Fibrocytes in Health and Disease.

Bucala, Richard.

Fibrocytes in Health and Disease. - 1 online resource (335 pages)

Intro -- Contents -- Preface -- Contributors -- Chapter 1. Hematopoietic Origin of Fibrocytes Mehrdad Abedi -- 1.1. Introduction -- 1.2. Structure of Bone Marrow -- 1.3. Marrow-Derived Fibroblasts -- 1.4. Origin of Fibroblasts in Tissue -- 1.5. Fibrocytes -- 1.6. What is the Relation between Macrophages and Circulating Fibroblasts Precursors? -- 1.7. Perspective -- References -- Chapter 2. Fibrocytes and Collagen-Producing Cells of the Peripheral Blood Richard H. Gomer and Darrell Pilling -- 2.1. Introduction: Fibrocytes Precursors Originate in Bone Marrow, and Exist in Blood -- 2.2. The Chemokine CXCL12 Attracts Circulating Fibrocyte Precursors to Sites of Injury -- 2.3. Identification of Circulating CCPCs in the Blood -- 2.4. Pulmonary Fibrosis Patients have Abnormally High Numbers of CCPCs -- 2.5. Scleroderma Patients have Abnormally High Numbers of CCPCs -- 2.6. Differences between CCPCs from Scleroderma Patients and Controls -- 2.7. Patients with Chronic Asthma have Abnormally High Numbers of CCPCs -- 2.8. CCPCs in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients -- 2.9. The Number of CCPCs Increases with Age -- 2.10. The Number of CCPCs Increases in an Animal Injury Model -- 2.11. Summary and Future Directions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 3. Regulatory Pathways of Fibrocyte Development Darrell Pilling and Richard H. Gomer -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Inhibition of Initial Fibrocyte Differentiation by Fcγ Receptor Ligation -- 3.3. Inhibition of Initial Fibrocyte Differentiation by Cytokines -- 3.4. Profibrotic Cytokines Promote Fibrocyte Differentiation -- 3.5. Regulation of Mature Fibrocyte Differentiation -- References -- Chapter 4. Fibrocyte Differentiation Pathways Ellen C. Keeley, Borna Mehrad and Robert M. Strieter -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Fibrocyte Differentiation along Mesenchymal Lineages -- 4.2.1. Myofibroblasts. 4.2.2. Adipocytes -- 4.2.3. Osteoblasts and Chondrocytes -- 4.3. Fibrocytes can be Reprogrammed to Modify the Fibroproliferative Response -- 4.4. Factors that Influence Differentiation of Fibrocytes from their Precursors -- 4.5. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5. Immunoregulation of Fibrocyte Differentiation Matthias Mack, Marianne Niedermeier and Barbara Reich -- 5.1. Detection and Origin of Fibrocytes -- 5.2. Interaction of Monocytes with CD4+ T Cells Enables Differentiation of Fibrocytes -- 5.3. Cytokines and CD4+ T Cell Phenotypes Regulate Fibrocyte Differentiation -- 5.4. Influence of Serum on Fibrocyte Differentiation -- 5.5. Proliferation of Fibrocytes? -- 5.6. Migration of Fibrocytes -- 5.7. How Fibrocytes Affect CD4+ T Cells -- 5.8. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6. The Role of Fibrocytes in Wound Repair and Hypertrophic Scarring Abelardo Medina, Jie Ding, Moein Momtazi, and Edward E. Tredget -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Dysregulated Repair of the Extracellular Matrix of Hypertrophic Scars -- 6.3. Dysregulated Apoptosis in Hypertrophic Scar -- 6.4. Increased Levels of the Profibrotic Growth Factors TGF-β and CTGF in Hypertrophic Scarring -- 6.5. Circulating Bone Marrow-Derived Fibrocytes in Hypertrophic Scarring -- 6.6. Characterization of Human Fibrocytes -- 6.7. Increased Numbers of Fibrocytes Found in the Blood and Hypertrophic Scar of Burn Patients -- 6.8. Angiogenic Effects of Fibrocytes in Wound Healing -- 6.9. Effects of Cell-To-Cell Interaction between Fibrocytes and Fibroblasts -- 6.10. Fibrocytes May Contribute to the Myofibroblast Population -- 6.11. Fibrocyte Reprogramming and Tissue Remodeling Capacity of Fibroblasts -- 6.12. Possible Role of Fibrocytes in Hypertrophic Scarring Via Polarized Th2 Immune Response -- 6.13. Proposed Role of Fibrocytes in a Model of Fibroproliferative Switch in Wound Healing. 6.14. Summary and Prospects for Future Work -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 7. Fibrocytes in Asthma Sabrina Mattoli, Marek Barczyk and Alberto Bellini -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Inflammation and Airway Remodeling in Asthma -- 7.3. Fibrocyte Involvement in Allergen-Exacerbated Asthma -- 7.4. Fibrocyte Trafficking and Localization in Relation to Asthma Severity -- 7.5. Fibrocyte Function in Asthma -- 7.6. Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 8. Fibrocytes in Interstitial Lung Disease Borna Mehrad, Ellen C. Keeley, Martin Kolb and Robert M. Strieter -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Data from Animal Models of Lung Fibrosis -- 8.2.1. Association of Fibrocytes with Lung Fibrosis -- 8.2.2. Mechanisms of Fibrocyte Migration to the Lungs -- 8.2.3. Fibrocyte Differentiation and Proliferation -- 8.3. Data from Human Studies -- 8.4. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9. Fibrocytes in Lung Fibrosis: Insights from Animal Models and Clinical Studies Payal Naik and Bethany B. Moore -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Clinical Problem and Significance -- 9.3. Natural History and Exacerbations of IPF -- 9.4. Animal Models of Fibrosis -- 9.5. Origin of Interstitial Fibroblasts -- 9.6. Fibrocyte Identification and Characterization -- 9.7. Migration of Mesenchymal Cell Precursors -- 9.8. Animal Models have Informed Our Understanding of Fibrocyte Migration -- 9.9. CCR2 in IPF and Animal Models of Fibrosis -- 9.10. Chimera Studies Indicate that Fibrocytes are Bone Marrow-Derived and Accumulation of Fibrocytes Correlate with the Degree of Lung Fibrosis -- 9.11. Differential Regulation of Fibrocyte Functions by CCR2 Ligand -- 9.12. Eicosanoid Regulation of Fibrocyte Function -- 9.13. The Interaction between Herpesviruses and Fibrocytes in Animal Models of Lung Fibrosis. 9.14. Latent Gammaherpesvirus Infection Augments Experimental Fibrosis -- 9.15. Lytic Herpesvirus Exacerbates Established Pulmonary Fibrosis -- 9.16. Conclusions from Animal Models -- 9.17. Fibrocytes in Human Asthma -- 9.18. Fibrocytes in Systemic Sclerosis -- 9.19. Fibrocytes in IPF -- 9.20. Fibrocytes as Biomarkers -- References -- Chapter 10. Fibrocytes in Scleroderma-Related Interstitial Lung Disease Susan K. Mathai and Erica L. Herzog -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Presence of Fibrocytes in Scleroderma -- 10.3. Murine Models of Scleroderma Lung Disease -- 10.4. Relationship to Injury and Apoptosis -- 10.5. Relationship to Macrophages -- 10.6. Immunologic Milieu -- 10.7. Semaphorin 7a -- 10.8. Caveolin-1 -- 10.9. Conclusion and Opportunities for Further Study -- References -- Chapter 11. Fibrocytes in the Etiopathogenesis of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Richard Bucala -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis -- 11.3. Role of Fibrocytes in NSF -- 11.4. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 12. Myeloid Fibroblast Precursors in Cardiac Interstitial Fibrosis - The Origin of Fibroblast Precursors Dictates the Pathophysiologic Role Mark L. Entman, Katarzyna A. Cieslik, Signe Carlson, Sandra B. Haudek, and JoAnn Trial -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.1.1. Fibrous Deposition -- 12.1.2. Fibrous Tissue and Myocardial Repair -- 12.1.3. Fibrous Tissue as an Adverse Pathologic Factor -- 12.1.4. Fibroblast Precursors and Their Origin -- 12.1.5. The Cell Biological Approach to Fibrosis and Fibroblast Development - Fibroblast Precursors and Their Signaling -- 12.2. MCP-1 Dysregulation and Cardiac Interstitial Fibrosis -- 12.2.1. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 -- 12.2.1.1. Chemokine Suppression - Role of TGF-β and IL-10 -- 12.2.2. Noninfarctive Chemokine-Induced Cardiomyopathy - Phenotype and Role of MCP-1 Dysregulation. 12.2.2.1. Role of MCP-1 -- 12.2.2.2. MCP-1 Deletion -- 12.2.3. Fibroblasts and Marrow-Derived Blood-Borne Fibroblast Precursors -- 12.2.4. MCP-1 Dysregulation - A Primary Etiology of I/RC -- 12.3. Monocyte to Fibroblast Transition - An In Vitro Model for Parallel Examination of Cellular Mechanisms in I/RC -- 12.3.1. Monocyte to Fibroblast Transition Requires MCP-1-Induced Transendothelial Migration -- 12.3.2. SAP and the FcγR -- 12.3.3. Rho Kinase and Reactive Fibrosis -- 12.3.4. ROCK1-/- in I/RC -- 12.3.5. IL-13 and Monocyte to Fibroblast Differentiation -- 12.4. Applicability of MCP-1-Monocyte- Fibroblast Transition Mechanism to Other Models of Pathological Interstitial Fibrosis -- 12.4.1. Angiotensin II -- 12.4.2. Interstitial Fibrosis in the Aging Heart -- 12.4.2.1. Aging Mice Developed Increased Interstitial Fibrosis -- 12.4.2.2. MCP-1 and CD45+ Fibroblasts Progressively Increase in the Aging Mouse Heart -- 12.4.2.3. Contrast Between Acute and Chronic Models -- 12.4.2.4. Interleukin-13 and the Th2 Phenotype -- 12.4.3. Human Studies -- 12.5. The Origin of Fibroblast Precursors Dictates the Pathophysiologic Role - An Hypothesis -- 12.5.1. Cardiac Interstitial Fibrosis and Adverse Remodeling -- 12.5.2. Fibroblast Precursors and Cardiac Scar Formation -- 12.5.3. Fibroblast Precursors May Have Dedicated Roles - An Hypothesis -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 13. Fibrocytes in Renal Fibrosis Norihiko Sakai, Kengo Furuichi, Kouji Matsushima, Shuichi Kaneko, and Takashi Wada -- 13.1. Introduction -- 13.2. Fibrocytes in an Experimental Renal Fibrosis Model -- 13.2.1. Detection of Fibrocytes in Fibrotic Kidneys -- 13.2.2. CCL21/CCR7 Signaling Regulates Fibrocytes Infiltration and Renal Fibrosis -- 13.2.3. Infiltration Routes of Fibrocytes to Fibrotic Kidneys. 13.2.4. Effect of Blockade of CCL21/CCR7 Signaling on Expression of Renal Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and Infiltration of F4/80-Positive Macrophages.

Key Features:Unique volume on the topic of fibrocytesSupercedes a WSPC book published in 2007Contributed by international leaders in fibrocyte research.

9789814343725


Fibroblasts.;Connective tissues -- Diseases.


Electronic books.

QP88.23 -- .B83 2012eb

611.0181