Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese : Revised Edition.

By: Taylor, Insup
Contributor(s): Taylor, M. Martin
Series: Studies in Written Language and Literacy Ser: Publisher: Amsterdam/Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (507 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027269447Subject(s): Chinese language.;Chinese language -- Writing.;Korean language.;Korean language -- Writing.;Japanese language.;Japanese language -- Writing.;LiteracyGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese : Revised EditionDDC classification: 495 LOC classification: PL1171.T37 2014Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- About the authors -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction -- How many Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese? -- How are the three peoples related? -- Languages of the world -- Phoneme, syllable, onset-rime, and body-coda -- Morpheme and word -- Types of writing systems -- Writing systems, their development and interrelations -- Scripts and literacy: A preview -- Chinese, Korean, and Japanese in Roman letters -- A few words about experiments on reading -- How the book is organized -- Part I. Chinese -- China and Chinese -- 2. Spoken Chinese -- Standard language and "dialects" -- Sound system -- Morphemes: Words or word parts -- Constructing two-morpheme words -- Why compound words? -- Foreign loan words -- Full words, empty words, and classifiers -- Sentence structures -- 3. Chinese characters: Hanzi -- Beginning of characters -- Evolution of characters' styles -- Chinese calligraphy -- Six categories of characters -- Number of characters -- Strokes and shapes of characters -- Complex vs simple characters -- 4. Meaning representation in characters -- Pictographs and indicators -- Radicals and semantic radicals -- Characters tell stories -- Compound words and idioms -- Characters for abbreviations -- Chinese numerals -- Chinese personal names -- Magical quality of characters -- Characters understood across times and places -- 5. Sound representation by characters -- A character's sound -- Phonetic radicals -- Polyphonic, unpronounced, or homophonic characters -- Phonetic loans and Fanqie -- Phonetic scripts for Chinese -- 6. History of education and literacy in China -- Confucianism and Confucian classics -- The civil-service examination system -- Chinese world views -- Invention of paper and printing -- Books and publications.
Traditional and pre-1949 education -- In women ignorance was virtue -- History and degrees of literacy -- 7. Reforming spoken and written Chinese -- Mandarin and Putonghua (common speech) -- Literary vs vernacular language -- Rationalizing the Chinese writing system -- How characters are simplified -- Romanization, Zhuyin Fuhao, and Pinyin -- Computerizing Chinese characters -- Keep or abandon characters? -- 8. School, and learning to read in Chinese -- Primary and secondary schools: Growing, if unequally -- Tertiary education -- Should preschoolers be taught to read? -- How Hanzi are taught to preschoolers -- Teaching Hanzi (and English) in Chinese-speaking regions -- How Hanzi are taught in school in China -- Semantic radicals and phonetic radicals -- Phonological awareness -- Morphological (and phonological) awareness -- Visual and orthographic processing -- Developmental dyslexia or reading difficulty -- Summary and conclusions -- Part II. Korean -- Korea and Koreans -- 9. Korean language -- Speech sounds and syllables -- Korean native words -- Sino-Korean (S-K)words -- Native words vs Sino-Korean words -- European (and Japanese) loan words -- Numerals and classifiers -- Content words, grammatical morphemes, and sentences -- Speech levels and honorifics -- 10. Hancha: Chinese characters -- Hancha adoption -- Complicated Hancha use in the past -- Hancha use in the present -- Misguided attempts to abolish Hancha -- 11. Han'gŭl: Alphabetic syllabary -- Creation and adoption of Han'gŭl -- Han'gŭl as an alphabet -- Han'gŭl syllable blocks -- Varied shapes and complexity of syllable blocks -- Linear vs packaged arrangement of Han'gul letters -- Changes in Han'gŭl since its creation -- Was Han'gŭl an original creation? -- Han'gŭl, an alphabetic syllabary or alpha-syllabary -- 12. Learning and using Han'gŭl.
Teaching Han'gŭl as an alphabet or a syllabary -- Preschoolers learn Han'gul -- Schoolchildren learn to read in Han'gul -- Instruction in Han'gŭl spelling -- Han'gŭl spelling vs romanized spelling -- Phonological awareness and salience of syllable -- Morphological awareness -- Visual skills -- Poor readers in Han'gul -- 13. Why should Hancha be kept? -- Advantages of Hancha -- Disadvantages of not knowing Hancha -- Korean personal names -- Hancha-Han'gŭl mixed vs all-Han'gŭl text -- Hancha teaching in secondary school -- Streamline and keep Hancha -- 14. History of education and literacy in Korea -- Civil service examination in Korea -- Traditional education -- Modern education -- Education in S. Korea today -- Printing and publications -- Mass literacy -- Summary and conclusions -- Part III. Japanese -- Japan and Japanese -- 15. Japanese language -- Speech sounds, syllables, and moras -- Composition of Japanese vocabulary -- Japanese native vs Sino-Japanese (S-J) words -- European and English loan words -- Numerals and classifiers -- Content words and grammatical morphemes -- Sentence structures -- 16. Kanji: Chinese characters -- Indigenous Japanese scripts? -- Introduction and spread of Kanji -- Kanji uses in different times -- Kanji readings: On/Chinese and Kun/Japanese -- Two-Kanji words: Readings -- Kanji, Hancha, and Hanzi compared -- 17. Kana: Japanese syllabary -- Kana: Origin and development -- Kana graphs: Number and order -- How to use Kana -- Furigana or annotating Kana -- Katakana for foreign loan words -- 18. Rōmaji: Roman letters -- Rōmaji for European words and foreigners -- Rōmaji styles: Hepburn, Japanese, and Cabinet -- Should Rōmaji replace the Japanese scripts? -- Disadvantages of Rōmaji -- 19. Why keep Kanji? -- Kanji differentiate homophones -- Meanings of Kanji words are grasped well -- Kanji for compound words.
Kanji for technical terms and abbreviations -- Kanji stand out in mixed-script text -- Kanji for personal names -- Disadvantages of Kanji -- Typing and word processing -- Kanji use declined and then stabilized -- 20. History of mass literacy in Japan -- Early limited literacy -- Dawn of mass literacy -- Mass literacy after World War II -- History of books and publications -- Manga! Manga! -- 21. Learning and using Kanji and Kana -- Preschoolers acquire reading -- Kana and Kanji teaching in school -- Textbooks for reading instruction -- Kanji vs Kana: Naming and extracting meaning -- How well are Kanji read and written? -- Dyslexia or poor reading in Japanese -- 22. The Japanese educational system -- Primary and secondary school: Overview -- Preschool and primary school -- Middle and high school -- Tertiary education -- Japanese education: Problems and promises -- Summary and conclusions -- Part IV. Common issues -- 23. Eye movements and text writing in East Asia -- Eye movements in reading English text -- Eye movements in Chinese reading -- Eye movements in Japanese and Korean reading -- Conventions in writing/reading directions -- Punctuation marks and spacing -- Prose and paragraph structure -- 24. Reading and the brain -- Human brain: Structures and functions -- Brain processing when reading in Roman alphabets -- Brain processing when reading in East Asian scripts -- 25. East Asian students in international tests -- Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) -- Top Ten in the 2006, 2009, and 2012 assessments -- PISA results: Some details -- Factors that may not influence achievement -- Factors that influence achievement sometimes -- Factors that may matter -- 26. Logographic characters vs phonetic scripts -- Logography, alphabet, and syllabary -- Direct vs indirect access to meaning and sound.
Words in logography vs phonetic script: Reading aloud -- Logography vs phonetic script: Meaning extraction -- Flexible routes to sounds and meanings of words -- Logography vs phonetic script: Remembering -- Logography vs phonetic script: Learning to read -- Alphabet vs logography for science -- Effects of scripts and literacy on cognition -- Afterthoughts -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Name index -- Subject index.
Summary: The book describes how the three East Asian writing systems-Chinese, Korean, and Japanese- originated, developed, and are used today. Uniquely, this book: (1) examines the three East Asian scripts (and English) together in relation to each other, and (2) discusses how these scripts are, and historically have been, used in literacy and how they are learned, written, read, and processed by the eyes, the brain, and the mind. In this second edition, the authors have included recent research findings on the uses of the scripts, added several new sections, and rewritten several other sections. They have also added a new Part IV to deal with issues that similarly involve all the four languages/scripts of their interest. The book is intended both for the general public and for interested scholars. Technical terms (listed in a glossary) are used only when absolutely necessary.
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Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- About the authors -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction -- How many Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese? -- How are the three peoples related? -- Languages of the world -- Phoneme, syllable, onset-rime, and body-coda -- Morpheme and word -- Types of writing systems -- Writing systems, their development and interrelations -- Scripts and literacy: A preview -- Chinese, Korean, and Japanese in Roman letters -- A few words about experiments on reading -- How the book is organized -- Part I. Chinese -- China and Chinese -- 2. Spoken Chinese -- Standard language and "dialects" -- Sound system -- Morphemes: Words or word parts -- Constructing two-morpheme words -- Why compound words? -- Foreign loan words -- Full words, empty words, and classifiers -- Sentence structures -- 3. Chinese characters: Hanzi -- Beginning of characters -- Evolution of characters' styles -- Chinese calligraphy -- Six categories of characters -- Number of characters -- Strokes and shapes of characters -- Complex vs simple characters -- 4. Meaning representation in characters -- Pictographs and indicators -- Radicals and semantic radicals -- Characters tell stories -- Compound words and idioms -- Characters for abbreviations -- Chinese numerals -- Chinese personal names -- Magical quality of characters -- Characters understood across times and places -- 5. Sound representation by characters -- A character's sound -- Phonetic radicals -- Polyphonic, unpronounced, or homophonic characters -- Phonetic loans and Fanqie -- Phonetic scripts for Chinese -- 6. History of education and literacy in China -- Confucianism and Confucian classics -- The civil-service examination system -- Chinese world views -- Invention of paper and printing -- Books and publications.

Traditional and pre-1949 education -- In women ignorance was virtue -- History and degrees of literacy -- 7. Reforming spoken and written Chinese -- Mandarin and Putonghua (common speech) -- Literary vs vernacular language -- Rationalizing the Chinese writing system -- How characters are simplified -- Romanization, Zhuyin Fuhao, and Pinyin -- Computerizing Chinese characters -- Keep or abandon characters? -- 8. School, and learning to read in Chinese -- Primary and secondary schools: Growing, if unequally -- Tertiary education -- Should preschoolers be taught to read? -- How Hanzi are taught to preschoolers -- Teaching Hanzi (and English) in Chinese-speaking regions -- How Hanzi are taught in school in China -- Semantic radicals and phonetic radicals -- Phonological awareness -- Morphological (and phonological) awareness -- Visual and orthographic processing -- Developmental dyslexia or reading difficulty -- Summary and conclusions -- Part II. Korean -- Korea and Koreans -- 9. Korean language -- Speech sounds and syllables -- Korean native words -- Sino-Korean (S-K)words -- Native words vs Sino-Korean words -- European (and Japanese) loan words -- Numerals and classifiers -- Content words, grammatical morphemes, and sentences -- Speech levels and honorifics -- 10. Hancha: Chinese characters -- Hancha adoption -- Complicated Hancha use in the past -- Hancha use in the present -- Misguided attempts to abolish Hancha -- 11. Han'gŭl: Alphabetic syllabary -- Creation and adoption of Han'gŭl -- Han'gŭl as an alphabet -- Han'gŭl syllable blocks -- Varied shapes and complexity of syllable blocks -- Linear vs packaged arrangement of Han'gul letters -- Changes in Han'gŭl since its creation -- Was Han'gŭl an original creation? -- Han'gŭl, an alphabetic syllabary or alpha-syllabary -- 12. Learning and using Han'gŭl.

Teaching Han'gŭl as an alphabet or a syllabary -- Preschoolers learn Han'gul -- Schoolchildren learn to read in Han'gul -- Instruction in Han'gŭl spelling -- Han'gŭl spelling vs romanized spelling -- Phonological awareness and salience of syllable -- Morphological awareness -- Visual skills -- Poor readers in Han'gul -- 13. Why should Hancha be kept? -- Advantages of Hancha -- Disadvantages of not knowing Hancha -- Korean personal names -- Hancha-Han'gŭl mixed vs all-Han'gŭl text -- Hancha teaching in secondary school -- Streamline and keep Hancha -- 14. History of education and literacy in Korea -- Civil service examination in Korea -- Traditional education -- Modern education -- Education in S. Korea today -- Printing and publications -- Mass literacy -- Summary and conclusions -- Part III. Japanese -- Japan and Japanese -- 15. Japanese language -- Speech sounds, syllables, and moras -- Composition of Japanese vocabulary -- Japanese native vs Sino-Japanese (S-J) words -- European and English loan words -- Numerals and classifiers -- Content words and grammatical morphemes -- Sentence structures -- 16. Kanji: Chinese characters -- Indigenous Japanese scripts? -- Introduction and spread of Kanji -- Kanji uses in different times -- Kanji readings: On/Chinese and Kun/Japanese -- Two-Kanji words: Readings -- Kanji, Hancha, and Hanzi compared -- 17. Kana: Japanese syllabary -- Kana: Origin and development -- Kana graphs: Number and order -- How to use Kana -- Furigana or annotating Kana -- Katakana for foreign loan words -- 18. Rōmaji: Roman letters -- Rōmaji for European words and foreigners -- Rōmaji styles: Hepburn, Japanese, and Cabinet -- Should Rōmaji replace the Japanese scripts? -- Disadvantages of Rōmaji -- 19. Why keep Kanji? -- Kanji differentiate homophones -- Meanings of Kanji words are grasped well -- Kanji for compound words.

Kanji for technical terms and abbreviations -- Kanji stand out in mixed-script text -- Kanji for personal names -- Disadvantages of Kanji -- Typing and word processing -- Kanji use declined and then stabilized -- 20. History of mass literacy in Japan -- Early limited literacy -- Dawn of mass literacy -- Mass literacy after World War II -- History of books and publications -- Manga! Manga! -- 21. Learning and using Kanji and Kana -- Preschoolers acquire reading -- Kana and Kanji teaching in school -- Textbooks for reading instruction -- Kanji vs Kana: Naming and extracting meaning -- How well are Kanji read and written? -- Dyslexia or poor reading in Japanese -- 22. The Japanese educational system -- Primary and secondary school: Overview -- Preschool and primary school -- Middle and high school -- Tertiary education -- Japanese education: Problems and promises -- Summary and conclusions -- Part IV. Common issues -- 23. Eye movements and text writing in East Asia -- Eye movements in reading English text -- Eye movements in Chinese reading -- Eye movements in Japanese and Korean reading -- Conventions in writing/reading directions -- Punctuation marks and spacing -- Prose and paragraph structure -- 24. Reading and the brain -- Human brain: Structures and functions -- Brain processing when reading in Roman alphabets -- Brain processing when reading in East Asian scripts -- 25. East Asian students in international tests -- Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) -- Top Ten in the 2006, 2009, and 2012 assessments -- PISA results: Some details -- Factors that may not influence achievement -- Factors that influence achievement sometimes -- Factors that may matter -- 26. Logographic characters vs phonetic scripts -- Logography, alphabet, and syllabary -- Direct vs indirect access to meaning and sound.

Words in logography vs phonetic script: Reading aloud -- Logography vs phonetic script: Meaning extraction -- Flexible routes to sounds and meanings of words -- Logography vs phonetic script: Remembering -- Logography vs phonetic script: Learning to read -- Alphabet vs logography for science -- Effects of scripts and literacy on cognition -- Afterthoughts -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Name index -- Subject index.

The book describes how the three East Asian writing systems-Chinese, Korean, and Japanese- originated, developed, and are used today. Uniquely, this book: (1) examines the three East Asian scripts (and English) together in relation to each other, and (2) discusses how these scripts are, and historically have been, used in literacy and how they are learned, written, read, and processed by the eyes, the brain, and the mind. In this second edition, the authors have included recent research findings on the uses of the scripts, added several new sections, and rewritten several other sections. They have also added a new Part IV to deal with issues that similarly involve all the four languages/scripts of their interest. The book is intended both for the general public and for interested scholars. Technical terms (listed in a glossary) are used only when absolutely necessary.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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