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Introduction to Computational Contact Mechanics : A Geometrical Approach.

By: Contributor(s): Series: Wiley Series in Computational Mechanics SerPublisher: New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2014Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (305 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781118770634
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Introduction to Computational Contact Mechanics : A Geometrical ApproachDDC classification:
  • 620.1/05
LOC classification:
  • TA353 -- .K669 2015eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Series Preface -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Part I Theory -- Chapter 1 Introduction with a Spring-Mass Frictionless Contact System -- 1.1 Structural Part-Deflection of Spring-Mass System -- 1.2 Contact Part-Non-Penetration into Rigid Plane -- 1.3 Contact Formulations -- 1.3.1 Lagrange Multiplier Method -- 1.3.2 Penalty Method -- 1.3.3 Augmented Lagrangian Method -- Chapter 2 General Formulation of a Contact Problem -- 2.1 Structural Part-Formulation of a Problem in Linear Elasticity -- 2.1.1 Strong Formulation of Equilibrium -- 2.1.2 Weak Formulation of Equilibrium -- 2.2 Formulation of the Contact Part (Signorini's problem) -- Chapter 3 Differential Geometry -- 3.1 Curve and its Properties -- 3.1.1 Example: Circle and its Properties -- 3.2 Frenet Formulas in 2D -- 3.3 Description of Surfaces by Gauss Coordinates -- 3.3.1 Tangent and Normal Vectors: Surface Coordinate System -- 3.3.2 Basis Vectors: Metric Tensor and its Applications -- 3.3.3 Relationships between Co- and Contravariant Basis Vectors -- 3.3.4 Co- and Contravariant Representation of a Vector on a Surface -- 3.3.5 Curvature Tensor and Structure of the Surface -- 3.4 Differential Properties of Surfaces -- 3.4.1 The Weingarten Formula -- 3.4.2 The Gauss-Codazzi Formula -- 3.4.3 Covariant Derivatives on the Surface -- 3.4.4 Example: Geometrical Analysis of a Cylindrical Surface -- Chapter 4 Geometry and Kinematics for an Arbitrary Two Body Contact Problem -- 4.1 Local Coordinate System -- 4.2 Closest Point Projection (CPP) Procedure-Analysis -- 4.2.1 Existence and Uniqueness of CPP Procedure -- 4.2.2 Numerical Solution of CPP Procedure in 2D -- 4.2.3 Numerical Solution of CPP Procedure in 3D -- 4.3 Contact Kinematics -- 4.3.1 2D Contact Kinematics using Natural Coordinates s and ζ -- 4.3.2 Contact Kinematics in 3D Coordinate System.
Chapter 5 Abstract Form of Formulations in Computational Mechanics -- 5.1 Operator Necessary for the Abstract Formulation -- 5.1.1 Examples of Operators in Mechanics -- 5.1.2 Examples of Various Problems -- 5.2 Abstract Form of the Iterative Method -- 5.3 Fixed Point Theorem (Banach) -- 5.4 Newton Iterative Solution Method -- 5.4.1 Geometrical Interpretation of the Newton Iterative Method -- 5.5 Abstract Form for Contact Formulations -- 5.5.1 Lagrange Multiplier Method in Operator Form -- 5.5.2 Penalty Method in Operator Form -- Chapter 6 Weak Formulation and Consistent Linearization -- 6.1 Weak Formulation in the Local Coordinate System -- 6.2 Regularization with Penalty Method -- 6.3 Consistent Linearization -- 6.3.1 Linearization of Normal Part -- 6.4 Application to Lagrange Multipliers and to Following Forces -- 6.4.1 Linearization for the Lagrange Multipliers Method -- 6.4.2 Linearization for Following Forces: Normal Force or Pressure -- 6.5 Linearization of the Convective Variation δξ -- 6.6 Nitsche Method -- 6.6.1 Example: Independence of the Stabilization Parameter -- Chapter 7 Finite Element Discretization -- 7.1 Computation of the Contact Integral for Various Contact Approaches -- 7.1.1 Numerical Integration for the Node-To-Node (NTN) -- 7.1.2 Numerical Integration for the Node-To-Segment (NTS) -- 7.1.3 Numerical Integration for the Segment-To-Analytical Segment (STAS) -- 7.1.4 Numerical Integration for the Segment-To-Segment (STS) -- 7.2 Node-To-Node (NTN) Contact Element -- 7.3 Nitsche Node-To-Node (NTN) Contact Element -- 7.4 Node-To-Segment (NTS) Contact Element -- 7.4.1 Closest Point Projection Procedure for the Linear NTS Contact Element -- 7.4.2 Peculiarities in Computation of the Contact Integral -- 7.4.3 Residual and Tangent Matrix -- 7.5 Segment-To-Analytical-Surface (STAS) Approach.
7.5.1 General Structure of CPP Procedure for STAS Contact Element -- 7.5.2 Closed form Solutions for Penetration in 2D -- 7.5.3 Discretization for STAS Contact Approach -- 7.5.4 Residual and Tangent Matrix -- 7.6 Segment-To-Segment (STS) Mortar Approach -- 7.6.1 Peculiarities of the CPP Procedure for the STS Contact Approach -- 7.6.2 Computation of the Residual and Tangent Matrix -- Chapter 8 Verification with Analytical Solutions -- 8.1 Hertz Problem -- 8.1.1 Contact Geometry -- 8.1.2 Contact Pressure and Displacement for Spheres: 3D Hertz Solution -- 8.1.3 Contact Pressure and Displacement for Cylinders: 2D Hertz Solution -- 8.2 Rigid Flat Punch Problem -- 8.3 Impact on Moving Pendulum: Center of Percussion -- 8.4 Generalized Euler-Eytelwein Problem -- 8.4.1 A Rope on a Circle and a Rope on an Ellipse -- Chapter 9 Frictional Contact Problems -- 9.1 Measures of Contact Interactions-Sticking and Sliding Case: Friction Law -- 9.1.1 Coulomb Friction Law -- 9.2 Regularization of Tangential Force and Return Mapping Algorithm -- 9.2.1 Elasto-Plastic Analogy: Principle of Maximum of Dissipation -- 9.2.2 Update of Sliding Displacements in the Case of Reversible Loading -- 9.3 Weak Form and its Consistent Linearization -- 9.4 Frictional Node-To-Node (NTN) Contact Element -- 9.4.1 Regularization of the Contact Conditions -- 9.4.2 Linearization the of Tangential Part for the NTN Contact Approach -- 9.4.3 Discretization of Frictional NTN -- 9.4.4 Algorithm for a Local Level Frictional NTN Contact Element -- 9.5 Frictional Node-To-Segment (NTS) Contact Element -- 9.5.1 Linearization and Discretization for the NTS Frictional Contact Element -- 9.5.2 Algorithm for a Local Level NTS Frictional Contact Element -- 9.6 NTS Frictional Contact Element -- Part II Programming and Verification Tasks -- Chapter 10 Introduction to Programming and Verification Tasks.
Chapter 11 Lesson 1 Nonlinear Structural Truss-elmt1.f -- 11.1 Implementation -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 11.2 Examples -- 11.2.1 Constitutive Laws of Material -- 11.2.2 Large Rotation -- 11.2.3 Snap-Through Buckling -- Chapter 12 Lesson 2 Nonlinear Structural Plane-elmt2.f -- 12.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Setup of mass matrix (isw = 5) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 12.2 Examples -- 12.2.1 Constitutive Law of Material -- 12.2.2 Large Rotation -- Chapter 13 Lesson 3 Penalty Node-To-Node (NTN)-elmt100.f -- 13.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 13.2 Examples -- 13.2.1 Two Trusses -- 13.2.2 Three Trusses -- 13.2.3 Two Blocks -- Chapter 14 Lesson 4 Lagrange Multiplier Node-To-Node (NTN)-elmt101.f -- 14.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 14.2 Examples -- 14.2.1 Two Trusses -- 14.2.2 Three Trusses -- Chapter 15 Lesson 5 Nitsche Node-To-Node (NTN)-elmt102.f -- 15.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 15.2 Examples -- 15.2.1 Two Trusses -- 15.2.2 Three Trusses -- Chapter 16 Lesson 6 Node-To-Segment (NTS)-elmt103.f -- 16.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 16.2 Examples -- 16.2.1 Two Blocks -- 16.2.2 Two Blocks-Horizontal Position -- 16.2.3 Two Cantilever Beams-Large Sliding Test -- 16.2.4 Hertz Problem -- 16.3 Inverted Contact Algorithm-Following Force.
Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- 16.3.1 Verification of the Rotational Part-A Single Following Force -- Chapter 17 Lesson 7 Segment-To-Analytical-Segment (STAS)-elmt104.f -- 17.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 17.2 Examples -- 17.2.1 Block and Rigid Surface -- 17.2.2 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface -- 17.2.3 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface-different Boundary Condition -- 17.2.4 Bending Over a Rigid Cylinder -- 17.3 Inverted Contact Algorithm-General Case of Following Forces -- Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- 17.3.1 Verification of a Rotational Part-A Single Following Force -- 17.3.2 Distributed Following Forces-Pressure -- 17.3.3 Inflating of a Bar -- Chapter 18 Lesson 8 Mortar/Segment-To-Segment (STS)-elmt105.f -- 18.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 18.2 Examples -- 18.2.1 Two Blocks -- 18.2.2 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface-Different Boundary Condition -- 18.2.3 Contact Patch Test -- 18.3 Inverted Contact Algorithm-Following Force -- Implementation -- 18.3.1 Verification of the Rotational Part-Pressure on the Master Side -- Chapter 19 Lesson 9 Higher Order Mortar/STS-elmt106.f -- 19.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 19.2 Examples -- 19.2.1 Two Blocks -- 19.2.2 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface-Different Boundary Condition -- Chapter 20 Lesson 10 3D Node-To-Segment (NTS)-elmt107.f -- 20.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3).
Description of subroutines.
Summary: Introduction to Computational Contact Mechanics: A Geometrical Approach covers the fundamentals of computational contact mechanics and focuses on its practical implementation. Part one of this textbook focuses on the underlying theory and covers essential information about differential geometry and mathematical methods which are necessary to build the computational algorithm independently from other courses in mechanics. The geometrically exact theory for the computational contact mechanics is described in step-by-step manner, using examples of strict derivation from a mathematical point of view. The final goal of the theory is to construct in the independent approximation form /so-called covariant form, including application to high-order and isogeometric finite elements. The second part of a book is a practical guide for programming of contact elements and is written in such a way that makes it easy for a programmer to implement using any programming language. All programming examples are accompanied by a set of verification examples allowing the user to learn the research verification technique, essential for the computational contact analysis. Key features: Covers the fundamentals of computational contact mechanics Covers practical programming, verification and analysis of contact problems Presents the geometrically exact theory for computational contact mechanics Describes algorithms used in well-known finite element software packages Describes modeling of forces as an inverse contact algorithm Includes practical exercises Contains unique verification examples such as the generalized Euler formula for a rope on a surface, and the impact problem and verification of thå percussion center Accompanied by a website hosting software Introduction to Computational Contact Mechanics: A Geometrical Approach is an ideal textbook for graduates andSummary: senior undergraduates, and is also a useful reference for researchers and practitioners working in computational mechanics..
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Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Series Preface -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Part I Theory -- Chapter 1 Introduction with a Spring-Mass Frictionless Contact System -- 1.1 Structural Part-Deflection of Spring-Mass System -- 1.2 Contact Part-Non-Penetration into Rigid Plane -- 1.3 Contact Formulations -- 1.3.1 Lagrange Multiplier Method -- 1.3.2 Penalty Method -- 1.3.3 Augmented Lagrangian Method -- Chapter 2 General Formulation of a Contact Problem -- 2.1 Structural Part-Formulation of a Problem in Linear Elasticity -- 2.1.1 Strong Formulation of Equilibrium -- 2.1.2 Weak Formulation of Equilibrium -- 2.2 Formulation of the Contact Part (Signorini's problem) -- Chapter 3 Differential Geometry -- 3.1 Curve and its Properties -- 3.1.1 Example: Circle and its Properties -- 3.2 Frenet Formulas in 2D -- 3.3 Description of Surfaces by Gauss Coordinates -- 3.3.1 Tangent and Normal Vectors: Surface Coordinate System -- 3.3.2 Basis Vectors: Metric Tensor and its Applications -- 3.3.3 Relationships between Co- and Contravariant Basis Vectors -- 3.3.4 Co- and Contravariant Representation of a Vector on a Surface -- 3.3.5 Curvature Tensor and Structure of the Surface -- 3.4 Differential Properties of Surfaces -- 3.4.1 The Weingarten Formula -- 3.4.2 The Gauss-Codazzi Formula -- 3.4.3 Covariant Derivatives on the Surface -- 3.4.4 Example: Geometrical Analysis of a Cylindrical Surface -- Chapter 4 Geometry and Kinematics for an Arbitrary Two Body Contact Problem -- 4.1 Local Coordinate System -- 4.2 Closest Point Projection (CPP) Procedure-Analysis -- 4.2.1 Existence and Uniqueness of CPP Procedure -- 4.2.2 Numerical Solution of CPP Procedure in 2D -- 4.2.3 Numerical Solution of CPP Procedure in 3D -- 4.3 Contact Kinematics -- 4.3.1 2D Contact Kinematics using Natural Coordinates s and ζ -- 4.3.2 Contact Kinematics in 3D Coordinate System.

Chapter 5 Abstract Form of Formulations in Computational Mechanics -- 5.1 Operator Necessary for the Abstract Formulation -- 5.1.1 Examples of Operators in Mechanics -- 5.1.2 Examples of Various Problems -- 5.2 Abstract Form of the Iterative Method -- 5.3 Fixed Point Theorem (Banach) -- 5.4 Newton Iterative Solution Method -- 5.4.1 Geometrical Interpretation of the Newton Iterative Method -- 5.5 Abstract Form for Contact Formulations -- 5.5.1 Lagrange Multiplier Method in Operator Form -- 5.5.2 Penalty Method in Operator Form -- Chapter 6 Weak Formulation and Consistent Linearization -- 6.1 Weak Formulation in the Local Coordinate System -- 6.2 Regularization with Penalty Method -- 6.3 Consistent Linearization -- 6.3.1 Linearization of Normal Part -- 6.4 Application to Lagrange Multipliers and to Following Forces -- 6.4.1 Linearization for the Lagrange Multipliers Method -- 6.4.2 Linearization for Following Forces: Normal Force or Pressure -- 6.5 Linearization of the Convective Variation δξ -- 6.6 Nitsche Method -- 6.6.1 Example: Independence of the Stabilization Parameter -- Chapter 7 Finite Element Discretization -- 7.1 Computation of the Contact Integral for Various Contact Approaches -- 7.1.1 Numerical Integration for the Node-To-Node (NTN) -- 7.1.2 Numerical Integration for the Node-To-Segment (NTS) -- 7.1.3 Numerical Integration for the Segment-To-Analytical Segment (STAS) -- 7.1.4 Numerical Integration for the Segment-To-Segment (STS) -- 7.2 Node-To-Node (NTN) Contact Element -- 7.3 Nitsche Node-To-Node (NTN) Contact Element -- 7.4 Node-To-Segment (NTS) Contact Element -- 7.4.1 Closest Point Projection Procedure for the Linear NTS Contact Element -- 7.4.2 Peculiarities in Computation of the Contact Integral -- 7.4.3 Residual and Tangent Matrix -- 7.5 Segment-To-Analytical-Surface (STAS) Approach.

7.5.1 General Structure of CPP Procedure for STAS Contact Element -- 7.5.2 Closed form Solutions for Penetration in 2D -- 7.5.3 Discretization for STAS Contact Approach -- 7.5.4 Residual and Tangent Matrix -- 7.6 Segment-To-Segment (STS) Mortar Approach -- 7.6.1 Peculiarities of the CPP Procedure for the STS Contact Approach -- 7.6.2 Computation of the Residual and Tangent Matrix -- Chapter 8 Verification with Analytical Solutions -- 8.1 Hertz Problem -- 8.1.1 Contact Geometry -- 8.1.2 Contact Pressure and Displacement for Spheres: 3D Hertz Solution -- 8.1.3 Contact Pressure and Displacement for Cylinders: 2D Hertz Solution -- 8.2 Rigid Flat Punch Problem -- 8.3 Impact on Moving Pendulum: Center of Percussion -- 8.4 Generalized Euler-Eytelwein Problem -- 8.4.1 A Rope on a Circle and a Rope on an Ellipse -- Chapter 9 Frictional Contact Problems -- 9.1 Measures of Contact Interactions-Sticking and Sliding Case: Friction Law -- 9.1.1 Coulomb Friction Law -- 9.2 Regularization of Tangential Force and Return Mapping Algorithm -- 9.2.1 Elasto-Plastic Analogy: Principle of Maximum of Dissipation -- 9.2.2 Update of Sliding Displacements in the Case of Reversible Loading -- 9.3 Weak Form and its Consistent Linearization -- 9.4 Frictional Node-To-Node (NTN) Contact Element -- 9.4.1 Regularization of the Contact Conditions -- 9.4.2 Linearization the of Tangential Part for the NTN Contact Approach -- 9.4.3 Discretization of Frictional NTN -- 9.4.4 Algorithm for a Local Level Frictional NTN Contact Element -- 9.5 Frictional Node-To-Segment (NTS) Contact Element -- 9.5.1 Linearization and Discretization for the NTS Frictional Contact Element -- 9.5.2 Algorithm for a Local Level NTS Frictional Contact Element -- 9.6 NTS Frictional Contact Element -- Part II Programming and Verification Tasks -- Chapter 10 Introduction to Programming and Verification Tasks.

Chapter 11 Lesson 1 Nonlinear Structural Truss-elmt1.f -- 11.1 Implementation -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 11.2 Examples -- 11.2.1 Constitutive Laws of Material -- 11.2.2 Large Rotation -- 11.2.3 Snap-Through Buckling -- Chapter 12 Lesson 2 Nonlinear Structural Plane-elmt2.f -- 12.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Setup of mass matrix (isw = 5) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 12.2 Examples -- 12.2.1 Constitutive Law of Material -- 12.2.2 Large Rotation -- Chapter 13 Lesson 3 Penalty Node-To-Node (NTN)-elmt100.f -- 13.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 13.2 Examples -- 13.2.1 Two Trusses -- 13.2.2 Three Trusses -- 13.2.3 Two Blocks -- Chapter 14 Lesson 4 Lagrange Multiplier Node-To-Node (NTN)-elmt101.f -- 14.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 14.2 Examples -- 14.2.1 Two Trusses -- 14.2.2 Three Trusses -- Chapter 15 Lesson 5 Nitsche Node-To-Node (NTN)-elmt102.f -- 15.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 15.2 Examples -- 15.2.1 Two Trusses -- 15.2.2 Three Trusses -- Chapter 16 Lesson 6 Node-To-Segment (NTS)-elmt103.f -- 16.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 16.2 Examples -- 16.2.1 Two Blocks -- 16.2.2 Two Blocks-Horizontal Position -- 16.2.3 Two Cantilever Beams-Large Sliding Test -- 16.2.4 Hertz Problem -- 16.3 Inverted Contact Algorithm-Following Force.

Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- 16.3.1 Verification of the Rotational Part-A Single Following Force -- Chapter 17 Lesson 7 Segment-To-Analytical-Segment (STAS)-elmt104.f -- 17.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 17.2 Examples -- 17.2.1 Block and Rigid Surface -- 17.2.2 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface -- 17.2.3 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface-different Boundary Condition -- 17.2.4 Bending Over a Rigid Cylinder -- 17.3 Inverted Contact Algorithm-General Case of Following Forces -- Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- 17.3.1 Verification of a Rotational Part-A Single Following Force -- 17.3.2 Distributed Following Forces-Pressure -- 17.3.3 Inflating of a Bar -- Chapter 18 Lesson 8 Mortar/Segment-To-Segment (STS)-elmt105.f -- 18.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 18.2 Examples -- 18.2.1 Two Blocks -- 18.2.2 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface-Different Boundary Condition -- 18.2.3 Contact Patch Test -- 18.3 Inverted Contact Algorithm-Following Force -- Implementation -- 18.3.1 Verification of the Rotational Part-Pressure on the Master Side -- Chapter 19 Lesson 9 Higher Order Mortar/STS-elmt106.f -- 19.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3) -- Description of subroutines -- Global FEAP-arrays -- Hints for implementation -- 19.2 Examples -- 19.2.1 Two Blocks -- 19.2.2 Block and Inclined Rigid Surface-Different Boundary Condition -- Chapter 20 Lesson 10 3D Node-To-Segment (NTS)-elmt107.f -- 20.1 Implementation -- Setup of tangent matrix and residual (isw = 3).

Description of subroutines.

Introduction to Computational Contact Mechanics: A Geometrical Approach covers the fundamentals of computational contact mechanics and focuses on its practical implementation. Part one of this textbook focuses on the underlying theory and covers essential information about differential geometry and mathematical methods which are necessary to build the computational algorithm independently from other courses in mechanics. The geometrically exact theory for the computational contact mechanics is described in step-by-step manner, using examples of strict derivation from a mathematical point of view. The final goal of the theory is to construct in the independent approximation form /so-called covariant form, including application to high-order and isogeometric finite elements. The second part of a book is a practical guide for programming of contact elements and is written in such a way that makes it easy for a programmer to implement using any programming language. All programming examples are accompanied by a set of verification examples allowing the user to learn the research verification technique, essential for the computational contact analysis. Key features: Covers the fundamentals of computational contact mechanics Covers practical programming, verification and analysis of contact problems Presents the geometrically exact theory for computational contact mechanics Describes algorithms used in well-known finite element software packages Describes modeling of forces as an inverse contact algorithm Includes practical exercises Contains unique verification examples such as the generalized Euler formula for a rope on a surface, and the impact problem and verification of thå percussion center Accompanied by a website hosting software Introduction to Computational Contact Mechanics: A Geometrical Approach is an ideal textbook for graduates and

senior undergraduates, and is also a useful reference for researchers and practitioners working in computational mechanics..

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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