Ancient Greek Verb-Initial Compounds : Their Diachronic Development Within the Greek Compound System.

By: Tribulato, Olga
Publisher: Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (478 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783110415827Subject(s): Greek language -- Compound words.;Greek language -- Grammar.;Greek language -- Verb.;Language and languagesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ancient Greek Verb-Initial Compounds : Their Diachronic Development Within the Greek Compound SystemDDC classification: 485/.6 LOC classification: PA337 .T84 2015Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- List of tables -- Abbreviations -- General abbreviations -- Signs and symbols -- Bibliographical abbreviations -- Ancient authors and works -- Introduction -- 1 Overview -- 2 Studying AG V1 compounds: scope and aims -- 3 Methodology: V1 compounds in the context of the AG compound system -- 4 The Corpus -- 5 Structure (i): Defining compounding and compound categories -- 6 Structure (ii): The historical perspective -- 7 Structure (iii): The use of V1 compounds in context -- Chapter One. Compounding and the Classification of Compounds -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Compounds and compounding -- 3 The definition of compounds -- 3.1 Defining criteria: spelling, stress, inflectional markers -- 4 Ancient Greek compounding as stem compounding -- 4.1 A typical morphophonological feature: the linking vowel -- 4.2 Vocalic encounters: hiatus, elision, contraction and lengthening -- 4.3 Phonological features: accent -- 4.4 Writing of Greek compounds -- 5 Semantic approaches to compounding -- 5.1 Lexicalization and idiomaticity -- 5.2 Lexicalization and idiomaticity in Ancient Greek -- 6 Syntactic approaches to compounding -- 6.1 Synthetic compounds -- 6.2 Romance compounds -- 6.3 Recursiveness in compounding -- 6.4 Syntactic approaches to Ancient Greek compounding: inflected FCs and univerbations -- 6.5 Summary -- 7 Towards the classification of compounds: basic criteria -- 7.1 Heads, headedness and related issues -- 7.2 Endocentric and exocentric compounds -- 7.3 Right-headed and left-headed compounds -- 7.4 Summary -- 7.5 Syntax and semantics as classificatory criteria -- 8 A model of classification -- 8 .1 Subordinated and coordinated as the two fundamental categories -- 9 The classification of Ancient Greek compounds: introductory issues -- 9.1 Classic approaches: from Sanskrit to Greek -- 9.2 Rektion, government, verbal nexus.
9.3 Endocentric and exocentric in the Greek compound system -- 9.4 Right-oriented and left-oriented compounds -- 10 Conclusion -- Chapter Two. The Compound Categories of Ancient Greek -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Coordinated compounds -- 2.1 Classification issues: endocentric and exocentric coordinated compounds -- 2.2 Coordinated compounds in Greek -- 3 Iterative compounds -- 3.1 Iterative compounds in Greek -- 4 Subordinated compounds -- 4.1 Right-oriented endocentric determinative compounds in Greek -- 4.2 [N N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.3 [A N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.4 [P N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.5 [Num N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.6 [P A]A, [A A]A and [N A]A endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.7 Overview of the development of right-oriented endocentric determinative compounds in Greek -- 5 Right-oriented exocentric determinative compounds (bahuvrihis) -- 5.1 Structure, suffixes and accent -- 5.2 The relationship between bahuvrihis and determinative compounds -- 5.3 Types and productivity of bahuvrihis -- 5.4 Metaphorical function of the FC -- 6 V2 compounds -- 6.1 Bound SCs: root compounds -- 6.2 Bound SCs: compounds in ‑ής -- 6.3 Unbound SCs: agentive adjectives and nouns in ‑ος -- 6.3.1 Hypotheses on the PIE origin of ‑ος compounds -- 6.3.2 Compounds in ‑ος and their simplicia: towards a [N N] structure? -- 6.3.3 On ablaut in the SC -- 6.4 Unbound SCs: agentive compounds in ‑της (and those in ‑τηρ and ‑τωρ) -- 6.4.1 The rise of ‑της forms -- 6.4.2 Morphology and structure of ‑της compounds -- 6.5 Summary: agentive compounds in Ancient Greek -- 6.6 Unbound SCs: compounded participles -- 6.7 Unbound SCs: V2 adjectives in ‑τoς -- 6.8 Unbound second constituents: residual classes -- 6.9 Greek right-oriented V2 compounds: summary -- 7 Left-oriented subordinated compounds.
7.1 Prepositional compounds -- 7.2 Left-oriented determinative compounds -- 7.2.1 The question of 'reversed bahuvrihis' -- 7.2.2 The Armstrong sub-type -- 7.2.3 [N N]A reversed bahuvrihis? -- 7.3 Left-oriented endocentric determinative compounds with a substantival head -- 7.4 Determinative compounds with a governing adjectival head -- 7.5 Left-oriented verb-first compounds and the question of their interpretation -- 7.5.1 The FC of V1 compounds: descriptive overview -- 7.5.2 Productivity of Ancient Greek V1 compounds -- 7.5.3 Exocentricity of V1 compounds -- 7.5.4 Left orientation and word order patterns -- 8 Onomastics and compounds -- 8.1 Onomastics and V1 compounds -- 9 Compound verbs -- 10 The use of compounds in Ancient Greek -- 11 Conclusion -- Chapter Three. The Study of Ancient Greek and Indo-European V1 Compounds in the Last Two Centuries -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The investigation of Greek V1 compounds in the last two centuries: preliminary considerations -- 3 Early nineteenth-century work -- 4 Wilhelm Clemm and the stem hypothesis -- 5 Jacobi, Delbrück and Brugmann: from stems to imperatives -- 6 Beyond the imperatival hypothesis: other approaches to 6 τερψίμβροτος compounds -- 7 The syntactic hypothesis and other work on V1 compounds and IE word order -- 7.1 Further syntactic approaches -- 8 The stem hypothesis reconsidered: recent approaches -- 9 Two twentieth-century works on Greek V1 compounds -- 9.1 Theodor Knecht's Geschichte der griechischen Komposita vom Typ te???µß??t?? -- 9.2 Frei-Lüthy (1978) and the influence of onomastics -- 9.3 On the onomastic origin of V1 compounds: a critique -- 10 Conclusion -- Chapter Four. The Historical Perspective: PIE Background and Development of V1 Compounds in Early Greek -- 1 Introduction -- 2 V1 compounds in Indo-European -- 2.1 The PIE background of V1 compounds.
2.2 Summary and working hypothesis: a late PIE bipartite system -- 3 φερέοικος type: structure, stems and linking elements -- 3.1 FCs in -?- -- 3.2 FCs in -?- -- 4 τερψίμβροτος type: structure, stems and linking elements -- 4.1 FCs in -εσι-, -σε- and -σo- -- 4.2 The synchronic role of action nouns -- 4.3 FCs in ‑τι‑ -- 4.3.1 Do Greek FCs in ‑ti‑ and ‑si‑ go back to old action or agent nouns? -- 4.3.2 The action nouns hypothesis: excursus on the Vedic evidence -- 5 -ti- and -si- forms: the Mycenaean evidence -- 5.1 Are -ti- forms the ancestors of -si- forms? -- 6 V1 compounds in the context of the PIE verbal system -- 6.1 The derivation of compounds FCs from verbal roots or stems -- 7 Mycenaean compounds as an intermediary stage -- 7.1 V1 compounds from *h2er- -- 7.2 V1 compounds from *h3er- -- 7.3 V1 compounds from *steh2- (or *teh2-) -- 7.4 V1 compounds from *k ȇ ns- -- 7.5 V1 compounds from *k ȇ nd- -- 7.6 V1 compounds from *med- -- 7.7 V1 compounds from *nes- -- 7.8 V1 compounds from *sweh2d- -- 7.9 The system of V1 compounds in Mycenaean -- 7.10 Summary -- 8 Compounds in -ti- in early alphabetic Greek -- 8.1 Ὀρτίλοχος -- 8.2 Δωτώ -- 8.3 βητάρμων -- 8.4 βωτιάνειρα -- 8.5 Καστιάνειρα -- 8.6 ἀρτιεπής -- 8.7 Summary -- 9 Conclusion -- Chapter Five. The Analysis of V1 Compounds Within the Greek Compound System. Part I: V1 Compounds Without V2 Counterparts -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Setting up the V1-V2 comparison: corpus and methodology -- 3 V1 compounds without a V2 counterpart: introduction -- 4 Class I: V1 compounds derived from verbs which give rise neither to a V2 compound nor to an agent noun -- 4.1 Poetic verbs and rare V1 compounds -- 4.2 Onomastic compound families -- 4.3 Common verbs, rare V1 families (less than four items) -- 4.4 Productive compound families of Class I (four items or more) -- 4.5 Class I: summary.
5 Class II: V1 compounds without a V2 counterpart deriving from verbs which give rise to agent nouns -- 5.1 Agent nouns from the verbs in Class II -- 5.1.1 -t?? agent nouns -- 5.1.2 -t?? and -t?? agent nouns -- 5.1.3 Verbs producing agent nouns in -?? -- 5.1.4 Verbs giving rise to more than one type of agent noun -- 5.2 Analysis of Class II -- 5.3 The V1 compounds in Class II -- 5.3.1 Productive V1 compound families (four items or more) -- 5.3.1.1 Summary of characteristics -- 5.3.2 Less productive V1 compound families -- 5.3.2.1 Summary of characteristics -- 6 Class III: V1 compounds with an intransitive or passive V2 counterpart -- 7 Conclusion -- Chapter Six. The Analysis of V1 Compounds Within the Greek Compound System. Part II: V1 Compounds With a V2 Counterpart -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Class IV: the base verbs, their agent nouns and verbal compounds -- 2.1 Verbs in Class IV and their agent nouns -- 2.1.1 Agent nouns and active V2 compounds of the CoC-os type -- 2.1.2 Agent nouns and active -?? V2 compounds in short vowel -- 2.1.3 Agent nouns in -t?? and -t?? -- 2.1.4 Agent nouns and V2 compounds in -t?? -- 2.1.5 Other types of verbal nouns and compounds with agentive semantics -- 2.2 Relevance of morphological analysis to the investigation of V1/V2 pairs -- 2.3 Verbs with only active V2 compounds in -?? -- 3 Competing pairs of V1 and V2 compounds: a contrastive analysis -- 3.1 Productive compound families -- 3.1.1 Summary of characteristics -- 3.2 Less productive compound families -- 3.2.1 Summary of characteristics -- 4 V1 compounds and deverbative compounds in ‑ής -- 4.1 Verbal ‑ής compounds: a brief history -- 4.2 ‑ής formations as the main source of active V2 compounds -- 4.2.1 Summary of characteristics -- 4.3 Active ‑ής compounds complementing other V2 types -- 5 Fulfilling the need of V2 compounds: other right-oriented formations.
5.1 Summary of characteristics.
Summary: This book provides a study of the diachronic development of compounds with a verbal first constituent in Ancient Greek. Based on an unprecedentedly comprehensive corpus of such compounds, it offers detailed treatments of their origins, structure and place within the Greek compound system, as well as in-depth and up-to-date introductions to Greek compounds and to linguistic research on compounding.
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Intro -- Contents -- List of tables -- Abbreviations -- General abbreviations -- Signs and symbols -- Bibliographical abbreviations -- Ancient authors and works -- Introduction -- 1 Overview -- 2 Studying AG V1 compounds: scope and aims -- 3 Methodology: V1 compounds in the context of the AG compound system -- 4 The Corpus -- 5 Structure (i): Defining compounding and compound categories -- 6 Structure (ii): The historical perspective -- 7 Structure (iii): The use of V1 compounds in context -- Chapter One. Compounding and the Classification of Compounds -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Compounds and compounding -- 3 The definition of compounds -- 3.1 Defining criteria: spelling, stress, inflectional markers -- 4 Ancient Greek compounding as stem compounding -- 4.1 A typical morphophonological feature: the linking vowel -- 4.2 Vocalic encounters: hiatus, elision, contraction and lengthening -- 4.3 Phonological features: accent -- 4.4 Writing of Greek compounds -- 5 Semantic approaches to compounding -- 5.1 Lexicalization and idiomaticity -- 5.2 Lexicalization and idiomaticity in Ancient Greek -- 6 Syntactic approaches to compounding -- 6.1 Synthetic compounds -- 6.2 Romance compounds -- 6.3 Recursiveness in compounding -- 6.4 Syntactic approaches to Ancient Greek compounding: inflected FCs and univerbations -- 6.5 Summary -- 7 Towards the classification of compounds: basic criteria -- 7.1 Heads, headedness and related issues -- 7.2 Endocentric and exocentric compounds -- 7.3 Right-headed and left-headed compounds -- 7.4 Summary -- 7.5 Syntax and semantics as classificatory criteria -- 8 A model of classification -- 8 .1 Subordinated and coordinated as the two fundamental categories -- 9 The classification of Ancient Greek compounds: introductory issues -- 9.1 Classic approaches: from Sanskrit to Greek -- 9.2 Rektion, government, verbal nexus.

9.3 Endocentric and exocentric in the Greek compound system -- 9.4 Right-oriented and left-oriented compounds -- 10 Conclusion -- Chapter Two. The Compound Categories of Ancient Greek -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Coordinated compounds -- 2.1 Classification issues: endocentric and exocentric coordinated compounds -- 2.2 Coordinated compounds in Greek -- 3 Iterative compounds -- 3.1 Iterative compounds in Greek -- 4 Subordinated compounds -- 4.1 Right-oriented endocentric determinative compounds in Greek -- 4.2 [N N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.3 [A N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.4 [P N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.5 [Num N]N endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.6 [P A]A, [A A]A and [N A]A endocentric determinative compounds -- 4.7 Overview of the development of right-oriented endocentric determinative compounds in Greek -- 5 Right-oriented exocentric determinative compounds (bahuvrihis) -- 5.1 Structure, suffixes and accent -- 5.2 The relationship between bahuvrihis and determinative compounds -- 5.3 Types and productivity of bahuvrihis -- 5.4 Metaphorical function of the FC -- 6 V2 compounds -- 6.1 Bound SCs: root compounds -- 6.2 Bound SCs: compounds in ‑ής -- 6.3 Unbound SCs: agentive adjectives and nouns in ‑ος -- 6.3.1 Hypotheses on the PIE origin of ‑ος compounds -- 6.3.2 Compounds in ‑ος and their simplicia: towards a [N N] structure? -- 6.3.3 On ablaut in the SC -- 6.4 Unbound SCs: agentive compounds in ‑της (and those in ‑τηρ and ‑τωρ) -- 6.4.1 The rise of ‑της forms -- 6.4.2 Morphology and structure of ‑της compounds -- 6.5 Summary: agentive compounds in Ancient Greek -- 6.6 Unbound SCs: compounded participles -- 6.7 Unbound SCs: V2 adjectives in ‑τoς -- 6.8 Unbound second constituents: residual classes -- 6.9 Greek right-oriented V2 compounds: summary -- 7 Left-oriented subordinated compounds.

7.1 Prepositional compounds -- 7.2 Left-oriented determinative compounds -- 7.2.1 The question of 'reversed bahuvrihis' -- 7.2.2 The Armstrong sub-type -- 7.2.3 [N N]A reversed bahuvrihis? -- 7.3 Left-oriented endocentric determinative compounds with a substantival head -- 7.4 Determinative compounds with a governing adjectival head -- 7.5 Left-oriented verb-first compounds and the question of their interpretation -- 7.5.1 The FC of V1 compounds: descriptive overview -- 7.5.2 Productivity of Ancient Greek V1 compounds -- 7.5.3 Exocentricity of V1 compounds -- 7.5.4 Left orientation and word order patterns -- 8 Onomastics and compounds -- 8.1 Onomastics and V1 compounds -- 9 Compound verbs -- 10 The use of compounds in Ancient Greek -- 11 Conclusion -- Chapter Three. The Study of Ancient Greek and Indo-European V1 Compounds in the Last Two Centuries -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The investigation of Greek V1 compounds in the last two centuries: preliminary considerations -- 3 Early nineteenth-century work -- 4 Wilhelm Clemm and the stem hypothesis -- 5 Jacobi, Delbrück and Brugmann: from stems to imperatives -- 6 Beyond the imperatival hypothesis: other approaches to 6 τερψίμβροτος compounds -- 7 The syntactic hypothesis and other work on V1 compounds and IE word order -- 7.1 Further syntactic approaches -- 8 The stem hypothesis reconsidered: recent approaches -- 9 Two twentieth-century works on Greek V1 compounds -- 9.1 Theodor Knecht's Geschichte der griechischen Komposita vom Typ te???µß??t?? -- 9.2 Frei-Lüthy (1978) and the influence of onomastics -- 9.3 On the onomastic origin of V1 compounds: a critique -- 10 Conclusion -- Chapter Four. The Historical Perspective: PIE Background and Development of V1 Compounds in Early Greek -- 1 Introduction -- 2 V1 compounds in Indo-European -- 2.1 The PIE background of V1 compounds.

2.2 Summary and working hypothesis: a late PIE bipartite system -- 3 φερέοικος type: structure, stems and linking elements -- 3.1 FCs in -?- -- 3.2 FCs in -?- -- 4 τερψίμβροτος type: structure, stems and linking elements -- 4.1 FCs in -εσι-, -σε- and -σo- -- 4.2 The synchronic role of action nouns -- 4.3 FCs in ‑τι‑ -- 4.3.1 Do Greek FCs in ‑ti‑ and ‑si‑ go back to old action or agent nouns? -- 4.3.2 The action nouns hypothesis: excursus on the Vedic evidence -- 5 -ti- and -si- forms: the Mycenaean evidence -- 5.1 Are -ti- forms the ancestors of -si- forms? -- 6 V1 compounds in the context of the PIE verbal system -- 6.1 The derivation of compounds FCs from verbal roots or stems -- 7 Mycenaean compounds as an intermediary stage -- 7.1 V1 compounds from *h2er- -- 7.2 V1 compounds from *h3er- -- 7.3 V1 compounds from *steh2- (or *teh2-) -- 7.4 V1 compounds from *k ȇ ns- -- 7.5 V1 compounds from *k ȇ nd- -- 7.6 V1 compounds from *med- -- 7.7 V1 compounds from *nes- -- 7.8 V1 compounds from *sweh2d- -- 7.9 The system of V1 compounds in Mycenaean -- 7.10 Summary -- 8 Compounds in -ti- in early alphabetic Greek -- 8.1 Ὀρτίλοχος -- 8.2 Δωτώ -- 8.3 βητάρμων -- 8.4 βωτιάνειρα -- 8.5 Καστιάνειρα -- 8.6 ἀρτιεπής -- 8.7 Summary -- 9 Conclusion -- Chapter Five. The Analysis of V1 Compounds Within the Greek Compound System. Part I: V1 Compounds Without V2 Counterparts -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Setting up the V1-V2 comparison: corpus and methodology -- 3 V1 compounds without a V2 counterpart: introduction -- 4 Class I: V1 compounds derived from verbs which give rise neither to a V2 compound nor to an agent noun -- 4.1 Poetic verbs and rare V1 compounds -- 4.2 Onomastic compound families -- 4.3 Common verbs, rare V1 families (less than four items) -- 4.4 Productive compound families of Class I (four items or more) -- 4.5 Class I: summary.

5 Class II: V1 compounds without a V2 counterpart deriving from verbs which give rise to agent nouns -- 5.1 Agent nouns from the verbs in Class II -- 5.1.1 -t?? agent nouns -- 5.1.2 -t?? and -t?? agent nouns -- 5.1.3 Verbs producing agent nouns in -?? -- 5.1.4 Verbs giving rise to more than one type of agent noun -- 5.2 Analysis of Class II -- 5.3 The V1 compounds in Class II -- 5.3.1 Productive V1 compound families (four items or more) -- 5.3.1.1 Summary of characteristics -- 5.3.2 Less productive V1 compound families -- 5.3.2.1 Summary of characteristics -- 6 Class III: V1 compounds with an intransitive or passive V2 counterpart -- 7 Conclusion -- Chapter Six. The Analysis of V1 Compounds Within the Greek Compound System. Part II: V1 Compounds With a V2 Counterpart -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Class IV: the base verbs, their agent nouns and verbal compounds -- 2.1 Verbs in Class IV and their agent nouns -- 2.1.1 Agent nouns and active V2 compounds of the CoC-os type -- 2.1.2 Agent nouns and active -?? V2 compounds in short vowel -- 2.1.3 Agent nouns in -t?? and -t?? -- 2.1.4 Agent nouns and V2 compounds in -t?? -- 2.1.5 Other types of verbal nouns and compounds with agentive semantics -- 2.2 Relevance of morphological analysis to the investigation of V1/V2 pairs -- 2.3 Verbs with only active V2 compounds in -?? -- 3 Competing pairs of V1 and V2 compounds: a contrastive analysis -- 3.1 Productive compound families -- 3.1.1 Summary of characteristics -- 3.2 Less productive compound families -- 3.2.1 Summary of characteristics -- 4 V1 compounds and deverbative compounds in ‑ής -- 4.1 Verbal ‑ής compounds: a brief history -- 4.2 ‑ής formations as the main source of active V2 compounds -- 4.2.1 Summary of characteristics -- 4.3 Active ‑ής compounds complementing other V2 types -- 5 Fulfilling the need of V2 compounds: other right-oriented formations.

5.1 Summary of characteristics.

This book provides a study of the diachronic development of compounds with a verbal first constituent in Ancient Greek. Based on an unprecedentedly comprehensive corpus of such compounds, it offers detailed treatments of their origins, structure and place within the Greek compound system, as well as in-depth and up-to-date introductions to Greek compounds and to linguistic research on compounding.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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