COBOL Software Modernization.

By: Barbier, Franck
Contributor(s): Recoussine, Jean-Luc
Publisher: Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (282 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781119073086Subject(s): COBOL (Computer program language);Software architectureGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: COBOL Software ModernizationDDC classification: 005.1 LOC classification: QA76.73.C25 -- .B373 2015ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Acronyms -- Introduction -- I.1. Behind software modernization is "modernization": the car metaphor -- I.2. COBOL -- I.3. Why the Cloud? -- I.4. Legacy2Cloud -- I.5. Human weight on successful modernization -- I.6. This book's structure -- 1: Software Modernization: a Business Vision -- 1.1. Software-based business -- 1.2. Information-driven business -- 1.2.1. Adaptation to business -- 1.3. The case of tourism industry -- 1.4. IT progress acceleration -- 1.5. Legacy world -- 1.5.1. Exiting the legacy world -- 1.5.2. Legacy world professionals -- 1.6. Conclusions -- 2: Software Modernization: Technical Environment -- 2.1. Legacy system -- 2.2. Modernization -- 2.2.1. Replacement -- 2.2.2. Migration -- 2.2.3. Modernization versus migration -- 2.2.4. The superiority of white-box modernization -- 2.3. Software engineering principles underpinning modernization -- 2.3.1. Re-engineering in action -- 2.3.2. Re-engineering challenges -- 2.4. Conclusions -- 3: Status of COBOL Legacy Applications -- 3.1. OLTP versus batch programs -- 3.2. Mainframes -- 3.3. Data-driven design -- 3.4. COBOL degeneration principle -- 3.5. COBOL pitfalls -- 3.6. Middleware for COBOL -- 3.7. Moving COBOL OLTP/batch programs to Java -- 3.8. COBOL is not a friend of Java, and vice versa -- 3.9. Spaghetti code -- 3.9.1. Spaghetti code sample -- 3.9.2. Code comprehension -- 3.10. No longer COBOL? -- 3.11. Conclusions -- 4: Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) -- 4.1. Software architecture versus information system urbanization -- 4.2. Software architecture evolution -- 4.3. COBOL own style of software architecture -- 4.4. The one-way road to SOA -- 4.5. Characterization of SOA -- 4.5.1. Preliminary note -- 4.5.2. From objects to components and services -- 4.5.3. Type versus instance -- 4.5.4. Distribution concerns.
4.5.5. Functional grouping -- 4.5.6. Granularity -- 4.5.7. Technology-centrism -- 4.5.8. Composition at design time (… is definitely modeling) -- 4.5.9. Composition at runtime -- 4.6. Conclusions -- 5: SOA in Action -- 5.1. Service as materialized component -- 5.2. Service as Internet resource -- 5.2.1. Pay-per-use service -- 5.2.2. Free service -- 5.2.3. Data feed service -- 5.3. High-end SOA -- 5.4. SOA challenges -- 5.5. The Cloud -- 5.5.1. COBOL in the Cloud -- 5.5.2. Computing is just resource consumption -- 5.5.3. Cloud computing is also resource consumption, but… -- 5.5.4. Everything as a service -- 5.5.5. SOA in the Cloud -- 5.5.6. The cloud counterparts -- 5.6. Conclusions -- 6: Model-Driven Development (MDD) -- 6.1. Why MDD? -- 6.2. Models, intuitively -- 6.3. Models, formally -- 6.4. Models as computerized objects -- 6.5. Model-based productivity -- 6.6. Openness through standards -- 6.6.1. Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) -- 6.7. Models and people -- 6.8. Metamodeling -- 6.8.1. Metamodeling, put simply -- 6.9. Model transformation -- 6.10. Model transformation by example -- 6.11. From contemplative to executable models -- 6.12. Model execution in action -- 6.13. Toward Domain-Specific Modeling Languages (DSMLs) -- 6.14. Conclusions -- 7: Model-Driven Software Modernization -- 7.1. Reverse and forward engineering are indivisible components of modernization -- 7.2. Architecture-Driven Modernization (ADM) -- 7.3. ASTM and KDM at a glance -- 7.4. Variations on ASTM -- 7.5. From ASTM to KDM -- 7.6. Variations on KDM -- 7.7. Automation -- 7.8. Conclusions -- 8: Software Modernization Method and Tool -- 8.1. BLU AGE overview -- 8.2. The toolbox -- 8.2.1. BLU AGE format required for forward engineering -- 8.2.2. Reverse tooling -- 8.2.2.1. Views and perspectives -- 8.2.2.2. UI extraction -- 8.2.2.3. Annotations.
8.2.2.4. Pattern selection and application -- 8.2.2.5. Data item extraction -- 8.2.2.6. Transmodeling as business logic (rules and functionalities) extraction -- 8.3. BLU AGE as an ADM- and MDA-compliant tool -- 8.4. Modernization workflow -- 8.4.1. Initialization -- 8.4.1.1. Explore artifacts -- 8.4.1.2. Support grammar -- 8.4.1.3. Extract -- 8.4.1.4. Understand legacy structure -- 8.4.1.5. Organize collaborative work for code sources and model -- 8.4.1.6. Set up environments, support continuous integration -- 8.4.1.7. Database modernization -- 8.4.1.8. Define patterns, apply patterns on whole legacy code -- 8.4.1.9. Define target architecture, update/create BSPs -- 8.4.1.10. Build productivity tools -- 8.4.1.11. Define iterations -- 8.4.2. Realization -- 8.4.2.1. Annotate -- 8.4.2.2. Transmodeling -- 8.4.2.3. Modeling -- 8.4.2.4. Generate and perform unit test -- 8.4.2.5. Design automatic "happy path" unit test -- 8.4.3. Validation and deployment -- 8.4.3.1. Run automated tests -- 8.4.3.2. Run tests manually -- 8.4.3.3. Define migration strategy and plan -- 8.4.3.4. Perform data migration -- 8.4.3.5. Execute migration plan -- 8.5. Conclusions -- 9: Case Study -- 9.1. Case study presentation -- 9.2. Legacy modernization in action -- 9.2.1. Creating modernization project -- 9.2.2. Better dealing with the legacy material -- 9.2.3. Strategy for modernizing screens -- 9.2.4. Strategy for modernizing data items -- 9.2.5. Creating forward project -- 9.2.6. Entity extraction -- 9.2.7. From screens to pages and UI components -- 9.3. Annotations -- 9.4. Pattern definition -- 9.4.1. Pattern for simple statements -- 9.4.2. Patterns for operation calls -- 9.4.3. Patterns for operation calls with arguments -- 9.4. Database exchange modernization -- 9.5. Transmodeling -- 9.6. Transmodeling complex functionalities -- 9.6.1. Transmodeling the "custCost" program.
9.6.2. Modernizing "Add a new reservation" -- 9.7. Application generation and testing -- 9.8. Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: Nowadays, billions of lines of code are in the COBOL programming language. This book is an analysis, a diagnosis, a strategy, a MDD method and a tool to transform legacy COBOL into modernized applications that comply with Internet computing, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and the Cloud.  It serves as a blueprint for those in charge of finding solutions to this considerable challenge.
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Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Acronyms -- Introduction -- I.1. Behind software modernization is "modernization": the car metaphor -- I.2. COBOL -- I.3. Why the Cloud? -- I.4. Legacy2Cloud -- I.5. Human weight on successful modernization -- I.6. This book's structure -- 1: Software Modernization: a Business Vision -- 1.1. Software-based business -- 1.2. Information-driven business -- 1.2.1. Adaptation to business -- 1.3. The case of tourism industry -- 1.4. IT progress acceleration -- 1.5. Legacy world -- 1.5.1. Exiting the legacy world -- 1.5.2. Legacy world professionals -- 1.6. Conclusions -- 2: Software Modernization: Technical Environment -- 2.1. Legacy system -- 2.2. Modernization -- 2.2.1. Replacement -- 2.2.2. Migration -- 2.2.3. Modernization versus migration -- 2.2.4. The superiority of white-box modernization -- 2.3. Software engineering principles underpinning modernization -- 2.3.1. Re-engineering in action -- 2.3.2. Re-engineering challenges -- 2.4. Conclusions -- 3: Status of COBOL Legacy Applications -- 3.1. OLTP versus batch programs -- 3.2. Mainframes -- 3.3. Data-driven design -- 3.4. COBOL degeneration principle -- 3.5. COBOL pitfalls -- 3.6. Middleware for COBOL -- 3.7. Moving COBOL OLTP/batch programs to Java -- 3.8. COBOL is not a friend of Java, and vice versa -- 3.9. Spaghetti code -- 3.9.1. Spaghetti code sample -- 3.9.2. Code comprehension -- 3.10. No longer COBOL? -- 3.11. Conclusions -- 4: Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) -- 4.1. Software architecture versus information system urbanization -- 4.2. Software architecture evolution -- 4.3. COBOL own style of software architecture -- 4.4. The one-way road to SOA -- 4.5. Characterization of SOA -- 4.5.1. Preliminary note -- 4.5.2. From objects to components and services -- 4.5.3. Type versus instance -- 4.5.4. Distribution concerns.

4.5.5. Functional grouping -- 4.5.6. Granularity -- 4.5.7. Technology-centrism -- 4.5.8. Composition at design time (… is definitely modeling) -- 4.5.9. Composition at runtime -- 4.6. Conclusions -- 5: SOA in Action -- 5.1. Service as materialized component -- 5.2. Service as Internet resource -- 5.2.1. Pay-per-use service -- 5.2.2. Free service -- 5.2.3. Data feed service -- 5.3. High-end SOA -- 5.4. SOA challenges -- 5.5. The Cloud -- 5.5.1. COBOL in the Cloud -- 5.5.2. Computing is just resource consumption -- 5.5.3. Cloud computing is also resource consumption, but… -- 5.5.4. Everything as a service -- 5.5.5. SOA in the Cloud -- 5.5.6. The cloud counterparts -- 5.6. Conclusions -- 6: Model-Driven Development (MDD) -- 6.1. Why MDD? -- 6.2. Models, intuitively -- 6.3. Models, formally -- 6.4. Models as computerized objects -- 6.5. Model-based productivity -- 6.6. Openness through standards -- 6.6.1. Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) -- 6.7. Models and people -- 6.8. Metamodeling -- 6.8.1. Metamodeling, put simply -- 6.9. Model transformation -- 6.10. Model transformation by example -- 6.11. From contemplative to executable models -- 6.12. Model execution in action -- 6.13. Toward Domain-Specific Modeling Languages (DSMLs) -- 6.14. Conclusions -- 7: Model-Driven Software Modernization -- 7.1. Reverse and forward engineering are indivisible components of modernization -- 7.2. Architecture-Driven Modernization (ADM) -- 7.3. ASTM and KDM at a glance -- 7.4. Variations on ASTM -- 7.5. From ASTM to KDM -- 7.6. Variations on KDM -- 7.7. Automation -- 7.8. Conclusions -- 8: Software Modernization Method and Tool -- 8.1. BLU AGE overview -- 8.2. The toolbox -- 8.2.1. BLU AGE format required for forward engineering -- 8.2.2. Reverse tooling -- 8.2.2.1. Views and perspectives -- 8.2.2.2. UI extraction -- 8.2.2.3. Annotations.

8.2.2.4. Pattern selection and application -- 8.2.2.5. Data item extraction -- 8.2.2.6. Transmodeling as business logic (rules and functionalities) extraction -- 8.3. BLU AGE as an ADM- and MDA-compliant tool -- 8.4. Modernization workflow -- 8.4.1. Initialization -- 8.4.1.1. Explore artifacts -- 8.4.1.2. Support grammar -- 8.4.1.3. Extract -- 8.4.1.4. Understand legacy structure -- 8.4.1.5. Organize collaborative work for code sources and model -- 8.4.1.6. Set up environments, support continuous integration -- 8.4.1.7. Database modernization -- 8.4.1.8. Define patterns, apply patterns on whole legacy code -- 8.4.1.9. Define target architecture, update/create BSPs -- 8.4.1.10. Build productivity tools -- 8.4.1.11. Define iterations -- 8.4.2. Realization -- 8.4.2.1. Annotate -- 8.4.2.2. Transmodeling -- 8.4.2.3. Modeling -- 8.4.2.4. Generate and perform unit test -- 8.4.2.5. Design automatic "happy path" unit test -- 8.4.3. Validation and deployment -- 8.4.3.1. Run automated tests -- 8.4.3.2. Run tests manually -- 8.4.3.3. Define migration strategy and plan -- 8.4.3.4. Perform data migration -- 8.4.3.5. Execute migration plan -- 8.5. Conclusions -- 9: Case Study -- 9.1. Case study presentation -- 9.2. Legacy modernization in action -- 9.2.1. Creating modernization project -- 9.2.2. Better dealing with the legacy material -- 9.2.3. Strategy for modernizing screens -- 9.2.4. Strategy for modernizing data items -- 9.2.5. Creating forward project -- 9.2.6. Entity extraction -- 9.2.7. From screens to pages and UI components -- 9.3. Annotations -- 9.4. Pattern definition -- 9.4.1. Pattern for simple statements -- 9.4.2. Patterns for operation calls -- 9.4.3. Patterns for operation calls with arguments -- 9.4. Database exchange modernization -- 9.5. Transmodeling -- 9.6. Transmodeling complex functionalities -- 9.6.1. Transmodeling the "custCost" program.

9.6.2. Modernizing "Add a new reservation" -- 9.7. Application generation and testing -- 9.8. Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index.

Nowadays, billions of lines of code are in the COBOL programming language. This book is an analysis, a diagnosis, a strategy, a MDD method and a tool to transform legacy COBOL into modernized applications that comply with Internet computing, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and the Cloud.  It serves as a blueprint for those in charge of finding solutions to this considerable challenge.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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