecology -- 6.4 Cole and Lewontin -- 6.5 The theory of r- and K-selection versus fast and slow life histories -- 6.6 Cost of reproduction and allocation of energy -- 6.7 Clutch size -- 6.8 Latitudinal gradients in clutch size -- 6.9 The effects of predation and disease on life history characteristics -- 6.10 Bet-hedging -- 6.11 The Grime general model for three evolutionary strategies in plants -- 6.12 Summary -- References -- Part 2 Interspecific interactions among populations -- Types of interactions -- Predator-prey, parasite-host, and plant-herbivore interactions -- Terminology -- Chapter 7 Interspecific competition -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Interspecific competition: early experiments and the competitive exclusion principle -- 7.3 The Lotka-Volterra competition equations.
7.4 Laboratory experiments and competition -- 7.5 Resource-based competition theory -- 7.6 Spatial competition and the competition-colonization trade-off -- 7.7 Evidence for competition from nature -- 7.8 Indirect evidence for competition and "natural experiments" -- 7.9 Summary -- References -- Chapter 8 Mutualism -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Ant-plant mutualisms -- 8.3 Modeling mutualism -- 8.4 Summary: the costs of mutualism -- References -- Chapter 9 Host-parasite interactions -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Factors affecting microparasite population biology -- 9.3 Modeling host-microparasite interactions -- 9.4 Dynamics of the disease -- 9.5 Immunization -- 9.6 Endangered metapopulations and disease -- 9.7 Social parasites -- 9.8 Summary -- References -- Chapter 10 Predator/prey interactions -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Lotka-Volterra equations -- 10.3 Early tests of the Lotka-Volterra models -- 10.4 Functional responses -- 10.5 Adding prey density dependence and the type II and III functional responses to the Lotka-Volterra equations -- 10.6 The graphical analyses of Rosenzweig and MacArthur -- 10.7 Use of a half saturation constant in predator/prey interactions -- 10.8 Parasitoid/host interactions and the Nicholson-Bailey models -- 10.9 Section summary -- 10.10 Field studies -- 10.11 The dangers of a predatory lifestyle -- 10.12 Escape from predation -- 10.13 Summary -- References -- Chapter 11 Plant-herbivore interactions -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Classes of chemical defenses -- 11.3 Constitutive versus Induced Defense -- 11.4 Plant communication -- 11.5 Novel defenses/herbivore responses -- 11.6 Detoxification of plant compounds by herbivores -- 11.7 Plant apparency and chemical defense -- 11.8 Soil fertility and chemical defense -- 11.9 Modeling plant-herbivore population dynamics.
11.10 Summary: the complexities of herbivore-plant interactions -- References -- Chapter 12 Multi-trophic interactions -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Trophic cascades -- 12.3 Trophic cascades and antropogenic change -- 12.4 Intraguild predation -- 12.5 Intraguild predation and prey suppression -- 12.6 Intraguild predation and mesopredator release -- 12.7 Cannibalism -- References -- Appendix 1: Problem sets -- Appendix 2: Matrix algebra: the basics -- A2.1 Matrix operations -- A2.2 The laws of algebra -- Appendix 3: List of mathematical symbols used in this book -- A3.1 Chapter 1 -- A3.2 Chapter 2 -- A3.3 Chapter 3 -- A3.4 Chapter 4 -- A3.5 Chapter 5 -- A3.6 Chapter 6 -- A3.7 Chapter 7 -- A3.8 Chapter 8 -- A3.9 Chapter 9 -- A3.10 Chapter 10 -- A3.11 Chapter 11 -- A3.12 Chapter 12 -- Index -- EULA.
Summary: Introduction to Population Ecology, 2nd Edition is a comprehensive textbook covering all aspects of population ecology.  It uses a wide variety of field and laboratory examples, botanical to zoological, from the tropics to the tundra, to illustrate the fundamental laws of population ecology. Controversies in population ecology are brought fully up to date in this edition, with many brand new and revised examples and data. Each chapter provides an overview of how population theory has developed, followed by descriptions of laboratory and field studies that have been inspired by the theory. Topics explored include single-species population growth and self-limitation, life histories, metapopulations and a wide range of interspecific interactions including competition, mutualism, parasite-host, predator-prey and plant-herbivore. An additional final chapter, new for the second edition, considers multi-trophic and other complex interactions among species.  Throughout the book, the mathematics involved is explained with a step-by-step approach, and graphs and other visual aids are used to present a clear illustration of how the models work. Such features make this an accessible introduction to population ecology; essential reading for undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in population ecology, applied ecology, conservation ecology, and conservation biology, including those with little mathematical experience.
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Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
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Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP-N0001574
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Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- About the companion website -- Part 1 Single species populations -- Chapter 1 Density independent growth -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Fundamentals of population growth -- 1.3 Types of models -- 1.4 Density independent versus density dependent growth -- 1.5 Discrete or "geometric" growth in populations with non-overlapping generations -- 1.6 Exponential growth in populations with overlapping generations -- 1.7 Examples of exponential growth -- 1.8 Applications to human populations -- 1.9 The finite rate of increase (λ ) and the intrinsic rate of increase (r) -- 1.10 Stochastic models of population growth and population viability analysis -- 1.11 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 2 Density dependent growth and intraspecific competition -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Density dependence in populations with discrete generations -- 2.3 Density dependence in populations with overlapping generations -- 2.4 Nonlinear density dependence of birth and death rates and the Allee effect -- 2.5 Time lags and limit cycles -- 2.6 Chaos and behavior of the discrete logistic model -- 2.7 Adding stochasticity to density dependent models -- 2.8 Laboratory and field data -- 2.9 Behavioral aspects of intraspecific competition -- 2.10 Summary -- References -- Chapter 3 Population regulation -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 What is population regulation? -- 3.3 Combining density-dependent and density-independent factors -- 3.4 Tests of density dependence -- 3.5 Summary -- References -- Chapter 4 Populations with age structures -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Survivorship -- 4.3 Fertility -- 4.4 Mortality curves -- 4.5 Expectation of life -- 4.6 Net reproductive rate, generation time, and the intrinsic rate of increase -- 4.7 Age structure and the stable age distribution.

4.8 Projecting population growth in age-structured populations -- 4.9 The Leslie or population projection matrix -- 4.10 A second version of the Leslie matrix -- 4.11 The Lefkovitch modification of the Leslie matrix -- 4.12 Dominant latent roots and the characteristic equation -- 4.13 Reproductive value -- 4.14 Conclusions: sensitivity analysis -- References -- Chapter 5 Metapopulation ecology -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Metapopulations and spatial ecology -- 5.3 MacArthur and Wilson and the equilibrium theory -- 5.4 The Levins or classical metapopulation -- 5.5 Lande's extension of the Levins model -- 5.6 Extinction in metapopulations -- 5.7 Metapopulation dynamics of two local populations -- 5.8 Source-sink metapopulations and the rescue effect -- 5.9 Nonequilibrium and patchy metapopulations -- 5.10 Spatially realistic models -- 5.11 Assumptions and evidence for the existence of metapopulations in nature -- 5.12 Summary -- References -- Chapter 6 Life history strategies -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Power laws -- 6.3 The metabolic theory of ecology -- 6.4 Cole and Lewontin -- 6.5 The theory of r- and K-selection versus fast and slow life histories -- 6.6 Cost of reproduction and allocation of energy -- 6.7 Clutch size -- 6.8 Latitudinal gradients in clutch size -- 6.9 The effects of predation and disease on life history characteristics -- 6.10 Bet-hedging -- 6.11 The Grime general model for three evolutionary strategies in plants -- 6.12 Summary -- References -- Part 2 Interspecific interactions among populations -- Types of interactions -- Predator-prey, parasite-host, and plant-herbivore interactions -- Terminology -- Chapter 7 Interspecific competition -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Interspecific competition: early experiments and the competitive exclusion principle -- 7.3 The Lotka-Volterra competition equations.

7.4 Laboratory experiments and competition -- 7.5 Resource-based competition theory -- 7.6 Spatial competition and the competition-colonization trade-off -- 7.7 Evidence for competition from nature -- 7.8 Indirect evidence for competition and "natural experiments" -- 7.9 Summary -- References -- Chapter 8 Mutualism -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Ant-plant mutualisms -- 8.3 Modeling mutualism -- 8.4 Summary: the costs of mutualism -- References -- Chapter 9 Host-parasite interactions -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Factors affecting microparasite population biology -- 9.3 Modeling host-microparasite interactions -- 9.4 Dynamics of the disease -- 9.5 Immunization -- 9.6 Endangered metapopulations and disease -- 9.7 Social parasites -- 9.8 Summary -- References -- Chapter 10 Predator/prey interactions -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Lotka-Volterra equations -- 10.3 Early tests of the Lotka-Volterra models -- 10.4 Functional responses -- 10.5 Adding prey density dependence and the type II and III functional responses to the Lotka-Volterra equations -- 10.6 The graphical analyses of Rosenzweig and MacArthur -- 10.7 Use of a half saturation constant in predator/prey interactions -- 10.8 Parasitoid/host interactions and the Nicholson-Bailey models -- 10.9 Section summary -- 10.10 Field studies -- 10.11 The dangers of a predatory lifestyle -- 10.12 Escape from predation -- 10.13 Summary -- References -- Chapter 11 Plant-herbivore interactions -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Classes of chemical defenses -- 11.3 Constitutive versus Induced Defense -- 11.4 Plant communication -- 11.5 Novel defenses/herbivore responses -- 11.6 Detoxification of plant compounds by herbivores -- 11.7 Plant apparency and chemical defense -- 11.8 Soil fertility and chemical defense -- 11.9 Modeling plant-herbivore population dynamics.

11.10 Summary: the complexities of herbivore-plant interactions -- References -- Chapter 12 Multi-trophic interactions -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Trophic cascades -- 12.3 Trophic cascades and antropogenic change -- 12.4 Intraguild predation -- 12.5 Intraguild predation and prey suppression -- 12.6 Intraguild predation and mesopredator release -- 12.7 Cannibalism -- References -- Appendix 1: Problem sets -- Appendix 2: Matrix algebra: the basics -- A2.1 Matrix operations -- A2.2 The laws of algebra -- Appendix 3: List of mathematical symbols used in this book -- A3.1 Chapter 1 -- A3.2 Chapter 2 -- A3.3 Chapter 3 -- A3.4 Chapter 4 -- A3.5 Chapter 5 -- A3.6 Chapter 6 -- A3.7 Chapter 7 -- A3.8 Chapter 8 -- A3.9 Chapter 9 -- A3.10 Chapter 10 -- A3.11 Chapter 11 -- A3.12 Chapter 12 -- Index -- EULA.

Introduction to Population Ecology, 2nd Edition is a comprehensive textbook covering all aspects of population ecology.  It uses a wide variety of field and laboratory examples, botanical to zoological, from the tropics to the tundra, to illustrate the fundamental laws of population ecology. Controversies in population ecology are brought fully up to date in this edition, with many brand new and revised examples and data. Each chapter provides an overview of how population theory has developed, followed by descriptions of laboratory and field studies that have been inspired by the theory. Topics explored include single-species population growth and self-limitation, life histories, metapopulations and a wide range of interspecific interactions including competition, mutualism, parasite-host, predator-prey and plant-herbivore. An additional final chapter, new for the second edition, considers multi-trophic and other complex interactions among species.  Throughout the book, the mathematics involved is explained with a step-by-step approach, and graphs and other visual aids are used to present a clear illustration of how the models work. Such features make this an accessible introduction to population ecology; essential reading for undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in population ecology, applied ecology, conservation ecology, and conservation biology, including those with little mathematical experience.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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