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Structural Concrete : Theory and Design.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 6th edDescription: 1 online resource (1069 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781118768136
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Structural Concrete : Theory and DesignDDC classification:
  • 624.1/8341
LOC classification:
  • TA683.2 -- .H377 2015eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Notation -- Conversion Factors -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Structural Concrete -- 1.2 Historical Background -- 1.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Reinforced Concrete -- 1.4 Codes of Practice -- 1.5 Design Philosophy and Concepts -- 1.6 Units of Measurement -- 1.7 Loads -- 1.8 Safety Provisions -- 1.9 Structural Concrete Elements -- 1.10 Structural Concrete Design -- 1.11 Accuracy of Calculations -- 1.12 Concrete High-Rise Buildings -- References -- Chapter 2 Properties of Reinforced Concrete -- 2.1 Factors Affecting Strength of Concrete -- 2.1.1 Water-Cement Ratio -- 2.1.2 Properties and Proportions of Concrete Constituents -- 2.1.3 Method of Mixing and Curing -- 2.1.4 Age of Concrete -- 2.1.5 Loading Conditions -- 2.1.6 Shape and Dimensions of Tested Specimen -- 2.2 Compressive Strength -- 2.3 Stress-Strain Curves of Concrete -- 2.4 Tensile Strength of Concrete -- 2.5 Flexural Strength (Modulus of Rupture) of Concrete -- 2.6 Shear Strength -- 2.7 Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete -- 2.8 Poisson's Ratio -- 2.9 Shear Modulus -- 2.10 Modular Ratio -- 2.11 Volume Changes of Concrete -- 2.11.1 Shrinkage -- 2.11.2 Expansion Due to Rise in Temperature -- 2.12 Creep -- 2.13 Models for Predicting Shrinkage and Creep of Concrete -- 2.13.1 ACI 209R-92 Model -- 2.13.2 B3 Model -- 2.13.4 CEB 90 Model -- 2.13.5 CEB MC 90-99 Model -- 2.13.6 fib MC 2010 Model -- 2.13.7 The AASHTO Model -- 2.14 Unit Weight of Concrete -- 2.15 Fire Resistance -- 2.16 High-Performance Concrete -- 2.17 Lightweight Concrete -- 2.18 Fibrous Concrete -- 2.19 Steel Reinforcement -- 2.19.1 Types of Steel Reinforcement -- 2.19.2 Grades and Strength -- 2.19.3 Stress-Strain Curves -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 3 Flexural Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beams -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Assumptions.
3.3 Behavior of Simply Supported Reinforced Concrete Beam Loaded to Failure -- 3.4 Types of Flexural Failure and Strain Limits -- 3.4.1 Flexural Failure -- 3.4.2 Strain Limits for Tension and Tension-Controlled Sections -- 3.5 Load Factors -- 3.6 Strength Reduction Factor Φ -- 3.7 Significance of Analysis and Design Expressions -- 3.8 Equivalent Compressive Stress Distribution -- 3.9 Singly Reinforced Rectangular Section in Bending -- 3.9.1 Balanced Section -- 3.9.2 Upper Limit of Steel Percentage -- 3.10 Lower Limit or Minimum Percentage of Steel -- 3.11 Adequacy of Sections -- 3.12 Bundled Bars -- 3.13 Sections in the Transition Region (Φ < 0.9) -- 3.14 Rectangular Sections with Compression Reinforcement -- 3.14.1 When Compression Steel Yields -- 3.14.2 When Compression Steel Does Not Yield -- 3.15 Analysis of T- and I-Sections -- 3.15.1 Description -- 3.15.2 Effective Width -- 3.15.3 T-Sections Behaving as Rectangular Sections -- 3.16 Dimensions of Isolated T-Shaped Sections -- 3.17 Inverted L-Shaped Sections -- 3.18 Sections of Other Shapes -- 3.19 Analysis of Sections Using Tables -- 3.20 Additional Examples -- 3.21 Examples Using SI Units -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 4 Flexural Design of Reinforced Concrete Beams -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Rectangular Sections with Tension Reinforcement Only -- 4.3 Spacing of Reinforcement and Concrete Cover -- 4.3.1 Specifications -- 4.3.2 Minimum Width of Concrete Sections -- 4.3.3 Minimum Overall Depth of Concrete Sections -- 4.4 Rectangular Sections with Compression Reinforcement -- 4.4.1 Assuming One Row of Tension Bars -- 4.4.2 Assuming Two Rows of Tension Bars -- 4.5 Design of T-Sections -- 4.6 Additional Examples -- 4.7 Examples Using SI Units -- Summary -- Problems -- Chapter 5 Shear and Diagonal Tension -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Shear Stresses in Concrete Beams.
5.3 Behavior of Beams without Shear Reinforcement -- 5.4 Moment Effect on Shear Strength -- 5.5 Beams with Shear Reinforcement -- 5.6 ACI Code Shear Design Requirements -- 5.6.1 Critical Section for Nominal Shear Strength Calculation -- 5.6.2 Minimum Area of Shear Reinforcement -- 5.6.3 Maximum Shear Carried by Web Reinforcement Vs -- 5.6.4 Maximum Spacing of Stirrups -- 5.6.5 Yield Strength of Shear Reinforcement -- 5.6.6 Anchorage of Stirrups -- 5.6.7 Stirrups Adjacent to the Support -- 5.6.8 Effective Length of Bent Bars -- 5.7 Design of Vertical Stirrups -- 5.8 Design Summary -- 5.9 Shear Force Due to Live Loads -- 5.10 Shear Stresses in Members of Variable Depth -- 5.11 Examples Using SI Units -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 6 Deflection and Control of Cracking -- 6.1 Deflection of Structural Concrete Members -- 6.2 Instantaneous Deflection -- 6.2.1 Modulus of Elasticity -- 6.2.2 Modular Ratio -- 6.2.3 Cracking Moment -- 6.2.4 Moment of Inertia -- 6.2.5 Properties of Sections -- 6.3 Long-Time Deflection -- 6.4 Allowable Deflection -- 6.5 Deflection Due to Combinations of Loads -- 6.6 Cracks in Flexural Members -- 6.7 ACI Code Requirements -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 7 Development Length of Reinforcing Bars -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Development of Bond Stresses -- 7.2.1 Flexural Bond -- 7.2.2 Tests for Bond Efficiency -- 7.3 Development Length in Tension -- 7.3.1 Development Length, Id -- 7.3.2 ACI Code Factors for Calculating ld for Bars in Tension -- 7.3.3 Simplified Expressions for Id -- 7.4 Development Length in Compression -- 7.5 Summary for Computation of ID in Tension -- 7.6 Critical Sections in Flexural Members -- 7.7 Standard Hooks (ACI Code, Sections 25.3 and 25.4) -- 7.8 Splices of Reinforcement -- 7.8.1 General -- 7.8.2 Lap Splices in Tension, lst -- 7.8.3 Lap Splice in Compression, lsc.
7.8.4 Lap Splice in Columns -- 7.9 Moment-Resistance Diagram (Bar Cutoff Points) -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 8 Design of Deep Beams by the Strut-and-Tie Method -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 B- and D-Regions -- 8.3 Strut-and-Tie Model -- 8.4 ACI Design Procedure to Build a Strut-and-Tie Model -- 8.4.1 Model Requirements -- 8.4.2 Check for Shear Resistance -- 8.4.3 Design Steps According to ACI Section 23.2 -- 8.4.4 Design Requirements According to ACI -- 8.5 Strut-and-Tie Method According to AASHTO LRFD -- 8.6 Deep Members -- 8.6.1 Analysis and Behavior of Deep Beams -- 8.6.2 Design of Deep Beams Using Strut-and-Tie Model -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 9 One-Way Slabs -- 9.1 Types of Slabs -- 9.2 Design of One-Way Solid Slabs -- 9.3 Design Limitations According to ACI Code -- 9.4 Temperature and Shrinkage Reinforcement -- 9.5 Reinforcement Details -- 9.6 Distribution of Loads from One-Way Slabs to Supporting Beams -- 9.7 One-Way Joist Floor System -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 10 Axially Loaded Columns -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Types of Columns -- 10.3 Behavior of Axially Loaded Columns -- 10.4 ACI Code Limitations -- 10.5 Spiral Reinforcement -- 10.6 Design Equations -- 10.7 Axial Tension -- 10.8 Long Columns -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 11 Members in Compression and Bending -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Design Assumptions for Columns -- 11.3 Load-Moment Interaction Diagram -- 11.4 Safety Provisions -- 11.5 Balanced Condition: Rectangular Sections -- 11.6 Column Sections under Eccentric Loading -- 11.7 Strength of Columns for Tension Failure -- 11.8 Strength of Columns for Compression Failure -- 11.8.1 Trial Solution -- 11.8.2 Numerical Analysis Solution -- 11.8.3 Approximate Solution -- 11.9 Interaction Diagram Example -- 11.10 Rectangular Columns with Side Bars.
11.11 Load Capacity of Circular Columns -- 11.11.1 Balanced Condition -- 11.11.2 Strength of Circular Columns for Compression Failure -- 11.11.3 Strength of Circular Columns for Tension Failure -- 11.12 Analysis and Design of Columns Using Charts -- 11.13 Design of Columns under Eccentric Loading -- 11.13.1 Design of Columns for Compression Failure -- 11.13.2 Design of Columns for Tension Failure -- 11.14 Biaxial Bending -- 11.15 Circular Columns with Uniform Reinforcement under Biaxial Bending -- 11.16 Square and Rectangular Columns under Biaxial Bending -- 11.16.1 Bresler Reciprocal Method -- 11.16.2 Bresler Load Contour Method -- 11.17 Parme Load Contour Method -- 11.18 Equation of Failure Surface -- 11.19 SI Example -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 12 Slender Columns -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Effective Column Length (Klu) -- 12.3 Effective Length Factor (K) -- 12.4 Member Stiffness (EI) -- 12.5 Limitation of the Slenderness Ratio (Klu/r) -- 12.5.1 Nonsway Frames -- 12.5.2 Sway Frames -- 12.6 Moment-Magnifier Design Method -- 12.6.1 Introduction -- 12.6.2 Magnified Moments in Nonsway Frames -- 12.6.3 Magnified Moments in Sway Frames -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 13 Footings -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Types of Footings -- 13.3 Distribution of Soil Pressure -- 13.4 Design Considerations -- 13.4.1 Size of Footings -- 13.4.2 One-Way Shear (Beam Shear) (Vu1 ) -- 13.4.3 Two-Way Shear (Punching Shear) (Vu2 ) -- 13.4.4 Flexural Strength and Footing Reinforcement -- 13.4.5 Bearing Capacity of Column at Base -- 13.4.6 Development Length of the Reinforcing Bars -- 13.4.7 Differential Settlement (Balanced Footing Design) -- 13.5 Plain Concrete Footings -- 13.6 Combined Footings -- 13.7 Footings under Eccentric Column Loads -- 13.8 Footings under Biaxial Moment -- 13.9 Slabs on Ground -- 13.10 Footings on Piles.
13.11 SI Equations.
Summary: The most up to date structural concrete text, with the latest ACI revisions Structural Concrete is the bestselling text on concrete structural design and analysis, providing the latest information and clear explanation in an easy to understand style. Newly updated to reflect the latest ACI 318-14 code, this sixth edition emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the subject, and builds the student's body of knowledge by presenting design methods alongside relevant standards and code. Numerous examples and practice problems help readers grasp the real-world application of the industry's best practices, with explanations and insight on the extensive ACI revision. Each chapter features examples using SI units and US-SI conversion factors, and SI unit design tables are included for reference. Exceptional weather-resistance and stability make concrete a preferred construction material for most parts of the world. For civil and structural engineering applications, rebar and steel beams are generally added during casting to provide additional support. Pre-cast concrete is becoming increasingly common, allowing better quality control, the use of special admixtures, and the production of innovative shapes that would be too complex to construct on site. This book provides complete guidance toward all aspects of reinforced concrete design, including the ACI revisions that address these new practices. Review the properties of reinforced concrete, with models for shrink and creep Understand shear, diagonal tension, axial loading, and torsion Learn planning considerations for reinforced beams and strut and tie Design retaining walls, footings, slender columns, stairs, and more The American Concrete Institute updates structural concrete code approximately every three years, and it's critical that students learn the most recent standards and best practices.Summary: Structural Concrete provides the most up to date information, with intuitive explanation and detailed guidance.
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Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Notation -- Conversion Factors -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Structural Concrete -- 1.2 Historical Background -- 1.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Reinforced Concrete -- 1.4 Codes of Practice -- 1.5 Design Philosophy and Concepts -- 1.6 Units of Measurement -- 1.7 Loads -- 1.8 Safety Provisions -- 1.9 Structural Concrete Elements -- 1.10 Structural Concrete Design -- 1.11 Accuracy of Calculations -- 1.12 Concrete High-Rise Buildings -- References -- Chapter 2 Properties of Reinforced Concrete -- 2.1 Factors Affecting Strength of Concrete -- 2.1.1 Water-Cement Ratio -- 2.1.2 Properties and Proportions of Concrete Constituents -- 2.1.3 Method of Mixing and Curing -- 2.1.4 Age of Concrete -- 2.1.5 Loading Conditions -- 2.1.6 Shape and Dimensions of Tested Specimen -- 2.2 Compressive Strength -- 2.3 Stress-Strain Curves of Concrete -- 2.4 Tensile Strength of Concrete -- 2.5 Flexural Strength (Modulus of Rupture) of Concrete -- 2.6 Shear Strength -- 2.7 Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete -- 2.8 Poisson's Ratio -- 2.9 Shear Modulus -- 2.10 Modular Ratio -- 2.11 Volume Changes of Concrete -- 2.11.1 Shrinkage -- 2.11.2 Expansion Due to Rise in Temperature -- 2.12 Creep -- 2.13 Models for Predicting Shrinkage and Creep of Concrete -- 2.13.1 ACI 209R-92 Model -- 2.13.2 B3 Model -- 2.13.4 CEB 90 Model -- 2.13.5 CEB MC 90-99 Model -- 2.13.6 fib MC 2010 Model -- 2.13.7 The AASHTO Model -- 2.14 Unit Weight of Concrete -- 2.15 Fire Resistance -- 2.16 High-Performance Concrete -- 2.17 Lightweight Concrete -- 2.18 Fibrous Concrete -- 2.19 Steel Reinforcement -- 2.19.1 Types of Steel Reinforcement -- 2.19.2 Grades and Strength -- 2.19.3 Stress-Strain Curves -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 3 Flexural Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beams -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Assumptions.

3.3 Behavior of Simply Supported Reinforced Concrete Beam Loaded to Failure -- 3.4 Types of Flexural Failure and Strain Limits -- 3.4.1 Flexural Failure -- 3.4.2 Strain Limits for Tension and Tension-Controlled Sections -- 3.5 Load Factors -- 3.6 Strength Reduction Factor Φ -- 3.7 Significance of Analysis and Design Expressions -- 3.8 Equivalent Compressive Stress Distribution -- 3.9 Singly Reinforced Rectangular Section in Bending -- 3.9.1 Balanced Section -- 3.9.2 Upper Limit of Steel Percentage -- 3.10 Lower Limit or Minimum Percentage of Steel -- 3.11 Adequacy of Sections -- 3.12 Bundled Bars -- 3.13 Sections in the Transition Region (Φ < 0.9) -- 3.14 Rectangular Sections with Compression Reinforcement -- 3.14.1 When Compression Steel Yields -- 3.14.2 When Compression Steel Does Not Yield -- 3.15 Analysis of T- and I-Sections -- 3.15.1 Description -- 3.15.2 Effective Width -- 3.15.3 T-Sections Behaving as Rectangular Sections -- 3.16 Dimensions of Isolated T-Shaped Sections -- 3.17 Inverted L-Shaped Sections -- 3.18 Sections of Other Shapes -- 3.19 Analysis of Sections Using Tables -- 3.20 Additional Examples -- 3.21 Examples Using SI Units -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 4 Flexural Design of Reinforced Concrete Beams -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Rectangular Sections with Tension Reinforcement Only -- 4.3 Spacing of Reinforcement and Concrete Cover -- 4.3.1 Specifications -- 4.3.2 Minimum Width of Concrete Sections -- 4.3.3 Minimum Overall Depth of Concrete Sections -- 4.4 Rectangular Sections with Compression Reinforcement -- 4.4.1 Assuming One Row of Tension Bars -- 4.4.2 Assuming Two Rows of Tension Bars -- 4.5 Design of T-Sections -- 4.6 Additional Examples -- 4.7 Examples Using SI Units -- Summary -- Problems -- Chapter 5 Shear and Diagonal Tension -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Shear Stresses in Concrete Beams.

5.3 Behavior of Beams without Shear Reinforcement -- 5.4 Moment Effect on Shear Strength -- 5.5 Beams with Shear Reinforcement -- 5.6 ACI Code Shear Design Requirements -- 5.6.1 Critical Section for Nominal Shear Strength Calculation -- 5.6.2 Minimum Area of Shear Reinforcement -- 5.6.3 Maximum Shear Carried by Web Reinforcement Vs -- 5.6.4 Maximum Spacing of Stirrups -- 5.6.5 Yield Strength of Shear Reinforcement -- 5.6.6 Anchorage of Stirrups -- 5.6.7 Stirrups Adjacent to the Support -- 5.6.8 Effective Length of Bent Bars -- 5.7 Design of Vertical Stirrups -- 5.8 Design Summary -- 5.9 Shear Force Due to Live Loads -- 5.10 Shear Stresses in Members of Variable Depth -- 5.11 Examples Using SI Units -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 6 Deflection and Control of Cracking -- 6.1 Deflection of Structural Concrete Members -- 6.2 Instantaneous Deflection -- 6.2.1 Modulus of Elasticity -- 6.2.2 Modular Ratio -- 6.2.3 Cracking Moment -- 6.2.4 Moment of Inertia -- 6.2.5 Properties of Sections -- 6.3 Long-Time Deflection -- 6.4 Allowable Deflection -- 6.5 Deflection Due to Combinations of Loads -- 6.6 Cracks in Flexural Members -- 6.7 ACI Code Requirements -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 7 Development Length of Reinforcing Bars -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Development of Bond Stresses -- 7.2.1 Flexural Bond -- 7.2.2 Tests for Bond Efficiency -- 7.3 Development Length in Tension -- 7.3.1 Development Length, Id -- 7.3.2 ACI Code Factors for Calculating ld for Bars in Tension -- 7.3.3 Simplified Expressions for Id -- 7.4 Development Length in Compression -- 7.5 Summary for Computation of ID in Tension -- 7.6 Critical Sections in Flexural Members -- 7.7 Standard Hooks (ACI Code, Sections 25.3 and 25.4) -- 7.8 Splices of Reinforcement -- 7.8.1 General -- 7.8.2 Lap Splices in Tension, lst -- 7.8.3 Lap Splice in Compression, lsc.

7.8.4 Lap Splice in Columns -- 7.9 Moment-Resistance Diagram (Bar Cutoff Points) -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 8 Design of Deep Beams by the Strut-and-Tie Method -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 B- and D-Regions -- 8.3 Strut-and-Tie Model -- 8.4 ACI Design Procedure to Build a Strut-and-Tie Model -- 8.4.1 Model Requirements -- 8.4.2 Check for Shear Resistance -- 8.4.3 Design Steps According to ACI Section 23.2 -- 8.4.4 Design Requirements According to ACI -- 8.5 Strut-and-Tie Method According to AASHTO LRFD -- 8.6 Deep Members -- 8.6.1 Analysis and Behavior of Deep Beams -- 8.6.2 Design of Deep Beams Using Strut-and-Tie Model -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 9 One-Way Slabs -- 9.1 Types of Slabs -- 9.2 Design of One-Way Solid Slabs -- 9.3 Design Limitations According to ACI Code -- 9.4 Temperature and Shrinkage Reinforcement -- 9.5 Reinforcement Details -- 9.6 Distribution of Loads from One-Way Slabs to Supporting Beams -- 9.7 One-Way Joist Floor System -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 10 Axially Loaded Columns -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Types of Columns -- 10.3 Behavior of Axially Loaded Columns -- 10.4 ACI Code Limitations -- 10.5 Spiral Reinforcement -- 10.6 Design Equations -- 10.7 Axial Tension -- 10.8 Long Columns -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 11 Members in Compression and Bending -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Design Assumptions for Columns -- 11.3 Load-Moment Interaction Diagram -- 11.4 Safety Provisions -- 11.5 Balanced Condition: Rectangular Sections -- 11.6 Column Sections under Eccentric Loading -- 11.7 Strength of Columns for Tension Failure -- 11.8 Strength of Columns for Compression Failure -- 11.8.1 Trial Solution -- 11.8.2 Numerical Analysis Solution -- 11.8.3 Approximate Solution -- 11.9 Interaction Diagram Example -- 11.10 Rectangular Columns with Side Bars.

11.11 Load Capacity of Circular Columns -- 11.11.1 Balanced Condition -- 11.11.2 Strength of Circular Columns for Compression Failure -- 11.11.3 Strength of Circular Columns for Tension Failure -- 11.12 Analysis and Design of Columns Using Charts -- 11.13 Design of Columns under Eccentric Loading -- 11.13.1 Design of Columns for Compression Failure -- 11.13.2 Design of Columns for Tension Failure -- 11.14 Biaxial Bending -- 11.15 Circular Columns with Uniform Reinforcement under Biaxial Bending -- 11.16 Square and Rectangular Columns under Biaxial Bending -- 11.16.1 Bresler Reciprocal Method -- 11.16.2 Bresler Load Contour Method -- 11.17 Parme Load Contour Method -- 11.18 Equation of Failure Surface -- 11.19 SI Example -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 12 Slender Columns -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Effective Column Length (Klu) -- 12.3 Effective Length Factor (K) -- 12.4 Member Stiffness (EI) -- 12.5 Limitation of the Slenderness Ratio (Klu/r) -- 12.5.1 Nonsway Frames -- 12.5.2 Sway Frames -- 12.6 Moment-Magnifier Design Method -- 12.6.1 Introduction -- 12.6.2 Magnified Moments in Nonsway Frames -- 12.6.3 Magnified Moments in Sway Frames -- Summary -- References -- Problems -- Chapter 13 Footings -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Types of Footings -- 13.3 Distribution of Soil Pressure -- 13.4 Design Considerations -- 13.4.1 Size of Footings -- 13.4.2 One-Way Shear (Beam Shear) (Vu1 ) -- 13.4.3 Two-Way Shear (Punching Shear) (Vu2 ) -- 13.4.4 Flexural Strength and Footing Reinforcement -- 13.4.5 Bearing Capacity of Column at Base -- 13.4.6 Development Length of the Reinforcing Bars -- 13.4.7 Differential Settlement (Balanced Footing Design) -- 13.5 Plain Concrete Footings -- 13.6 Combined Footings -- 13.7 Footings under Eccentric Column Loads -- 13.8 Footings under Biaxial Moment -- 13.9 Slabs on Ground -- 13.10 Footings on Piles.

13.11 SI Equations.

The most up to date structural concrete text, with the latest ACI revisions Structural Concrete is the bestselling text on concrete structural design and analysis, providing the latest information and clear explanation in an easy to understand style. Newly updated to reflect the latest ACI 318-14 code, this sixth edition emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the subject, and builds the student's body of knowledge by presenting design methods alongside relevant standards and code. Numerous examples and practice problems help readers grasp the real-world application of the industry's best practices, with explanations and insight on the extensive ACI revision. Each chapter features examples using SI units and US-SI conversion factors, and SI unit design tables are included for reference. Exceptional weather-resistance and stability make concrete a preferred construction material for most parts of the world. For civil and structural engineering applications, rebar and steel beams are generally added during casting to provide additional support. Pre-cast concrete is becoming increasingly common, allowing better quality control, the use of special admixtures, and the production of innovative shapes that would be too complex to construct on site. This book provides complete guidance toward all aspects of reinforced concrete design, including the ACI revisions that address these new practices. Review the properties of reinforced concrete, with models for shrink and creep Understand shear, diagonal tension, axial loading, and torsion Learn planning considerations for reinforced beams and strut and tie Design retaining walls, footings, slender columns, stairs, and more The American Concrete Institute updates structural concrete code approximately every three years, and it's critical that students learn the most recent standards and best practices.

Structural Concrete provides the most up to date information, with intuitive explanation and detailed guidance.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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