Controlled Drug Delivery :

Mateescu, M. A.

Controlled Drug Delivery : The Role of Self-Assembling Multi-Task Excipients. - 1 online resource (269 pages) - Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomedicine Ser. . - Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomedicine Ser. .

Front Cover -- Controlled Drug Delivery -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- Biography for book -- 1 The concept of self-assembling and the interactions involved -- 1.1 The concept of self-assembling -- 1.1.1 The concept of self-assembling by association/interaction processes -- 1.2 The nature of forces and types of interactions involved in self-assembly of macromolecules -- 1.3 Hydrogels and their role in drug conception and development -- 1.3.1 Organogels and micelles for drug delivery -- 1.4 Self-assembling phenomena in solid dosage forms -- 1.4.1 Hydrogen association and flexibility of chains -- 1.4.2 Ionically stabilized excipients -- 1.4.2.1 Two-speed self-assembled monolithic devices -- 1.4.3 Hydrophobic stabilization of excipients and drug release mechanisms -- 1.4.3.1 The concept of self-assembling by inclusion processes -- 1.4.3.2 Inclusion complexes of starch with fatty bioactive agents -- 1.4.3.3 Inclusion complexes and hydrophobic assembly of starch excipients -- 1.5 Conclusions -- References -- 2 Starch and derivatives as pharmaceutical excipients -- 2.1 General aspects -- 2.2 Structural considerations -- 2.3 Self-assembling in physically modified starches -- 2.3.1 Pregelatinized starch -- 2.3.2 Multifunctional excipient: binder-filler and binder-disintegrant -- 2.3.3 Extruded starch -- 2.3.4 Soft starch capsules -- 2.3.5 Hard capsules -- 2.3.6 Starch films as functional coatings -- 2.3.7 Starch microspheres and nanospheres in drug delivery -- 2.3.8 Starch complexes -- 2.3.9 Conclusions -- 2.4 Chemically modified starches and their self-assembling -- 2.4.1 Self-assembling in cross-linked starches -- 2.4.2 Starch ethers -- 2.4.3 Ionic starches and their self-assembling features -- 2.4.3.1 CMS as pH-responsive excipient -- 2.4.3.2 Cationic starch -- 2.4.4 Conclusions -- References. 3 Chitosan and its derivatives as self-assembled systems for drug delivery -- Abbreviations -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Unmodified chitosan-self-assembled thermogels -- 3.2.1 Mechanism of chitosan thermogelation -- 3.2.2 Chitosan thermogels -- 3.3 Amphiphilic chitosan derivatives -- 3.3.1 Alkylated chitosan -- 3.3.2 Acylated chitosan -- 3.3.2.1 Acylated chitosan -- 3.3.2.2 Acylated chitosan oligosaccharides -- 3.3.3 Cholesterol-modified chitosan -- 3.3.4 Cholic and deoxycholic acid-modified chitosan -- 3.3.5 5β-Cholanic acid-modified chitosan -- 3.3.6 Phthaloylchitosan and other hydrophobically modified chitosans -- 3.3.7 Hydrophobic drug-grafted chitosan -- 3.4 Amphiphilic/amphoteric chitosan derivatives -- 3.4.1 Hydrophobically modified carboxylated chitosan -- 3.4.1.1 Alkyl-modified carboxylated chitosan -- 3.4.1.2 Acyl-modified carboxylated chitosan -- 3.4.1.3 Cholesterol-modified carboxylated chitosan -- 3.4.1.4 Deoxycholic acid-modified carboxylated chitosan -- 3.4.2 Hydrophobically modified sulfated chitosan -- 3.5 Conclusion -- References -- 4 Chitosan-based polyelectrolyte complexes as pharmaceutical excipients -- Abbreviations -- 4.1 Introduction to chitosan-based polyelectrolyte complexes -- 4.1.1 Overview of chitosan-based polyelectrolyte complexes -- 4.1.2 Chitosan-based PECs in drug delivery -- 4.2 Chitosan-chondroitin sulfate PEC -- 4.3 Chitosan-carboxymethyl starch PEC -- 4.4 Chitosan-dextran sulfate PEC -- 4.5 Chitosan-pectin PEC -- 4.6 Chitosan-alginate PEC -- 4.6.1 Formulation of active agents with chitosan-alginate PEC -- 4.6.2 Chitosan-alginate beads -- 4.6.2.1 Small molecules -- 4.6.2.2 Proteins -- 4.6.2.3 Other active agents -- 4.6.3 Chitosan-alginate microspheres -- 4.6.4 Chitosan-alginate microcapsules -- 4.6.4.1 Small molecules -- 4.6.4.2 Proteins -- 4.6.5 Chitosan-alginate microparticles. 4.6.6 Chitosan-alginate nanoparticles and other forms -- 4.7 Chitosan complexed with other polysaccharides -- 4.8 Conclusion -- References -- 5 Self-assembling in natural, synthetic, and hybrid materials with applications in controlled drug delivery -- 5.1 General considerations -- 5.2 Natural polysaccharides and their derivatives used in controlled drug release -- 5.3 Self-assembling of synthetic polymers -- 5.3.1 Block copolymers as multitasking excipients for biomedical applications -- 5.3.1.1 Hydrogels -- 5.3.1.2 Thermoresponsive gels -- 5.3.1.3 Nanogels -- 5.3.1.4 Nanoparticles -- 5.3.1.5 Liposomes -- 5.3.2 Layer-by-layer self-assembled structures for drug delivery -- 5.4 Hybrid materials obtained by self-assembling -- 5.5 Conclusions -- References -- 6 Protein-protein associative interactions and their involvement in bioformulations -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Generalities on proteins, their roles, and their possible use as excipients -- 6.3 Albumin microspheres and nanoparticles for drug delivery -- 6.4 Self-assembling processes involving albumin and bioactive agents -- 6.5 Collagen: generalities and utilizations as material for biopharmaceutical applications -- 6.5.1 The collagen structure -- 6.5.1.1 Collagen cross-linking -- 6.5.2 Collagen-based biomaterials -- 6.5.3 CPMs and recognition self-assembling -- 6.6 Protein excipients for solid dosage forms -- 6.7 Pharmaceutical solid, oral, high-loaded, and gastro-resistant dosage forms of therapeutic enzymes -- 6.8 Gastro-resistant excipient-free pharmaceutical forms of therapeutic enzymes -- 6.9 Conclusion -- References -- Index.

In complex macromolecules, minor modifications can generate major changes, due to self-assembling capacities of macromolecular or supramolecular networks. Controlled Drug Delivery highlights how the multifunctionality of several materials can be achieved and valorized for pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical applications. Topics covered in this comprehensive book include: the concept of self-assembling; starch and derivatives as pharmaceutical excipients; and chitosan and derivatives as biomaterials and as pharmaceutical excipients. Later chapters discuss polyelectrolyte complexes as excipients for oral administration; and natural semi-synthetic and synthetic materials. Closing chapters cover protein-protein associative interactions and their involvement in bioformulations; self-assembling materials, implants and xenografts; and provide conclusions and perspectives. Offers novel perspectives of a new concept: how minor alterations can induce major self-stabilization by cumulative forces exerted at short and long distances Gives guidance on how to approach modifications of biopolymers for drug delivery systems and materials for implants Describes structure-properties relationships in proposed excipients, drug delivery systems and biomedical materials.

9781908818676


Drug delivery systems.;Excipients.;Self-organizing systems.


Electronic books.

RS199.5 -- .C668 2015eb

615.6