Hannah Arendt: On Walter Benjamin.

Contributor(s): Publisher number: 6982228 | KanopyPublisher: Michael Blackwood Productions, 1968Publisher: [San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2019Description: 1 online resource (streaming video file) (66 minutes): digital, .flv file, soundContent type:
  • two-dimensional moving image
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Online resources: Hannah Arendt, Peter StadelmayerSummary: An intimate and intellectual lecture given by Hannah Arendt about the work and fate of her friend and colleague in the philosophical field, Walter Benjamin. Delivered in January 1968 at the Goethe House in New York, Arendt's speech paid tribute to Benjamin's ideologies surrounding linguistic philosophy, history and literature. Arendt notes the importance of German-Jewish literature in Benjamin's work, insisting that "without being a poet, he thought poetically. For him the metaphor was the greatest gift of language, because it transforms the invisible into the sensual." (Hannah Ardent) Through his passion for writers such as Kafka, Goethe and Proust, Benjamin honed his own sort of theology revolving around classic texts, preservation, and the collecting of wisdom.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
 Kanopy Kanopy Digital Library Available
Total holds: 0

Title from title frames.

Film

In Process Record.

Hannah Arendt, Peter Stadelmayer

Originally produced by Michael Blackwood Productions in 1968.

An intimate and intellectual lecture given by Hannah Arendt about the work and fate of her friend and colleague in the philosophical field, Walter Benjamin. Delivered in January 1968 at the Goethe House in New York, Arendt's speech paid tribute to Benjamin's ideologies surrounding linguistic philosophy, history and literature. Arendt notes the importance of German-Jewish literature in Benjamin's work, insisting that "without being a poet, he thought poetically. For him the metaphor was the greatest gift of language, because it transforms the invisible into the sensual." (Hannah Ardent) Through his passion for writers such as Kafka, Goethe and Proust, Benjamin honed his own sort of theology revolving around classic texts, preservation, and the collecting of wisdom.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

In English

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.