Amazon cover image
Image from Amazon.com

Biotechnology of Bioactive Compounds : Sources and Applications.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (745 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781118733479
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Biotechnology of Bioactive Compounds : Sources and ApplicationsDDC classification:
  • 664
LOC classification:
  • TP248.65.F66.B639 2
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of contributors -- Foreword -- Preface -- Section I Bioactive compounds from diverse plant, microbial, and marine sources -- Chapter 1 Bioactive compounds from vegetable and fruit by-products -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Beneficial health effects obtained by consuming vegetable and fruit products rich in phytochemicals -- 1.3 By-products from vegetable and fruit processing to obtain phytochemicals -- 1.4 Vegetable by-products -- 1.5 Fruit by-products -- 1.6 Pretreatment and extraction systems -- References -- Chapter 2 Bioactive compounds in fresh-cut fruits: Occurrence and impact of processing and cold storage -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Factors affecting quality and phytochemical content of fresh-cut fruits -- 2.3 Raw material -- 2.4 Effect of minimal processing: Major operations -- 2.5 Effect of atmosphere composition and temperature during storage -- 2.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 3 Pressurized hot water extraction of polyphenols from plant material -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Polyphenols: Key bioactive compounds -- 3.3 Pressurized hot water extraction process -- 3.4 Pressurized hot water extraction to isolate plant polyphenols -- 3.5 Conclusions -- 3.6 Future research -- References -- Chapter 4 Bioactive compounds in cereals: Technological and nutritional properties -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Cereal bioactive compounds -- 4.3 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 5 Antimicrobials from medicinal plants: Research initiatives, challenges, and the future prospects -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Medicinal plants: An untapped source of antimicrobials -- 5.3 Antimicrobial phytochemicals -- 5.4 Mode of action -- 5.5 Challenges -- 5.6 Future prospects -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Chapter 6 Coccoloba uvifera as a source of components with antioxidant activity.
6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Materials and methods -- 6.3 In vitro antioxidant properties -- 6.4 Statistical analysis -- 6.5 Results and discussion -- 6.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7 Bioactive compounds and medical significance of some endangered medicinal plants from the Western Ghats region of India -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Western Ghats (Sahyadri ranges) -- 7.3 Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa (Rutaceae) -- 7.4 Aristolochia indica L. (Aristolochiaceae) -- 7.5 Baliospermum montanum (Willd.) Muell-arg (Euphorbiaceae) -- 7.6 Coscinium fenestratum (Gaertn.) Coleb. (Menispermaceae) -- 7.7 Decalepis hamiltonii Wight & Arn. (Periplocaceae) -- 7.8 Eugenia singampattiana Bedd. (Myrtaceae) -- 7.9 Oroxylum indicum (L.) Benth.Ex Kurz (Bignoniaceae) -- 7.10 Pterocarpus santalinus L. (Fabaceae) -- 7.11 Rauvolfia serpentina (L.) Benth. ex Kurz (Apocyanaceae) -- 7.12 Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn. (Dioscoreaceae) -- 7.13 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 8 Fungal bioactive compounds: An overview -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Bioactive compounds or biological activity -- 8.3 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 9 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Association and production of bioactive compounds in plants -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Plant fungal endophytes -- 9.3 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and biocompounds -- 9.4 Ectomycorrhizas and biocompounds -- 9.5 Plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and DSE -- 9.6 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and medicinal plants -- 9.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 10 Extremophiles as source of novel bioactive compounds with industrial potential -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Thermophiles -- 10.3 Psychrophiles -- 10.4 Alkaliphiles -- 10.5 Acidophiles -- 10.6 Halophiles -- 10.7 Piezophiles -- 10.8 Radiophiles -- 10.9 Metallophiles -- 10.10 Polyextremophiles -- 10.11 Conclusion.
References -- Chapter 11 New trends in microbial production of natural complex bioactive isoprenoids -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Isoprenoids -- 11.3 Metabolic engineering of the mevalonate (MEV) pathway -- 11.4 Metabolic engineering of the MEP pathway for isoprenoids production -- 11.5 Modeling and simulation approaches -- 11.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 12 Production of C-phycocyanin and its potential applications -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Production of C-phycocyanin -- 12.3 Photoautotrophic production -- 12.4 Mixotrophic production -- 12.5 Heterotrophic production -- 12.6 Recombinant production -- 12.7 C-phycocyanin as a natural dye -- 12.8 Application of C-phycocyanin as an additive in food and cosmetics -- 12.9 Diagnostic applications of C-phycocyanin -- 12.10 Nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications -- 12.11 Anticancerous activity -- 12.12 Future prospects -- References -- Section II Chemistry, biotechnology, and industrial relevance -- Chapter 13 Glycosides: From biosynthesis to biological activity toward therapeutic application -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Glycosides -- 13.3 Classification -- 13.4 Hydrolysis -- 13.5 Chemical properties and identification -- 13.6 Biologic activity and therapeutic applications -- 13.7 Case studies: From production to therapeutic application -- 13.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14 Trehalose mimics as bioactive compounds -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Trehalose processing enzymes and trehalose mimetics as bioactive compounds -- 14.3 Trehalose-processing mycolyltransesterase enzymes -- 14.4 Trehalose-processing sulfotransferase -- 14.5 Acyl2SGL mimetics: Novel potential antitubercular vaccines -- 14.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 15 Virtual screening and prediction of the molecular mechanism of bioactive compounds in silico -- 15.1 Introduction.
15.2 Ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) -- 15.3 Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) -- 15.4 Reverse docking approach for predicting biological activity of compounds -- 15.5 Predicting molecular targets responsible for antiaging properties of artemisinic acid -- 15.6 Advanced options -- 15.7 Predicting molecular targets of D-pinitol responsible for antioxidant activity in a C. elegans model using computational approaches -- 15.8 Future directions -- References -- Chapter 16 Steroids in natural matrices: Chemical features and bioactive properties -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Structure and classification -- 16.3 Bioavailability of steroids -- 16.4 Biosynthesis -- 16.5 Analytical methods -- 16.6 Biological activity -- 16.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 17 Bioactive compounds obtained through biotechnology -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Antioxidant compounds -- 17.3 Anticancer compounds -- 17.4 Antimicrobial compounds -- 17.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 18 Metabolic engineering of bioactive compounds in berries -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Engineering of berry secondary metabolites -- 18.3 Enhanced secondary metabolite production by elicitation -- 18.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 19 Food-derived multifunctional bioactive proteins and peptides: Sources and production -- 19.1 Bioactive peptides: Overview -- 19.2 Multifunctional food peptides -- 19.3 Milk-derived multifunctional proteins and peptides -- 19.4 Egg-derived multifunctional proteins and peptides -- 19.5 Plant protein-derived multifunctional peptides -- 19.6 Perspectives in production -- 19.7 Bioprocess-based research challenges -- 19.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 20 Food-derived multifunctional bioactive proteins and peptides: Applications and recent advances -- 20.1 Applications of multifunctional peptides -- 20.2 Pharmaceutical products.
20.3 Dermopharmaceutical products -- 20.4 Recent advances and emerging technologies -- 20.5 Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models -- 20.6 Research concerns and bottlenecks -- 20.7 Conclusions and future projections -- References -- Section III Biochemistry and nutraceutical or health-related applications -- Chapter 21 An overview of the molecular and cellular interactions of some bioactive compounds -- 21.1 Introduction -- 21.2 Prokaryotic versus eukaryotic -- 21.3 lac operon -- 21.4 The structure of β-globin in sickle cell anemia -- 21.5 Direct reversal pathway for Dna repair -- 21.6 Oxidants, free radicals, and antioxidants: The balance -- 21.7 The "nutritional genomics" -- 21.8 Food affects our genes -- 21.9 Active antitumor compounds from medicinal plant -- 21.10 Structure of plant bioactive compounds -- 21.11 Bioactive compounds not always friends -- 21.12 Use of drug combinations -- 21.13 Screening for the presence of alkaloids and/or nitrogenous bases and flavonoids in plant extracts -- 21.14 Protocol for in vitro detection of antioxidants -- 21.15 Determination of AHH activity -- 21.16 Determination of microsomal hydrogen peroxide -- 21.17 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 22 Bioactive compounds as growth factors and 3D matrix materials in stem cell research -- 22.1 Introduction -- 22.2 Prominent growth factors -- 22.3 Biotic scaffolds for tissue regeneration -- 22.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 23 Phytosterols: Biological effects and mechanisms of hypocholesterolemic action -- 23.1 Introduction -- 23.2 Phytosterols -- 23.3 Other biological effects -- 23.4 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 24 Overview of the role of food bioactive compounds as complementary therapy for celiac disease -- 24.1 Introduction -- 24.2 Gliadins-mediated alterations in intestinal epithelium.
24.3 Gluten-free diet (GFD) and nutrition.
Summary: Bioactive compounds play a central role in high-value product development in the chemical industry. Bioactive compounds have been identified from diverse sources and their therapeutic benefits, nutritional value and protective effects in human and animal healthcare have underpinned their application as pharmaceuticals and functional food ingredients. The orderly study of biologically active products and the exploration of potential biological activities of these secondary metabolites, including their clinical applications, standardization, quality control, mode of action and potential biomolecular interactions, has emerged as one of the most exciting developments in modern natural medicine. Biotechnology of Bioactive Compounds describes the current stage of knowledge on the production of bioactive compounds from microbial, algal and vegetable sources. In addition, the molecular approach for screening bioactive compounds is also discussed, as well as examples of applications of these compounds on human health. The first half of the book comprises information on diverse sources of bioactive compounds, ranging from microorganisms and algae to plants and dietary foods. The second half of the book reviews synthetic approaches, as well as selected bioactivities and biotechnological and biomedical potential. The bioactive compounds profiled include compounds such as C-phycocyanins, glycosides, phytosterols and natural steroids. An overview of the usage of bioactive compounds as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, anti-allergic compounds and in stem cell research is also presented, along with an overview of the medicinal applications of plant-derived compounds. Biotechnology of Bioactive Compounds will be an informative text for undergraduate and graduate students of bio-medicinal chemistry who are keen to explore the potential of bioactiveSummary: natural products. It also provides useful information for scientists working in various research fields where natural products have a primary role.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF-N0001445
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP-N0001445
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of contributors -- Foreword -- Preface -- Section I Bioactive compounds from diverse plant, microbial, and marine sources -- Chapter 1 Bioactive compounds from vegetable and fruit by-products -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Beneficial health effects obtained by consuming vegetable and fruit products rich in phytochemicals -- 1.3 By-products from vegetable and fruit processing to obtain phytochemicals -- 1.4 Vegetable by-products -- 1.5 Fruit by-products -- 1.6 Pretreatment and extraction systems -- References -- Chapter 2 Bioactive compounds in fresh-cut fruits: Occurrence and impact of processing and cold storage -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Factors affecting quality and phytochemical content of fresh-cut fruits -- 2.3 Raw material -- 2.4 Effect of minimal processing: Major operations -- 2.5 Effect of atmosphere composition and temperature during storage -- 2.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 3 Pressurized hot water extraction of polyphenols from plant material -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Polyphenols: Key bioactive compounds -- 3.3 Pressurized hot water extraction process -- 3.4 Pressurized hot water extraction to isolate plant polyphenols -- 3.5 Conclusions -- 3.6 Future research -- References -- Chapter 4 Bioactive compounds in cereals: Technological and nutritional properties -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Cereal bioactive compounds -- 4.3 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 5 Antimicrobials from medicinal plants: Research initiatives, challenges, and the future prospects -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Medicinal plants: An untapped source of antimicrobials -- 5.3 Antimicrobial phytochemicals -- 5.4 Mode of action -- 5.5 Challenges -- 5.6 Future prospects -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Chapter 6 Coccoloba uvifera as a source of components with antioxidant activity.

6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Materials and methods -- 6.3 In vitro antioxidant properties -- 6.4 Statistical analysis -- 6.5 Results and discussion -- 6.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7 Bioactive compounds and medical significance of some endangered medicinal plants from the Western Ghats region of India -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Western Ghats (Sahyadri ranges) -- 7.3 Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa (Rutaceae) -- 7.4 Aristolochia indica L. (Aristolochiaceae) -- 7.5 Baliospermum montanum (Willd.) Muell-arg (Euphorbiaceae) -- 7.6 Coscinium fenestratum (Gaertn.) Coleb. (Menispermaceae) -- 7.7 Decalepis hamiltonii Wight & Arn. (Periplocaceae) -- 7.8 Eugenia singampattiana Bedd. (Myrtaceae) -- 7.9 Oroxylum indicum (L.) Benth.Ex Kurz (Bignoniaceae) -- 7.10 Pterocarpus santalinus L. (Fabaceae) -- 7.11 Rauvolfia serpentina (L.) Benth. ex Kurz (Apocyanaceae) -- 7.12 Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn. (Dioscoreaceae) -- 7.13 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 8 Fungal bioactive compounds: An overview -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Bioactive compounds or biological activity -- 8.3 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 9 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Association and production of bioactive compounds in plants -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Plant fungal endophytes -- 9.3 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and biocompounds -- 9.4 Ectomycorrhizas and biocompounds -- 9.5 Plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and DSE -- 9.6 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and medicinal plants -- 9.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 10 Extremophiles as source of novel bioactive compounds with industrial potential -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Thermophiles -- 10.3 Psychrophiles -- 10.4 Alkaliphiles -- 10.5 Acidophiles -- 10.6 Halophiles -- 10.7 Piezophiles -- 10.8 Radiophiles -- 10.9 Metallophiles -- 10.10 Polyextremophiles -- 10.11 Conclusion.

References -- Chapter 11 New trends in microbial production of natural complex bioactive isoprenoids -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Isoprenoids -- 11.3 Metabolic engineering of the mevalonate (MEV) pathway -- 11.4 Metabolic engineering of the MEP pathway for isoprenoids production -- 11.5 Modeling and simulation approaches -- 11.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 12 Production of C-phycocyanin and its potential applications -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Production of C-phycocyanin -- 12.3 Photoautotrophic production -- 12.4 Mixotrophic production -- 12.5 Heterotrophic production -- 12.6 Recombinant production -- 12.7 C-phycocyanin as a natural dye -- 12.8 Application of C-phycocyanin as an additive in food and cosmetics -- 12.9 Diagnostic applications of C-phycocyanin -- 12.10 Nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications -- 12.11 Anticancerous activity -- 12.12 Future prospects -- References -- Section II Chemistry, biotechnology, and industrial relevance -- Chapter 13 Glycosides: From biosynthesis to biological activity toward therapeutic application -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Glycosides -- 13.3 Classification -- 13.4 Hydrolysis -- 13.5 Chemical properties and identification -- 13.6 Biologic activity and therapeutic applications -- 13.7 Case studies: From production to therapeutic application -- 13.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14 Trehalose mimics as bioactive compounds -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Trehalose processing enzymes and trehalose mimetics as bioactive compounds -- 14.3 Trehalose-processing mycolyltransesterase enzymes -- 14.4 Trehalose-processing sulfotransferase -- 14.5 Acyl2SGL mimetics: Novel potential antitubercular vaccines -- 14.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 15 Virtual screening and prediction of the molecular mechanism of bioactive compounds in silico -- 15.1 Introduction.

15.2 Ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) -- 15.3 Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) -- 15.4 Reverse docking approach for predicting biological activity of compounds -- 15.5 Predicting molecular targets responsible for antiaging properties of artemisinic acid -- 15.6 Advanced options -- 15.7 Predicting molecular targets of D-pinitol responsible for antioxidant activity in a C. elegans model using computational approaches -- 15.8 Future directions -- References -- Chapter 16 Steroids in natural matrices: Chemical features and bioactive properties -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Structure and classification -- 16.3 Bioavailability of steroids -- 16.4 Biosynthesis -- 16.5 Analytical methods -- 16.6 Biological activity -- 16.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 17 Bioactive compounds obtained through biotechnology -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Antioxidant compounds -- 17.3 Anticancer compounds -- 17.4 Antimicrobial compounds -- 17.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 18 Metabolic engineering of bioactive compounds in berries -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Engineering of berry secondary metabolites -- 18.3 Enhanced secondary metabolite production by elicitation -- 18.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 19 Food-derived multifunctional bioactive proteins and peptides: Sources and production -- 19.1 Bioactive peptides: Overview -- 19.2 Multifunctional food peptides -- 19.3 Milk-derived multifunctional proteins and peptides -- 19.4 Egg-derived multifunctional proteins and peptides -- 19.5 Plant protein-derived multifunctional peptides -- 19.6 Perspectives in production -- 19.7 Bioprocess-based research challenges -- 19.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 20 Food-derived multifunctional bioactive proteins and peptides: Applications and recent advances -- 20.1 Applications of multifunctional peptides -- 20.2 Pharmaceutical products.

20.3 Dermopharmaceutical products -- 20.4 Recent advances and emerging technologies -- 20.5 Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models -- 20.6 Research concerns and bottlenecks -- 20.7 Conclusions and future projections -- References -- Section III Biochemistry and nutraceutical or health-related applications -- Chapter 21 An overview of the molecular and cellular interactions of some bioactive compounds -- 21.1 Introduction -- 21.2 Prokaryotic versus eukaryotic -- 21.3 lac operon -- 21.4 The structure of β-globin in sickle cell anemia -- 21.5 Direct reversal pathway for Dna repair -- 21.6 Oxidants, free radicals, and antioxidants: The balance -- 21.7 The "nutritional genomics" -- 21.8 Food affects our genes -- 21.9 Active antitumor compounds from medicinal plant -- 21.10 Structure of plant bioactive compounds -- 21.11 Bioactive compounds not always friends -- 21.12 Use of drug combinations -- 21.13 Screening for the presence of alkaloids and/or nitrogenous bases and flavonoids in plant extracts -- 21.14 Protocol for in vitro detection of antioxidants -- 21.15 Determination of AHH activity -- 21.16 Determination of microsomal hydrogen peroxide -- 21.17 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 22 Bioactive compounds as growth factors and 3D matrix materials in stem cell research -- 22.1 Introduction -- 22.2 Prominent growth factors -- 22.3 Biotic scaffolds for tissue regeneration -- 22.4 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 23 Phytosterols: Biological effects and mechanisms of hypocholesterolemic action -- 23.1 Introduction -- 23.2 Phytosterols -- 23.3 Other biological effects -- 23.4 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 24 Overview of the role of food bioactive compounds as complementary therapy for celiac disease -- 24.1 Introduction -- 24.2 Gliadins-mediated alterations in intestinal epithelium.

24.3 Gluten-free diet (GFD) and nutrition.

Bioactive compounds play a central role in high-value product development in the chemical industry. Bioactive compounds have been identified from diverse sources and their therapeutic benefits, nutritional value and protective effects in human and animal healthcare have underpinned their application as pharmaceuticals and functional food ingredients. The orderly study of biologically active products and the exploration of potential biological activities of these secondary metabolites, including their clinical applications, standardization, quality control, mode of action and potential biomolecular interactions, has emerged as one of the most exciting developments in modern natural medicine. Biotechnology of Bioactive Compounds describes the current stage of knowledge on the production of bioactive compounds from microbial, algal and vegetable sources. In addition, the molecular approach for screening bioactive compounds is also discussed, as well as examples of applications of these compounds on human health. The first half of the book comprises information on diverse sources of bioactive compounds, ranging from microorganisms and algae to plants and dietary foods. The second half of the book reviews synthetic approaches, as well as selected bioactivities and biotechnological and biomedical potential. The bioactive compounds profiled include compounds such as C-phycocyanins, glycosides, phytosterols and natural steroids. An overview of the usage of bioactive compounds as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, anti-allergic compounds and in stem cell research is also presented, along with an overview of the medicinal applications of plant-derived compounds. Biotechnology of Bioactive Compounds will be an informative text for undergraduate and graduate students of bio-medicinal chemistry who are keen to explore the potential of bioactive

natural products. It also provides useful information for scientists working in various research fields where natural products have a primary role.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.