Education in Languages of Lesser Power :

Volker, Craig Alan.

Education in Languages of Lesser Power : Asia-Pacific Perspectives. - 1 online resource (316 pages) - IMPACT: Studies in Language and Society ; v.35 . - IMPACT: Studies in Language and Society .

Education in Languages of Lesser Power -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Dedication page -- Table of contents -- Education in Languages of Lesser Power -- Foreword -- Chapter 1. The diversity of Asia-Pacific language ecologies -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Inherited links between languages -- 3. Types of languages -- 4. Size of speaker populations -- 5. Rates and history of literacy -- 6. Degree of bi- or multilingualism -- 7. Government policies -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2. Education, power and sociolinguistic mobility -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Language, power and education -- 2.1 "Languages of lesser power": What we mean and what we do not mean -- 2.2 Education as a double-edged sword -- 3. Issues in the use of languages of lesser power in education -- 3.1 Defining "the language": Standardization, literacy, vernacularization -- 3.2 Access to the language: Learners and teachers -- 3.3 Approaches to teaching and levels of control -- 3.4 Motivations for learning -- 4. Discussion: Globalization and education in languages of lesser power -- References -- Chapter 3. A Yami language teacher's journey in Taiwan -- 1. Introduction -- 2. History of Yami -- 3. History of (non) use of Yami in education -- 4. Yami language use -- 5. Language choice in the Yami community -- 6. Challenges in using Yami in education -- 7. Case study of a Yami language teacher's journey -- 7.1 Teaching Yami in urban elementary schools -- 7.2 Teaching Yami as a language consultant in a graduate program -- 8. Assessment of community reaction to the use of the language -- References -- Abstract in Chinese -- Chapter 4. Power and other issues in minority language education in China -- 1. Overview of minority languages in China -- 2. Introduction to linguistic diversity in Yunnan -- 3. History and the contemporary language environment of Bai. 4. The Bai orthography: From Sino-Bai characters to Roman alphabet -- 5. The use of Bai in school -- 6. Bilingual education in Shílóng Elementary School -- 7. Challenges in using Bai in present-day education -- 8. Linguistic ecology and language choice -- References -- Abstract in Bai -- Abstract in Chinese -- Chapter 5. Forming a Korean identity in Japan -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 2.1 History -- 2.2 Korean schools in Japan -- 2.3 Ethnic identity issues -- 2.4 Changing attitudes of Japanese society. -- 3. Case study: One school, one family -- 3.1 Kyoto Choson Cheil Chogup Hakkyo (Kyoto Number One Korean Elementary School) -- 3.2 The family -- 3.2.1 Methodology -- 3.2.2 Family background -- 3.2.3 Language proficiency and use -- 3.2.4 Ethnic identity -- 3.2.5 Impact of Korean schools on ethnic identity -- 3.2.6 Future prospects -- 4. Discussion and conclusion -- References -- Appendix: Questionnaire and Interview Questions -- Questionnaire (English translation) -- Basic information -- Language proficiency -- Identity -- Interview questions -- Abstract in Japanese -- Chapter 6. Patani Malay in education -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The history of PM in the border provinces of southern Thailand -- 3. Rationale and challenges in using PM in education: Issues in language choice -- 3.1 Language situation survey -- 3.2 Contrastive studies between PM and Standard Malay and between PM and Thai -- 3.3 Planning to use PM as a language of education -- 3.4 The three scripts issue in PM orthography development -- 4. Implementation of the Patani Malay-Thai Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education Program -- 4.1 Curriculum development -- 4.2 Lesson planning, teaching methods and instructional materials development -- 4.3 Assessment of the community reaction and learner achievement -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- Abstract in Thai. Chapter 7. Language in schooling in Timor-Leste -- 1. Choices of languages in Timor-Leste -- 1.1 Independence and language policy -- 2. Language in Timorese education -- 2.1 Languages in education policy -- 2.2 First languages in education -- 2.3 Learning in Timorese classrooms -- 3. How teachers implement language policy in education -- 3.1 Senhor Alexandre and Senhor Helder -- 3.2 The use of official languages -- 3.3 Who talks in Timorese classrooms? -- 3.4 Written language in the classroom -- 4. Implications for teaching and learning -- References -- Abstracts in Portuguese and Tetum/Resumos -- (Português) -- (Tetum) -- Chapter 8. Bidayuh as a subject at pre-school and primary levels -- 1. Introduction to the contemporary language environment -- 2. History of the Bidayuh language(s) -- 3. History of (non-)use of this language in education -- 4. Extent to which Bidayuh is used today and the rationale for its use -- 5. Language use in schools -- 6. Issues of language choice in the Bidayuh community -- 7. Challenges in using this language in education -- 8. Bidayuh as a medium of instruction in schools -- 9. An initiative outside formal education: The Singai Development Online (SinDOP) Project -- 10. Discussion: Assessment of community reaction to the use of the language -- 11. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A -- Abstract in Bahasa Malaysia -- Chapter 9. Sustaining and maintaining a minority language -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Singapore and the Tamil language -- 2.1 The historical context -- 2.2 The post-colonial social compact -- 3. The Singapore school system and the bilingual policy -- 4. Policy responses to the declining use of Tamil -- 4.1 Tamil Language Curriculum and Pedagogy Review Committee -- 4.2 Umar Pulavar Tamil Language Centre (UPTLC) -- 4.3 Harnessing the use of media -- 5. Evaluation of policy initiatives. 5.1 Responses of teachers -- 5.2 Responses of students -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- Appendix C -- Abstract in Tamil -- Chapter 10. UNESCO's action in culture and the importance of language maintenance in the Pacific -- 1. Linguistic diversity in UNESCO's normative texts -- 2. Language vitality and the Atlas of the World's Endangered Languages -- 3. International Mother Language Day (21 February) -- 4. Linguistic diversity in the Pacific -- 5. Celebration of the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development (31 May) in Nauru -- 6. Vanuatu sand drawing inscribed on the intangible cultural heritage Representative List of Humanity -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11. State versus community approaches to language revival -- 1. Introduction to the contemporary language environment -- 2. A brief history of Wirangu -- 3. Wirangu in education -- 4. Motivation -- 5. Contemporary domains of use -- 6. Issues in language choice -- 7. Case study - Scotdesco community -- 8. Assessment of community reaction to the use of the language -- 9. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 12. Vernacular education in Papua New Guinea -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The languages of Papua New Guinea -- 3. Changes in formal education language policy -- 3.1 The PNG education system at Independence -- 3.2 Alternatives to all-English education -- 3.3 The Education Reforms of the 1990s -- 4. Language use in Madina village, New Ireland Province -- 5. Issues in language choice in this community -- 6. Challenges in establishing Nalik as a language of education -- 6.1 Infrastructure and materials -- 6.2 Funding -- 6.3 Teacher training -- 6.4 Poor liaison with the primary school -- 6.5 Non-Nalik-speaking children -- 6.6 Community concerns about falling standards of English -- 7. The demise of Nalik medium education. 8. Community reaction to education in Nalik -- 9. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Abstract in Tok Pisin -- Tok i Go Pas: Ol Tok Ples Skul long Papua Niugini: Kisim Save o Kisim Bagarap? -- Chapter 13. From despised jargon to language of education -- 1. Introduction: Norf'k language -- 2. History of the Norf'k language -- 3. History of the Norf'k language in education -- 4. Language use today -- 5. Language choice in the community -- 6. Educational challenges -- 7. Case study: Language camp -- 8. Community reaction to language in education -- 9. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix -- Chapter 14. Te Reo Māori - He Reo Kura? (Māori Language - A School Language?) -- 1. Introduction -- 2. I take te reo Māori mai i hea?: Origins of te reo Māori -- 3. Contemporary te reo Māori environment -- 4. Te reo Māori in education -- 4.1 Te reo Māori as a curriculum area -- 4.2 Te reo Māori as a medium of schooling -- 4.3 Te reo Māori outside the school gates -- 5. Final comments -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Linguistic and sociolinguistic descriptors -- Abstract in te reo Māori -- Tuhinga Whakarāpopoto -- Chapter 15. A study of bilingual education using Samoan language in New Zealand -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 2.1 Samoan language education in New Zealand -- 2.2 Context of the study -- 3. Methods -- 3.1 Schools and classrooms -- 3.2 Participants -- 3.2.1 Children -- 3.2.2 Teachers -- 3.3 Classroom lessons -- 4. Measures -- 4.1 Development of instruments for measuring Samoan (L1) -- 4.3 Assessment of L1 (Samoan) oral competency: Retelling -- 4.3.1 Sentence structure -- 4.3.2 Vocabulary -- 4.4 Assessment of L1 (Samoan) reading comprehension: Component analysis -- 4.5 Assessment of L2 (English) reading proficiency -- 4.5.1 Supplementary Tests of Achievement in Reading (STAR) -- 4.5.2 Progressive Achievement Tests (PAT) -- 5. Results. 5.1 L1 oral language: General patterns and development across grades.

Pasifika peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand are amongst the fastest growing population of all the minority groups. The 2006 census shows that the Pasifika population makes up 6.9% of the total New Zealand population (Statistics New Zealand 2009). The current projections are that this figure will increase in 2026 to 18%. Many of the children who are at present strong in their language are in danger of becoming either monolingual, speaking English only. Samoan children in bilingual classes can achieve equally or higher than their Samoan counterparts in mainstream classrooms. This paper argues that the Samoan language has a crucial place and role to play in the teaching, learning and success of Samoan students in New Zealand schools.

9789027269584


Linguistic minorities -- Education -- Asia.;Linguistic minorities -- Education -- Pacific Area.;Languages in contact -- Asia.;Languages in contact -- Pacific Area.;Language policies -- Asia.;Language policies -- Pacific Area.;Asia -- Social policy.


Electronic books.

P40.85.A8 -- E38 2015eb

418.0071/05